FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 2010 | By Larry Eichel and Claire Shubik-Richards
Philadelphia officials recently announced a new campaign to collect the staggering amount of bail owed by defendants who have missed court dates over the last several decades. The laudable effort is designed to impose greater consequences for failure to appear in court and to produce more revenue for the city. The millions of dollars in outstanding bail are a symptom of a larger problem: the troubling number of defendants who do not show up for their court dates. Our recent Pew Charitable Trusts study, "Philadelphia's Crowded, Costly Jails: The Search for Safe Solutions," found that about 30 percent of city defendants released before trial miss their court appearances.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - The Vatican is pressing its opposition to gay marriage, insisting Saturday that children should grow up with a father and a mother after Italy's high court upheld a lower court ruling and granted custody of a child to his gay mother. In its decision Friday, the Court of Cassation said there was no "scientific certainty or experience-based data" to support the father's claims that the child's development was being damaged by living with his mother and her female partner.
NEWS
December 14, 2009 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Craig Jackson was just 15 when he shot at three West Philadelphia teenagers within a matter of days, police said, wounding one. At 16, police said, Jackson let loose another volley of bullets, firing at five people gathered on a North Philadelphia street. He hit two. Four shooting incidents. Eight targets. Three people shot. Lots of witnesses. A slam dunk? Not exactly. In fact, by the time Assistant District Attorney Peter Erdely was assigned the Jackson file, the entire prosecution was in deep trouble.
NEWS
December 17, 2007
WHAT'S WITH Philadelphia Family Court? The city is pleading with fathers to have more of an active role in raising their children, but when a loving father goes to court to have time with his child, to be part of the child's life, the court allows him two visits per month. What's wrong with this picture? How does a father have an active role in a child's life with two days out of a month? I'm willing to listen to any rational explanation of this; however, there are none. Kathleen Ludy, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 17, 1986
The Feb. 2 editorial following the Inquirer series "Disorder in the court" offered a four-point mandate for reform: merit selection of judges, strengthening the Judicial Inquiry and Review Board, a more reform-minded bar association and, finally, public participation in a court-watching program. The Citizens Crime Commission supports that agenda, and I agree with your basic contention that, unless this is the kind of judiciary we want, "the constituencies must join together to demand change now. " However, I take issue with your statement that court watching has not been tried here.
SPORTS
January 13, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Steve Sader advanced to the quarterfinals of the National B Court Tennis Championship with a 10-2 victory over fellow Philadelphian Bill Diamond yesterday at the Racquet Club. All matches in the 18-player field consisted of one 10-game set because the facility has only one court. Sader performed soundly, keeping the ball well in play and hitting it to best advantage. He moved from 1-1 to 5-1 and ran out from 5-2. Harry Hare of Philadelphia also gained the quarterfinals by defeating Steve Poskanzer of Boston, 10-6, after putting out Barney Tanfield of Philadelphia, 10-1.
SPORTS
September 30, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York yesterday upheld a lower-court decision against baseball club owners, making it unlikely there will be any changes in the sport's economic system this winter. In a 3-0 vote, the court ruled that the owners' Player Relations Committee tried to illegally eliminate free agency, salary arbitration, and the anti- collusion provisions of the expired collective-bargaining agreement. "The unilateral elimination of free agency and salary arbitration followed by just three days a promise to restore the status quo," Judge Ralph Winter wrote.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | BY HOLLY OTTERBEIN
PHILADELPHIA's court system, the First Judicial District, is enacting reforms to make it easier for people to challenge court debts they believe are inaccurate. Legal advocates say the changes, scheduled to take effect in about six weeks, will give poor people a better chance at fighting debts. Last year, court officials announced plans to crack down on debtors, who owed the district a combined total of about $1.5 billion in forfeited bail, restitution and other court costs.
