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March 17, 2010 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
OPRAH IS COMING to Philadelphia. But not to give away cars. The talk-show queen and owner of much of the free world is expected at the end of March for court and could spend two weeks here defending a defamation case linked to a sex-abuse scandal at her South African girls' school. The trial is set to start March 29. Oprah's attorneys say in recent filings that she must attend as a named defendant and has rearranged her TV- production schedule to do so. It also appears likely that she'll testify.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Kevin M. Tucker yesterday postponed indefinitely the scheduled May 12 promotions of an estimated 100 police officers because of a continuing legal battle. Tucker notified police over the department's computer network that the promotions were in limbo "in view of the fact that the Commonwealth Court has failed to render a final decision in the Bonner case. " Lt. James Bonner is one of seven police lieutenants seeking to retain that rank after being promoted from sergeant.
NEWS
March 30, 1988 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
An associate of former Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Kenneth S. Harris was convicted yesterday by a federal court jury of extorting $500 in 1986 from a defendant in a drug case that was assigned to Harris. The maximum sentence that the defendant, Thomas Henshaw, 56, of the 3600 block of North 11th Street, could receive is 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000. U.S. District Judge Louis C. Bechtle scheduled sentencing for May 17. Henshaw, who was convicted on the single count of extortion after the jury deliberated for about two hours yesterday and Monday, is the fifth person convicted as a result of a federal and local investigation of case-fixing in Harris' courtroom during 1986.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Clay Caldwell, 36, killed his 40-year-old former girlfriend to keep her from testifying against him at a pending assault trial, said the prosecutor, Assistant District Attorney Terri Domsky said Caldwell broke into Cheryl Goldsby's Lawndale home and beat and stabbed her to death on Jan. 12. Caldwell's trial for assaulting Goldsby was scheduled for later this month. Domsky said that after the brutal murder, Caldwell, of Bailey Street near Montgomery Avenue, stole pictures depicting the bruises on Goldsby's face from the beating he allegedly inflicted on her last Oct. 28. Homicide Detective Raleigh Witcher said Goldsby's wallet, personal papers and car were also stolen.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Mike Leary, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patsy and Gerard Tinnelly were so sure their demoliton company had won a multimillion-dollar contract to dismantle an outmoded power station in 1985 that they stopped taking on new work. The job did not go to the Tinnellys' company, however, even though it was the low bidder. Instead, Northern Ireland Electric, a state-run utility, mysteriously awarded the lucrative contract to a shaky Scottish company that soon went bankrupt. Bigotry on the part of Protestant-dominated unions at the power station was to blame, say the brothers, who are Catholic.
NEWS
June 23, 2010
THANKS TO Christine Flowers for her brilliant June 18 column on the Boy Scouts. I've been working with the scouts for years, and it's truly an incredible program for boys. If people could only see from the inside out - the learning and building of such great citizens that takes place - they would have a totally different view. Jerry Rafter, Wallingford Why doesn't the city simply sell the property to the Boy Scouts? Everybody would win. The city wins by making money on the sale and collecting property taxes in future years.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A patent case decided in federal court Thursday spoke as much to the shifting sands of corporate alignment as it did about the arcane issues of infringement on the formula for the muscle relaxant Amrix. The case began in 2008 and pitted two groups of companies. One group included Teva Pharmaceuticals Inc., which as major operations in North Wales. The other side included Cephalon Inc., which has its headquarters in Frazer. Last month, Teva bought Cephalon. Teva's group came out ahead with U.S. District Judge Sue Robinson in Wilmington.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
Last week, the New Jersey Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case that will determine what happens to seven frozen embryos remaining from a marriage that ended in divorce. It is a case that joins two of the worst aspects of American culture - the collapse of marriage and an idolatrous obsession with technology - with the greatest affliction of our political life: turning over decisions on crucial moral issues to unelected judges. In 1992, J.B. and M.B (their identities have not been disclosed in the case)
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | By Jonathan Gelb INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
You have to do a little looking to find the Ten Commandments. They hang on an outside wall of the Chester County Courthouse in West Chester, on a worn bronze plaque 6 feet high. A fixture since 1920, when a church group put it there, the plaque has gotten scant attention from passersby, perhaps because it is set among bronzed signs also bearing commandments: "No Smoking" and "No Skateboarding. " But a 72-year-old atheist named Sally Flynn noticed it. Last summer, she summoned the American Civil Liberties Union to sue the county on her behalf to remove the plaque.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | By Tomoeh Murakami, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Virtua-Memorial Hospital Burlington County, which twice failed to win township approval for a $17 million expansion, will return to the Zoning Board with plans. Virtua-Memorial officials had appealed to the Law Division of state Superior Court in Mount Holly after township officials in April rejected the expansion for a second time. The hospital said construction of a three-story intensive-care unit was up against time constraints, prompting the court appeal last month. But because of promising settlement discussions with township representatives, the court case is on hold.
