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NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
When the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Monday in the nation's most closely watched immigration lawsuit, Libia Rodriguez will be among the expected thousands of demonstrators at the court's white marble steps. The case, United States v. Texas , could be a life-changer for Rodriguez, 31, an undocumented Mexican immigrant who lives in Coatesville with her husband, also here illegally, and their three U.S.-born children. Depending on the justices' ruling, the couple could put aside their worries of being sent back to Mexico.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | Staff
Parquet Courts Human Performance (Rough Trade ***1/2) Texas-born, Brooklyn-based indie foursome Parquet Courts have maintained a busy schedule since debuting with the cassette-only American Specialities in 2011, releasing five studio albums and two EPs (though two were recorded under the band's alter-ego name, Parkay Quarts). The punk spirit that animates the work of songwriters Andrew Savage and Austin Brown (and Sean Yeaton, who steps up with Human Performance 's excellent ode to dislocation "I Was Just Here")
NEWS
April 16, 2016
It was good to see Gov. Christie finally end his six-year attempt to make the New Jersey Supreme Court a partisan minion, but his latest nominee to the court raises questions that deserve thorough scrutiny by the state Senate before he is confirmed. Walter F. Timpone, a prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office from 1984 to 1994, raised controversy in 2001 when federal agents investigating U.S. Sen. Robert Torricelli feared he had tipped off Torricelli that one of Timpone's legal clients had been asked to wear a hidden microphone in a meeting with the senator.
BUSINESS
April 15, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for the defunct Foxwoods casino project in South Philadelphia lost their bid in bankruptcy court to recoup the $50 million license fee Foxwoods paid in 2007. In a 64-page ruling Friday, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Magdeline D. Coleman rejected the Foxwoods group's arguments under bankruptcy code and said she did not have jurisdiction over certain other counts, which belong in state court. A lawyer for the Foxwoods group - formally known as Philadelphia Entertainment & Development Partners L.P. - said he would recommend that his client appeal the bankruptcy issues to U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 14, 2016
Teen pleads guilty to fatal stabbing A 19-year-old woman has pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the fatal stabbing of another teen during a Hunting Park brawl last year. Keyarra Frisby admitted last week in Common Pleas Court that she stabbed Anita Cotton, 17, in the neck during a melee outside the Walgreens store at 4201 N. Broad St. in the early hours of July 5. Judge Lillian Ransom set sentencing for June 6. Assistant District Attorney Kristen Kemp said Tuesday that Frisby faced at least five to 10 years in state prison.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Ronnie Polaneczky
THERE THEY were on Tuesday morning, at opposite sides of Courtroom 1105 in the Criminal Justice Center: Two young women, each a mom to three children, face to face on the eve of the first anniversary of the worst year of their lives. Dominique Lockwood, 30, shook as she read a victim-impact statement describing how her life has changed since her angel-faced 4-year-old, Abdul Latif Wilson (his family calls him Latif), was killed by a hit-and-run driver on April 13, 2015, in Southwest Philly.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie plans to nominate former federal prosecutor Walter Timpone to the New Jersey Supreme Court, a move that could end a years-long stalemate by filling the court's last vacant seat with a Democrat. Joined by Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) at a Statehouse news conference Monday, the Republican governor said he and Sweeney, who have long battled over the court's composition, had reached a "bipartisan agreement. " "There's no secret that I would have preferred to nominate a Republican, and I did, a number of times," Christie said.
NEWS
April 8, 2016
The freewheeling former Philadelphia Traffic Court, where tickets were fixed for gifts of crab cakes and porn or just to keep political bosses happy, could soon be officially relegated to the history books where it belongs. As voters contemplate whether to abolish a court that brought so little justice and so much embarrassment to the city, they should consider the real justice that was visited upon the court. Traffic Court was so corrupt that a federal jury found four of its judges guilty of lying to a grand jury or the FBI in a sprawling ticket-fixing case.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Facing sentencing Wednesday on federal tax fraud charges, former Traffic Court Judge Michael J. Sullivan offered an unusual argument to the court: Come on, really? Yes, the judge had paid most of the staff at his family bar in South Philadelphia under the table in cash, his lawyer said. And yes, he pleaded guilty last year to failing to report $48,089 in payroll taxes over 11 years. But in a city burdened by violent crime and serious public corruption, defense attorney Henry Hockeimer asked, don't federal authorities have anything better to investigate than a neighborhood bar where employees never made more than $30 to $40 a shift?
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