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Court Fees

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NEWS
January 21, 1990 | By Michele M. Fizzano, Special to The Inquirer
Stacked in the Paoli offices of District Justice Armand Pomante is a pile of court fees, including fines, bail and settlement costs that date back as far as last summer but still have not made their way to the county courthouse for processing. No one knows exactly how much money is actually waiting to be processed. What is known is that there simply aren't enough people do to the work. "They just haven't had sufficient staff to follow procedures," said district justice court administrator Kathy Cox. According to Cox, the Paoli court lost three of its six clerks in September.
NEWS
February 10, 2005 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edward Andrew Harris and Miriam Katinos are self-described horse lovers. But their shared passion for all things equestrian landed them on opposite sides in a war over a Franklin Township horse farm. Another chapter in the saga of Joseph Stuebing's horse farm came to a close yesterday when a municipal judge fined Harris $800, plus $155 in court fees, for assaulting Katinos. In December, a state Superior Court judge dismissed an animal-cruelty case against Stuebing, ruling that the SPCA's search of his farm in October 2003 was illegal.
NEWS
February 26, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Ralph Nader has jumped into the presidential race, contending that he wants to energize third-party politics. But angry Pennsylvania Democrats say Nader should first settle his legal bills from his last presidential campaign. And until he does, lawyers from Pittsburgh have persuaded a Washington judge to freeze $61,000 in Nader's personal bank accounts. Nevertheless, a defiant Nader said that this year he would once again seek a place on the Pennsylvania ballot, and in an interview he delivered a sharp dig at the state.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charlestown has been ordered to allow a developer to build an access road to a subdivision and pay $10,000 in legal fees to the property owner. Last week, Chester County Court Judge Thomas G. Gavin ended the five-year court battle with an eight-page decision that enforced an agreement the township and the developer, MCF Associates Inc., had worked out in April. The landowner, Pauline S. Baugh, originally had agreed to sell 76 acres to MCF Associates. Most of the land - about 71 acres - was in Tredyffrin Township, with about five acres spilling over into Charlestown.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 300-plus-year-old Philadelphia Clerk of Quarter Sessions Office formally died Tuesday as Mayor Nutter signed legislation abolishing its powers and duties. The move represented "one more tangible piece of proof that government can be reformed," the mayor said, emphasizing his pledge to make city government more efficient and transparent. The office was one of four city offices led by independently elected officials. While the office no longer exists, there are no immediate cost savings.
NEWS
October 16, 1996 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Brooklyn, N.Y., man who represented himself to court officials last week as the king of the Gypsies in winning the release of two alleged scammers is not affiliated with any official Gypsy group, a spokesman said yesterday Witold "Victor" Lakatosz appeared in District Court here, posted $1,340 in cash, and gave his word as the Gypsy leader that the defendants would never again enter the township. But Ian Hancock, chairman of the 32-nation International Romani Union, said the president of the Romani people - better known as Gypsies - is Rajko Djuric.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
A dispute over funding to modernize courts statewide has resulted in the layoffs and firings of 18 employees involved in a seven-year-old automation effort. The staffing cuts are a blow to the state Judicial Computer Project, which had introduced computerization to the district justice system and was proceeding with a sweeping upgrade of Common Pleas Courts. The recently approved 1994-95 state budget contains a $13 million appropriation for the project, but there is a glitch.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
The city agreed yesterday in federal court to make sure it doesn't again run out of money to pay court-appointed lawyers assigned to poor defendants. Samuel C. Stretton, a Center City attorney, called the agreement "a major victory for the defendants' constitutional rights. " "You have to assure poor people the same trial rights as rich people," he said. The city in the spring ran out of money reserved in its budget to pay the court-appointed counsel, and therefore stopped payments for lawyers, as well as fees for investigators and specialists needed for their defense.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
COLUMNIST John Baer's hit piece on Gov. Corbett and Budget Secretary Charles Zogby failed to mention that the state's Marcellus Shale drillers pay the highest net corporate- income tax in the country, that Marcellus Shale is the No. 1 job creator in Pennsylvania and that increased natural-gas production is lowering cost of energy for businesses and homeowners. He also failed to mention that "green" businesses and the Forgotten Taxpayer both funded the anti-drilling lobbyist, Penn Future.