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NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she could buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last year, Gina Connor saw her doctor only when it was "unavoidable. " With most of her income going to caring for her child and paying the mortgage and utility bills, Connor relied on over-the-counter remedies for some five years to see her through. But doctor visits became "unavoidable" for colds and other ailments, Connor had to pay out of pocket. "It was expensive, depending on what was done," said the 38-year-old Upper Darby resident.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - In a case that could further define the limits of free speech online, the Supreme Court heard arguments Monday in the appeal by an Allentown man who claimed First Amendment protection following his arrest for threatening on Facebook to kill his wife and an FBI agent. A U.S. District Court jury sitting in Philadelphia convicted Anthony Elonis in 2011 of violating a federal law barring threats over the Internet, mail, or telecommunications systems. Elonis claimed that his posts were a means of self-expression and that he was entitled to the same license employed by rap musicians using violent images in their recordings.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
For some, a question mark has hung over the split verdict a jury delivered four months ago in the federal ticket-fixing case against five former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges. But in an opinion released Friday, the judge who presided over the case left no question as to what he believed prosecutors had proved in court. "The evidence at trial demonstrated very clearly that defendants were influenced by 'extrajudicial communications' when reaching their decisions on select tickets," U.S. District Judge Lawrence F. Stengel wrote.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Chester County magistrate accused in a ticket-fixing conspiracy alongside five former judges of Philadelphia Traffic Court took the witness stand Monday and said the six words he had waited months to tell a jury: "I never asked for a fix. " During nearly three hours on the stand, District Judge Mark A. Bruno portrayed himself as a community leader and a model jurist, ignorant of any wrongdoing that might have been going on in Traffic Court....
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their names - on a government witness list released in May - landed with a thud that sent tongues wagging in Philadelphia political circles. Federal prosecutors signaled that they would extend grants of immunity to City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and four Democratic ward leaders in exchange for their testimony against five former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges currently on trial for an alleged ticket-fixing conspiracy. But as the government concluded its case last week, nearly all of those potential witnesses with ties to city politics escaped a stint on the stand.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
NOW, IT'S just seven defendants who will face trial in federal court on accusations that they participated in a widespread ticket-fixing scheme in Philadelphia Traffic Court. Businessman Henry "Eddie" Alfano, 68, pleaded guilty yesterday to charges of conspiracy and various counts of wire and mail fraud before U.S. District Judge Lawrence Stengel. According to his plea memorandum, Alfano "commonly arranged to 'fix' traffic citations for his friends and business associates. To do so, Alfano used his longstanding connection to retired Traffic Court Judge Fortunato N. Perri, Sr. " Perri had pleaded guilty last year to his role in the scheme.
NEWS
May 17, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The legal fight over marriage equality arrived in a Philadelphia federal courtroom Thursday, as a lesbian couple urged a U.S. judge to overturn parts of a 1996 state law barring recognition of their out-of-state union. But as U.S. District Judge Mary McLaughlin weighed arguments Thursday, her interest seemed to center on one question: How far did the U.S. Supreme Court intend to go last year when it struck down portions of the federal Defense of Marriage Act? The high court's majority opinion in U.S. v. Windsor appeared on one hand to maintain the authority of individual states to define marriage within their borders.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Of all the evidence amassed in the federal case against nine former Traffic Court judges, there is one batch of recordings lawyers for South Philadelphia businessman Henry "Eddie" Alfano fear most. And they sure weren't made by the FBI. This week, Alfano's defense sought to block prosecutors from bringing the purported porn stash of former Judge Fortunato Perri Sr. - or any reference to it - into court when Alfano's case heads to trial in May. Perri pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy and mail and wire fraud last year, but Alfano has maintained his innocence.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
NASHEEN ANDERSON'S online posting of court documents and comments that could have endangered crime victims was "vile, wrong and ugly," a judge said yesterday, despite concluding that the teen should not be tried as an adult. After waiving his right to a preliminary hearing in Family Court and speaking with his mother and attorney, Anderson, 17, was allowed to plead guilty as a juvenile to felony witness intimidation and terroristic threats, a misdemeanor. The District Attorney's Office last month filed a motion requesting that the court try the Martin Luther King High student as an adult.
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