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April 25, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Commissioner Stephanie Singer's name will not appear on the May 19 primary election ballot, Commonwealth Court ruled Thursday. The court rejected Singer's appeal of a Common Pleas Court ruling March 30 striking her name from the ballot. Singer needed at least 1,000 signatures from registered Democrats on nomination petitions to be listed on the ballot. She filed 1,485 but a review during a legal challenge found that just 996 were valid. That left her four names short in her bid for a second four-year term.
NEWS
April 24, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
PROTESTERS, police and lawyers packed a tiny courtroom in the basement of the Criminal Justice Center yesterday for the trial of 10 people accused of disorderly conduct stemming from their arrests at a March incident during which protesters stormed a community meeting in Lawncrest. Extra security was on hand as the crowd overflowed into the hallway. After what transpired in the courtroom angered them further, the group moved outside to 13th and Filbert streets holding signs and chanting, "F--- the police.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
COMMONWEALTH Court yesterday dismissed a lawsuit accusing the state of failing to adequately and equitably fund Pennsylvania public schools. The complaint was filed by six school districts, seven parents, the Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools and the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, who said they plan to appeal to the state Supreme Court. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia executive director Jennifer Clarke, a member of the legal team representing the plaintiffs, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham and Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writers
A lawsuit contending that Pennsylvania's system of school funding is broken will move to the state's top court, attorneys vowed Tuesday after a lower court dismissed the case brought by school districts, parents, and advocates. Lawyers said they would appeal to the state Supreme Court after the Commonwealth Court ruled that education funding was a legislative issue and not a legal matter. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," said Jennifer Clarke, executive director of the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia, part of the team that represents petitioners in this case.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
A fortune in 1930s gold coins seized by the federal government from the family of a deceased Philadelphia jeweler must be returned, a federal appeals court said Friday. For more than a decade, the U.S. Treasury Department insisted, and persuaded a jury, that the rare coins had been stolen and belonged to the government. But on Friday it lost the argument and the coins - because of paperwork. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit said the government had failed to file a timely forfeiture action, and therefore had waived its right to keep 10 rare 1933 $20 double eagle gold coins.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 15 years, Gary Lowenthal has donated to one candidate - and only twice. He gave a friend, Michael George, $500 in a 2001 race for Adams County Court judge. In January, he gave to George again. That donation was a thousand times larger. "Without the support of the people in Pittsburgh or Philadelphia - and that's the money centers - I don't think he'd have the opportunity to get on the trail and tell his story and let the voters decide," Lowenthal said Friday about the biggest donation this year in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court race.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | Chris Brennan, Inquirer Staff Writer
T. Milton Street Sr., the former Pennsylvania state senator who served time in federal prison for unpaid taxes, will remain on the May 19 Democratic primary ballot for mayor, according to Commonwealth Court. A panel of three judges - Bonnie Brigance Leadbetter, Renee Jubelirer Cohn, and Patricia A. McCullough - on Thursday rejected an appeal seeking to remove Street from the ballot because he was registered as an independent when he filed March 10 to run as a Democrat. "There was never any doubt in my mind," said Street, who represented himself in the case.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writer
The state Judicial Conduct Board filed disciplinary charges Wednesday against one current and three former Philadelphia Traffic Court judges, the latest action involving the disgraced and defunct court. The complaint charged Judge Michael J. Sullivan and former Judges Michael Lowry, Thomasine Tynes, and Kenneth Miller with violating the state constitution and judicial conduct rules in a massive ticket-fixing scandal. All four were indicted in a January 2013 federal case charging them with giving preferential treatment to politically connected defendants.
NEWS
April 17, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A month before the primary election, millions of dollars are flowing into the unprecedented race to fill three seats on Pennsylvania's Supreme Court. Topping the money list of the 12 candidates is Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Kevin Dougherty, thanks in part to a group not typically associated with the high court: organized labor. Of the $707,931 he had collected through March, more than half came from laborers and at least $302,000 from one union: the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - led locally by his politically influential older brother, John "Johnny Doc" Dougherty.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writers
ATLANTIC CITY - As he promised, Glenn Straub's rented mobile generators arrived on South Metropolitan Avenue outside the powerless Revel building Tuesday morning, but they were not hooked up by the end of the day. The city continued levying $5,000 a day in fines against Straub, who bought Revel for $82 million a week ago and saw the power shut off two days later in a dispute with the defunct casino-hotel's energy supplier, ACR Energy. Dale Finch, the city's director of licenses and inspection, said Tuesday that Straub had not applied for the permit required to operate the generators.
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