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NEWS
April 4, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Last July 18, Federal Express charged the government for Constant Surveillance Service for shipping military computers to the Air Force Base at Dover, Del. Once in Dover, a military cargo plane was to airlift the computers to Germany for use in developing a classified NATO weapons system. Records show, however, that, in Federal Express custody, surveillance of the computers was anything but constant. Two of the 11 packages were lost for two days and company records show that the rest were left temporarily in an unguarded truck - in violation of Defense Department rules.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By Ira Porter INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Wachovia Bank courier was carjacked and shot in the left shoulder yesterday afternoon in the city's Chestnut Hill section as he headed to a bank in Center City, police said. James Baggs, 45, was accosted by two men and shot once with a large-caliber weapon at the intersection of Cresheim Valley Drive and Germantown Avenue. Police said Baggs, of the city's Germantown section, was on his way to drop off some canceled checks at the Wachovia Bank at Fourth and Market Streets. Police said his assailants may have believed that he was carrying cash.
SPORTS
August 31, 1994 | by Bill Fleischman, Daily News Sports Writer
After Jim Courier took his Florida fling minivacation, the big question was: How soon would he find his tennis soul again? The answer is, about as long as a compelling, five-set match. Returning to tournament tennis last night for the first time since he declared he needed to get away from the sport, Courier brushed aside Aaron Krickstein, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4, in a first-round U.S. Open match. Although Krickstein's ranking has fallen to 43rd, opponents shiver when they think about getting involved in five-setters with him. He is 24-7 in five-set matches.
NEWS
May 5, 2005 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's dead, but rumors of links between Frank Sinatra and the Cosa Nostra are still kicking. Now comes a new unauthorized biography of the legendary entertainer, Sinatra: The Life, that says the star served as a Mafia courier and once narrowly escaped arrest with a briefcase containing $3.5 million in cash. The source of that tale, recounted in the new Vanity Fair, is Jerry Lewis, who hung out with the crooner in his 1960s Rat Pack days. Lewis told authors Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan that Sinatra "volunteered to be a messenger" for the mob and was going through customs in New York shortly after mobster Lucky Luciano was deported to Italy in 1946.
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | By Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
Richard Costello, president of Lodge 5, Fraternal Order of Police, is rarely at a loss for words. So, when it was revealed that someone had found on a city street a box full of urine samples of police officers who had applied for other positions, he rose to the occasion. "The careers of I don't know how many police officers were sitting on a street corner for I don't know how long," he lamented. As police reconstructed the trail of the errant specimens, investigators learned they had been packed in the municipal medical dispensary in the Municipal Services Building for shipment to the SmithKline Beecham labs for testing.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Steve Birnbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Every so often, I read in the papers about travel couriers, whose plane fare is paid for by companies that want important papers or packages delivered to another city. I can't seem to find information on this. Can you supply me with the names of some companies that are seeking couriers? There is not a very large supply of firms that provide couriers to companies, partly because many of these companies are large enough to have their own bonded employees to do this. There are still some possibilities, however, although the trips are not free but rather at a discounted ticket price.
SPORTS
February 28, 1997 | By Diane Pucin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Jim Courier was a champion, when he was ranked No. 1 in the world and winning French Opens and Australian Opens, he was able to hit the tennis ball almost before it hit the ground, "taking it early," tennis players said. Courier returned serve brutally hard, frightening opponents into double faults. Courier outworked everybody, was willing to stay on the court forever, was the quintessential blue-collar tennis player. Maybe the collar is still blue, and nobody will say that Courier doesn't work hard, but it doesn't seem to matter anymore.
NEWS
September 4, 2006 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think of it as a mini Tour De France, but with the riders stopping every so often to pick up and deliver packages. The course ran through Fairmount Park, where nearly 125 professional messengers gathered yesterday for the finals of the sixth annual North American Cycle Courier Championship. Nine mock businesses were set up at different locations. After starting near Memorial Hall, riders were given three hours to collect and deliver five packages spelled out in their manifests, or work orders.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | by Leigh Jackson and Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writers
Federal Express courier William "Skip" Moyer never really worried about going into dangerous neighborhoods, said Fran Wojnar, a dispatcher for the company and a friend of Moyer's for years. "I asked him about it, and he said you have to know what areas to stay away from," said Wojnar. "He made sure if he had to go into one of those areas, he just got in and got out. " But yesterday, Moyer, 37, a father of four, had no chance to escape. As he was delivering a first-priority package to a bleak block on 9th Street near Clearfield in North Philadelphia shortly before 10 a.m., he was shot in the face and killed in an apparent robbery attempt.