SPORTS
June 7, 1996 | By Mayer Brandschain, FOR THE INQUIRER
Joe Altman defeated third-seeded David Jespersen, the 1994 titleholder, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2, in the third round of the Philadelphia Clay Court Tennis Championship last night at the Cynwyd Club. Altman, a Lancaster Catholic High School graduate about to enter William and Mary College, now faces an Audubon schoolboy, Adam Seri. Top-seeded Young Min Kwon, pro at Eastern Racquet Club in Medford, N.J., and a former champion, fought uphill to go ahead, 1-6, 6-4, 5-2, against George Zink, also of Lancaster, when fading light at 8:45 p.m. caused them to break off action.
SPORTS
October 7, 1992 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The next step for Brian Kennedy, a star senior running back at Father Judge High, will be a Philadelphia courtroom. Today, according to Annette Kennedy, the player's mother, a lawyer retained by the family will seek an injunction in the Court of Common Pleas, the Daily News has learned. The lawyer, Dennis Abrams, of the Bryn Mawr firm of Lowenthal & Abrams, will ask the court to order the Catholic League to restore Kennedy's eligibility for league games. Annette Kennedy decided to pursue the action last night after hearing that the league's principals had denied her son's second appeal for eligibility.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Molly Brownstein, a Pennsylvania State University senior, and her family describe her roommate Rachel Lader as a classic mean girl - a "monster" and an "expert bully, with a Ph.D. in intimidation. " Lader denies this and paints Brownstein as a coddled whiner, quick to turn to her parents to solve problems she created with her own standoffish behavior. Such squabbling might normally be dismissed as a typical drama between young women navigating life on their own for the first time.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in January that states including Pennsylvania must resentence those given mandatory life-without-parole terms as juveniles, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams has signaled that parole will be the primary, perhaps only, means of release for the city's 300 or so juvenile lifers, the largest such population in the world. Now, a federal judge who remanded two cases, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, has said such a resentencing scheme - accomplished by pairing a minimum sentence, such as 35 years, with a maximum of life - would violate the high court's ruling.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Joe McGinniss Jr. tells intense, rapid-fire stories about an America that seems permanently down on its luck. The novelist, who grew up in Swarthmore, made his literary debut with 2008's The Delivery Man , about a trio of young Las Vegas natives who get sucked into criminality. Its searing portrait of a lost generation earned it comparisons to Bret Easton Ellis' Less Than Zero . McGinniss' sophomore effort, Carousel Court , is about the toll the foreclosure crisis takes on a young Southern California couple.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
With the world watching four years ago, Jerry Sandusky kept silent, opting not to testify in his defense before a jury that labeled him a serial sexual predator. He is to return to the same Centre County, Pa., courtroom Friday in a bid to overturn that conviction. But this time, the former coach has vowed to take the witness stand - and force his victims, prosecutors, and defense lawyers to do the same. Sandusky's lawyer says their testimony will expose the case as a "modern-day Salem witch trial" that he says led to the conviction of an innocent man. The arguments aren't novel, and the odds of success are long.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Seven months after Pennsylvania officials settled an ACLU lawsuit over treatment delays for mentally ill people awaiting trial, the Philadelphia courts have moved a first handful of defendants from prison to medical care. Seven people in the custody of the Philadelphia prisons were ordered transferred Wednesday to one of three new mental health facilities in the city, according to Gregg Blender, a lawyer in the mental health unit of the Defender Association of Philadelphia. Blender said all seven were nonviolent offenders recommended by the state Department of Human Services to city prosecutors as candidates for release into treatment.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Sports-betting fans in New Jersey may finally have run out of luck. A federal appeals court on Tuesday rejected the state's attempt to legalize sports betting for the third time in three years. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, ruling in Philadelphia, said that the state's initiative to legalize sports betting at casinos and race tracks - an effort to revitalize the faltering casino industry - breached the federal Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA)
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has rejected Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's last-minute bid to delay her perjury trial. The decision, delivered in a one-line order Friday, means that jury selection is expected to begin Monday in Norristown. Kane, 50, is charged with perjury, obstruction, official oppression, and other crimes. She has pleaded not guilty. This week she filed an emergency petition to the Supreme Court , requesting that the charges against her be dropped.
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