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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she noticed the tiny blood spots on her sheets, Peg Fagan thought the itchy, raised area on her shoulder was a spider bite. So when her doctor asked during a routine checkup in April whether Fagan had any health concerns, she mentioned the bite. The doctor took a sample to biopsy. A few days later, Fagan got a call saying she had to come in to the office. "I said, 'No, I don't,' " remembered Fagan, 56, a breast cancer survivor. "If you are going to tell me that I have cancer, just tell me. " Fagan had melanoma, the most serious kind of skin cancer.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Comcast Corp. and California accountant Conan O'Rourke, who has sued the cable-TV giant for defamation, did not reach a settlement on Wednesday, according to a Northern California court filing. O'Rourke, who lives in San Jose, sued Comcast in late 2014 in federal court claiming that its controller, Lawrence Salva, had gotten him fired from his job at PricewaterhouseCoopers L.L.P. when O'Rourke complained about overcharges on his cable bill. U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul Singh Grewal mediated the settlement conference.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wal-Mart has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a December decision by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court to approve a $151 million class-action award to employees in the state for unpaid wages and damages. In 2006, a Philadelphia Common Pleas Court jury awarded Michelle Braun, a former employee, and nearly 188,000 other employees damages after some complained that the retail giant did not pay them when they worked off the clock or while they were supposed to be on breaks. In its March 13 petition to the Supreme Court, Wal-Mart said the trial jury and Pennsylvania court decisions were wrong because the company had been subjected to "trial by formula," with a few plaintiffs' allegations applied to the whole group.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
Until she could buy health insurance on healthcare.gov last year, Gina Connor saw her doctor only when it was "unavoidable. " With most of her income going to caring for her child and paying the mortgage and utility bills, Connor relied on over-the-counter remedies for some five years to see her through. But doctor visits became "unavoidable" for colds and other ailments, Connor had to pay out of pocket. "It was expensive, depending on what was done," said the 38-year-old Upper Darby resident.
NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pastor Willie Singletary, a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge, rolled up to the federal courthouse Thursday with a tour bus filled with churchgoing supporters, wearing a dapper dark suit and with his vocal cords primed to deliver the sermon of his life. In a reach-to-the-rafters performance before U.S. District Judge Lawrence F. Stengel, the 33-year-old recounted his rise to the bench and pleaded for mercy in a preacher-like cadence while invoking everything from his thwarted childhood desires to play Nintendo to recent racial strife between the black community and police.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
AN IMPASSIONED plea for clemency from a preacher who is a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge garnered a lot of "amens" but failed to move a federal judge Thursday. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Stengel sentenced Willie Singletary to 20 months in prison for his role in a "ticket-fixing" scandal. "I have made some foolish and stupid decisions," Singletary said. "But all I want to do is help people. " More than 80 supporters packed the courtroom. Most hailed from Consolation Baptist Church in South Philly, where Singletary is the pastor.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
FREEHOLD, N.J. - Gov. Christie said Tuesday that Democratic lawmakers will block him from filling a lingering vacancy on the New Jersey Supreme Court for the rest of his time as governor, which he said impedes his ability to tamp down property taxes by changing funding mandates for school districts with poor students. At a town hall-style meeting, the Republican governor described his fight over a school-funding formula that the Supreme Court has upheld as the biggest frustration of his tenure.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in less than two years, the Christie administration was in federal appeals court Tuesday, trying to establish the right to have sports betting at ailing Atlantic City casinos and horse tracks. Lining up against New Jersey were the NCAA and the four major U.S. professional sports leagues, which have attempted to block the state's sports gambling dreams since it authorized the betting in 2011. Gov. Christie and legislators designed the law to comply with a 2013 appeals court ruling that suggested that federal law did not prevent states from repealing - fully or partially - laws that ban sports betting.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE CURIOUS case of Kathleen Kane took center stage in Philadelphia yesterday. The state Supreme Court heard spirited arguments in a packed City Hall courtroom over whether a grand-jury investigation into Kane, the state's first female attorney general, had unfolded on sound legal ground. If you're new to this mind-boggling story, it goes something like this: * Last fall, Montgomery County Judge William Carpenter appointed a special prosecutor, Thomas Carluccio, to lead a grand-jury investigation into allegations that Kane's office had leaked information to the Daily News about a 2009 grand-jury investigation into former Philadelphia NAACP head J. Whyatt Mondesire.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said she was "cautiously hopeful," and answered virtually no other questions. Then, Pennsylvania's first female attorney general took a long, slow walk out of City Hall on Wednesday, surrounded by a swarm of reporters and cameras. Kane, the first elected Democrat to hold the second-most-powerful statewide office, had just emerged from a back row in a Supreme Court courtroom, where she listened as lawyers presented oral arguments in a case whose outcome could spare her from, or condemn her to, criminal prosecution.
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