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BUSINESS
November 23, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Communications Commission can move forward with its review of Comcast Corp.'s proposed $45 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable Inc. without disclosing confidential programming contracts, a federal appeals court said Friday. The FCC had no comment on Friday but was evaluating how to continue with its exhaustive regulatory review. The agency stopped its merger review on Oct. 3 to obtain more information from Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Charter Communications, all of which are involved in the complex deal.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In the latest in a string of litigation defeats for Gov. Corbett, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ordered the administration to reverse course on plans to close one-third of the state's county-based health centers. In its ruling late Thursday, the court sided with union-backed nurses and ordered the Corbett administration to halt what it called the "unlawful closing" of centers primarily in rural areas as part of a reorganization and cost-saving effort. Officials with SEIU Healthcare PA said it was a victory for public health services in a state that trails many others in the number of rural health professionals and funding levels.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Family Court marked its move Monday into a shiny new $222 million courthouse with a new policy requiring juvenile detainees to be strip-searched before going to their court hearings. The policy lasted about as long as the ceremonial ribbon cut by court officials. By Tuesday morning, the strip-search policy had been abolished after complaints from child advocates who questioned the propriety and constitutionality of the procedure. "It did occur, and it was ceased," Charles Cunningham, the Defender Association of Philadelphia's first assistant, said Friday.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, over the objections of its chief justice and another member, this week vacated an order suspending without pay a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge who was acquitted by a federal jury of all charges in a ticket-fixing case. A similar order issued by the Court of Judicial Discipline remains in effect against Michael J. Sullivan, a South Philadelphia tavern owner and former ward leader who became administrative judge of Traffic Court. In September, Sullivan petitioned the high court to partially vacate the February 2013 order and award him back pay as well as pay until his term ends at the end of 2017.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
Children as young as 11 years old were allegedly strip searched in full view of other kids when they entered the new Family Court building this week, according to sources, but when court administrators learned of the practice they put a stop to it. The new Family Court building at 15th and Arch streets just opened this Monday, but for a building that was mired in controversy during its construction, this was yet another sticky, ugly hurdle....
BUSINESS
November 18, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Simon Property Group , the Indianapolis-based retail giant that owns 200-plus shopping malls nationwide, is sacrificing more than 400 parking spaces at its King of Prussia Plaza and Court to make room for at least 50 new stores and restaurants that it hopes will draw more wealthy shoppers to the region's biggest retail complex. At extra-large shopping centers such as King of Prussia, at least, "the mall business is good, contrary to some of the naysayers," David Contis , president of Simon Malls and a corporate senior vice president, told me Monday.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | BY RICHARD L. HASEN
  THE SUPREME Court's surprising decision last week to hear a new challenge to the Affordable Care Act has once again focused attention on Chief Justice John Roberts, who cast the deciding vote in a 2012 decision that saved Obamacare from being declared unconstitutional. Many court watchers expect that he will once again be the swing vote in deciding a case crucial to the health-care law, this one involving questions about who qualifies for subsidies under the law. But Roberts' vote in a recent voting-rights case suggests he might not step in to save the health law this time.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Virginia man charged with kidnapping a 22-year-old Germantown woman pleaded not guilty to the crime in federal court Friday. Delvin Barnes, 37, was ordered held without bail until his trial on January 12, according to court documents. He was indicted Thursday by a grand jury on charges of kidnapping and transporting Carlesha Freeland-Gaither to Jessup, Md. Freeland-Gaither was found in Barnes' car and rescued by federal agents last week. According to court documents, Barnes admitted to abducting her after he was captured, and Freeland-Gaither identified him as her captor.
NEWS
November 13, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge who immigrated to the United States as a child and spent years as a public defender and civil rights lawyer in Philadelphia is President Obama's latest pick to join the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. The White House on Wednesday announced the nomination of U.S. District Judge Luis Felipe Restrepo, 53, to fill the appeals court's lone vacancy. He now faces another round of Senate confirmation, less than a year after he went through the process for his current judicial post.
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