NEWS
August 2, 1994 | by Randolph Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Divorce is emotionally draining, but it needn't waste all the savings you need to start a new life. How about a divorce for $167.50? That's how much Philadelphia attorney Lawrence Rutenberg charges to file uncontested divorces in rural Cameron County, where court fees are only $54.50. It's cheaper to hire a lawyer to file court papers by mail in the state's divorce capital than it is to do it yourself in Philadelphia. Rutenberg would charge $285.50, including $195.50 in court costs, to handle uncontested divorces in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For much of the last four years, Shelton Thomas assumed the identity of Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams in a bizarre scheme to bilk more than $95,000 from a World War II veteran whose lawn he mowed. On Monday, Thomas' world could not have gotten more real - sentenced to 161/2 to 33 years in prison by a Philadelphia judge for draining the life savings of 93-year-old Raymond Campbell. Thomas, 49, who knew Williams and his family growing up in the same Cobbs Creek neighborhood - but who looks nothing like the city's top prosecutor - sucked in his breath as Common Pleas Court Judge Rayford A. Means imposed the maximum possible sentence.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
In September, Montgomery County began going after the thousands of people who were delinquent in paying court fees, fines, and restitution. Ten months later, the office has collected more than $1.2 million on cases dating to 1986. "The enormity of the results has been surprising to everyone," said Clerk of Courts Ann Thornburg Weiss. Since offering people the chance to escape a collection agency and pay what they can afford, Weiss' office has seen "exponential" growth in collections.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pamela Harris is an Illinois mother who takes care of her adult son, Joshua, who has a disabling condition. And with Monday's U.S. Supreme Court decision in the case bearing her name, Harris' advocacy against public-sector unions could have far-reaching consequences for organized labor, and for a particular and growing class of workers - those who provide home care for people with disabilities. "I don't want my home being a union workplace," Harris said in an online video. She also doesn't want to pay fees to the union - and in its 5-4 decision, the court ruled she doesn't have to. "We are reviewing the decision to determine what impact [it]
NEWS
March 3, 2011
COLUMNIST John Baer's hit piece on Gov. Corbett and Budget Secretary Charles Zogby failed to mention that the state's Marcellus Shale drillers pay the highest net corporate- income tax in the country, that Marcellus Shale is the No. 1 job creator in Pennsylvania and that increased natural-gas production is lowering cost of energy for businesses and homeowners. He also failed to mention that "green" businesses and the Forgotten Taxpayer both funded the anti-drilling lobbyist, Penn Future.
NEWS
March 2, 2011 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia city controller and a top judge pledged Tuesday to garnish the pay of 622 city employees who have forfeited bail in criminal cases, owe court fees, or must pay restitution to crime victims - unless they come up with the money voluntarily. The officials are targeting the city workers as they begin a campaign to collect $1.5 billion in back court debt. City workers are delinquent on a small portion of that - $1 million. "It's almost inconceivable that 622 Philadelphia city employees - who should know better - owe the courts an estimated $1 million in delinquent fines and court fees," said Municipal Court President Judge Marsha Neifield.
NEWS
October 13, 2010 | By Marcia Gelbart, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 300-plus-year-old Philadelphia Clerk of Quarter Sessions Office formally died Tuesday as Mayor Nutter signed legislation abolishing its powers and duties. The move represented "one more tangible piece of proof that government can be reformed," the mayor said, emphasizing his pledge to make city government more efficient and transparent. The office was one of four city offices led by independently elected officials. While the office no longer exists, there are no immediate cost savings.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A New Jersey state trooper, acquitted this week of the most serious charges involving a collision that killed two sisters, pleaded guilty yesterday to minor motor-vehicle violations in the case. Robert Higbee, 37, of Somers Point, was charged with double counts of vehicular homicide in the Sept. 27, 2006, deaths of Jacqueline Becker, 17, and Christina Becker, 19. While chasing a speeder, he drove his police cruiser at 65 m.p.h. in a 35 m.p.h. zone and ran a stop sign at Stagecoach and Tuckahoe Roads in the Marmora section of Upper Township.
NEWS
January 30, 2009 | By Nancy Phillips INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by a city agency's handling of tens of millions of dollars in court fees, the president judge of Common Pleas Court has ordered it to surrender its bank accounts and cede some key functions to another department beginning today. Citing severe financial problems in the office of Clerk of Quarter Sessions Vivian T. Miller, President Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe said the office must turn over its books to the probation department, which will take over fiscal operations. Dembe said the office had botched its handling of key accounts, depriving the city of needed revenue at a time of fiscal crisis.
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