NEWS
September 21, 2005 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal jury found a former Atlantic City tax collector and his wife guilty yesterday of attempting to rob a tax office courier of $100,000 in cash and checks. Clinton Van Berry, 61, and his wife, Nadine Homick-Van Berry, 55, each face a maximum of 20 years in prison when they are sentenced. They also face a separate trial in a scheme to bribe the mayor of West Cape May for insider information on a federally funded sewer and water-main project. A date for that trial has not been set. In that case, prosecutors said, the Van Berrys hoped to use the information to secure work for Charles Varvaro, an Atlantic County contractor, then collect a cut from him. Varvaro, however, has been an FBI informant since 1978.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Wooden is a city resident and registered voter. Yet with two weeks until the mayoral primary election, Wooden has no idea who he is voting for. He is not alone. Like most of the dozen people interviewed during the lunch hour Monday at Dilworth Park, Wooden simply didn't know much about the candidates or even their names. Wooden said he has seen the television ads for a female candidate who said she would sue the state for not providing enough money for the schools.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
THE FEDERAL TRIAL of six ex-narcotics cops accused of robbing suspected drug dealers resumed yesterday with combative cross-examination of a man who said he was lifted over a third-floor balcony, followed by an ex-drug courier who said cops stole 3 kilos of cocaine from him. Orlando Ramirez testified that on the evening of Sept. 6, 2009, he and another man, Rodney Lord, went to an Upper Darby parking lot on their way to meet with drug buyers. Ramirez said he worked as a courier on behalf of his uncle, who at the time lived in Mexico.
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Bob Christie and Felicia Fonseca, Associated Press
PHOENIX - Authorities say a package addressed to Sheriff Joe Arpaio discovered in a northern Arizona mailbox would have exploded if opened, leading to serious injuries or death. Maricopa County Chief Deputy Jerry Sheridan made the comment Friday at a news conference in Phoenix. He said investigators are trying to locate one person who may have been involved in mailing the package addressed to his boss. The package intercepted late Thursday was addressed to Arpaio at his downtown Phoenix office.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Tom Hays, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A man who spent more than two decades behind bars was freed by a judge on Thursday after a reinvestigation of his case cast serious doubt on evidence used to convict him in the cold-blooded shooting of a Brooklyn rabbi. "I'm overwhelmed. I feel like I'm under water, swimming. Like I said from the beginning, I had nothing to do with this case," David Ranta said after leaving state court in Brooklyn. Emotional relatives gathered around Ranta, including a daughter who was an infant at the time of his conviction and is now pregnant.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Sam Wood, PHILLY.COM
A Canadian drug broker, who supplied "massive" amounts of marijuana on consignment to a Philadelphia-based trafficker, pleaded guilty today to drug and money laundering charges. The broker, Dung Ngoc Nguyen, 53, may never have been caught if it hadn't been for a domestic dispute between the trafficker, John Q. Le, and his girlfriend. According to court documents, Nguyen took orders for marijuana from her home in Ontario from Le, who lived in West Chester and reputedly ran one of the largest drug distribution operations on the East Coast.
NEWS
November 24, 2012
Vladka Meed, 90, a courier and weapons smuggler for the Jewish resistance in Poland during World War II who published a harrowing early chronicle of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, died Nov. 21 at her daughter's home in Paradise Valley, Ariz. The death was confirmed by her son, Steven Meed. The cause was Alzheimer's disease. Mrs. Meed was born Feigel Peltel in Warsaw on Dec. 29, 1921. After Germany invaded Poland in 1939, she and hundreds of thousands of other Jews were systematically rounded up and forced into a squalid Warsaw ghetto of one-square mile.
NEWS
October 14, 2012 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
New versions of $100 bills scheduled for circulation next year were stolen Thursday during or after a flight from Dallas to Philadelphia, the FBI said. A law enforcement source said $20,000 was stolen from a total shipment of several million dollars. The plane, which was not identified, arrived about 10:25 a.m. at Philadelphia International Airport, Special Agent Frank Burton Jr. said Friday. A courier service transporting the money reported the theft about 2 p.m. when its employees arrived at the Federal Reserve Building in East Rutherford, N.J., Burton said.
NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New versions of $100 bills scheduled for circulation next year were stolen Thursday during or after a flight from Dallas to Philadelphia, the FBI said. A law enforcement source said $20,000 was stolen from a total shipment of several million dollars. The plane, which was not identified, arrived about 10:25 a.m. at Philadelphia International Airport, Special Agent Frank Burton Jr. said Friday. A courier service transporting the money reported the theft about 2 p.m. when it arrived at the Federal Reserve Building in East Rutherford, N.J., Burton said.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
AmerisourceBergen Corp., the Valley Forge drug wholesaler that is 27th on the Fortune 500 list, made its biggest foreign step Tuesday by announcing it has agreed to buy World Courier Group Inc., a privately held global specialty-transportation and logistics provider for the biopharmaceutical industry, for $520 million in cash. The globalization of large U.S. businesses is almost a given these days, but it doesn't apply to every company in the same way. AmerisourceBergen had more revenue - $80 billion - than any of the pharmaceutical companies it handles products for, but had only a small presence outside the United States, in Canada and Wales.
SPORTS
September 23, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Those who witness Saturday night's ATP Champions Tour Shootout at the Wells Fargo Center will see something most U.S. tennis fans haven't over the last decade - American men with Grand Slam titles. The fab four competing here - Pete Sampras, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, and Jimmy Connors - combined to capture 34 majors. That's 34 more than U.S. males have won since 2003, when Andy Roddick took the U.S. Open. Whether this drought is the result of cyclical factors, the game's globalization or something systemic has become a popular topic of tennis debate and one that defies easy answers.
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