CollectionsCourt
IN THE NEWS

Court

NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
THOMASINE TYNES, the former Philadelphia Traffic Court president judge named as one of five local officials who allegedly took bribes in an aborted sting operation, yesterday became the first person charged criminally in the sordid affair. District Attorney Seth Williams, in announcing the arrest of Tynes, 71, proclaimed that the grand-jury investigation into political corruption is ongoing and that the former judge may not be the only one to face justice. He urged those with information about political corruption to come forward.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Craig R. McCoy, and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Seamus P. McCaffery stepped down Monday, nearly a month after becoming entangled in a pornographic e-mail scandal that has toppled other state officials, and facing an ethics investigation that could have cost him his seat and pension. In a two-paragraph letter, the 64-year-old Philadelphia Democrat told Gov. Corbett that he was retiring after 40 years in public service, including six as a justice. "It has all been a great honor and privilege, which I deeply cherish," he wrote.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The damage former Justice Seamus P. McCaffery did to the credibility of Pennsylvania's highest court by engaging in juvenile, if not illegal, conduct could be mitigated by his resignation - which, thankfully, he submitted Monday. McCaffery - who recently dropped an unrelated defamation suit against the Inquirer and Daily News - apologized last week for sending more than 230 pornographic e-mails to associates over a nearly four-year period. But he tried to downplay his outrageous conduct as simply a lapse in judgment.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Colleagues say Robert Byer practices law with the precision of a diamond-cutter: Disciplined, dispassionate, and led by keen intelligence. "Beyond brilliant," said his college roommate, Philadelphia lawyer Jeffrey Pasek. An appellate expert, Oxford scholar, and former Commonwealth Court judge, lawyer for Ford Motor Co., Columbia Pictures, and Travelers Insurance, he has now been appointed special counsel to the fractured and fractious Pennsylvania Supreme Court. Byer, 62, is the court's attorney, its legal representative and adviser at a chaotic moment when the justices have suspended one of their own, Seamus McCaffery, in an evolving scandal over e-mailed pornography.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
After weeks of turmoil and recrimination, Monday's announcement that Seamus McCaffery would step down from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is an important move toward restoring the credibility of a court badly shaken by internal intrigue and allegations of impropriety. That is the view of many lawyers who practice before the court, who say further infighting would have severely hampered the court's ability to function. Nancy Winkelman, a partner at Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis L.L.P.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
It was as simple as pressing a button and playing a tape. That's how Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams on Thursday described the decision to bring the first, "but not the last," charges in the undercover sting investigation he revived that captured five Philadelphia Democrats on tape accepting money or gifts. In charging former city Traffic Court Judge Thomasine Tynes with bribery, Williams said the evidence was "clear, convincing, and compelling. " Tynes can be heard accepting a $2,000 Tiffany bracelet from the sting's undercover operative while he lobbied her for a court contract, Williams said.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a profession that burnishes an image of dispassion and decorum, what's happening with the Pennsylvania Supreme Court is like a food fight at a very public banquet. Lawyers, academics, and bar association officials sit dumbstruck, embarrassed to watch, afraid to look away, even more afraid of what might be coming next. "My hope is that I never have to hear one more word about this again, but I'm afraid that I'm going to," said Richard B. Klein, a retired judge of 36 years, 28 years on Philadelphia Common Pleas Court, eight on Superior Court.
NEWS
October 23, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Tuesday told Justice Seamus P. McCaffery to turn over computers and other court-issued equipment, and moved swiftly to cancel the Internet service it provides at McCaffery's Northeast Philadelphia home. The order came a day after the justices voted to suspend McCaffery, citing allegations that he sent or received sexually explicit e-mails among other concerns. Jim Koval, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania courts, said McCaffery and his staff had been asked to surrender all court equipment "posthaste" and that his home Internet account would be shut down this week.
NEWS
October 22, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
IT ALL FINALLY got to be too much for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, which yesterday suspended Justice Seamus McCaffery. The other justices tried to stay out of McCaffery's long-running feud with Chief Justice Ron Castille, who must step down at the end of this year because he has reached age 70. The thinking before: Ride it out and the state's highest court will settle down once Castille retires. The thinking now: There is a "compelling and immediate need to protect and preserve the integrity" of the court, three of the seven justices declared in an order.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|