CollectionsCourt
IN THE NEWS

Court

NEWS
March 21, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pastor Willie Singletary, a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge, rolled up to the federal courthouse Thursday with a tour bus filled with churchgoing supporters, wearing a dapper dark suit and with his vocal cords primed to deliver the sermon of his life. In a reach-to-the-rafters performance before U.S. District Judge Lawrence F. Stengel, the 33-year-old recounted his rise to the bench and pleaded for mercy in a preacher-like cadence while invoking everything from his thwarted childhood desires to play Nintendo to recent racial strife between the black community and police.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer stewarr@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
AN IMPASSIONED plea for clemency from a preacher who is a former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge garnered a lot of "amens" but failed to move a federal judge Thursday. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Stengel sentenced Willie Singletary to 20 months in prison for his role in a "ticket-fixing" scandal. "I have made some foolish and stupid decisions," Singletary said. "But all I want to do is help people. " More than 80 supporters packed the courtroom. Most hailed from Consolation Baptist Church in South Philly, where Singletary is the pastor.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
FREEHOLD, N.J. - Gov. Christie said Tuesday that Democratic lawmakers will block him from filling a lingering vacancy on the New Jersey Supreme Court for the rest of his time as governor, which he said impedes his ability to tamp down property taxes by changing funding mandates for school districts with poor students. At a town hall-style meeting, the Republican governor described his fight over a school-funding formula that the Supreme Court has upheld as the biggest frustration of his tenure.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the second time in less than two years, the Christie administration was in federal appeals court Tuesday, trying to establish the right to have sports betting at ailing Atlantic City casinos and horse tracks. Lining up against New Jersey were the NCAA and the four major U.S. professional sports leagues, which have attempted to block the state's sports gambling dreams since it authorized the betting in 2011. Gov. Christie and legislators designed the law to comply with a 2013 appeals court ruling that suggested that federal law did not prevent states from repealing - fully or partially - laws that ban sports betting.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE CURIOUS case of Kathleen Kane took center stage in Philadelphia yesterday. The state Supreme Court heard spirited arguments in a packed City Hall courtroom over whether a grand-jury investigation into Kane, the state's first female attorney general, had unfolded on sound legal ground. If you're new to this mind-boggling story, it goes something like this: * Last fall, Montgomery County Judge William Carpenter appointed a special prosecutor, Thomas Carluccio, to lead a grand-jury investigation into allegations that Kane's office had leaked information to the Daily News about a 2009 grand-jury investigation into former Philadelphia NAACP head J. Whyatt Mondesire.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said she was "cautiously hopeful," and answered virtually no other questions. Then, Pennsylvania's first female attorney general took a long, slow walk out of City Hall on Wednesday, surrounded by a swarm of reporters and cameras. Kane, the first elected Democrat to hold the second-most-powerful statewide office, had just emerged from a back row in a Supreme Court courtroom, where she listened as lawyers presented oral arguments in a case whose outcome could spare her from, or condemn her to, criminal prosecution.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - In a lively 90-minute session, a panel of judges on Wednesday considered the fate of the leader of Pennsylvania's Open Records Office. But looming larger in this closely watched, likely precedent-setting case is the issue of executive authority over independent agencies. A seven-member panel of Commonwealth Court heard arguments before a standing-room-only crowd about whether Gov. Wolf acted within his power when, shortly after taking office in January, he removed Erik Arneson as executive director of the Open Records Office.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A whistle blower's lawsuit against the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission should be reinstated because a judge's dismissal ignored crucial facts, the whistle blower's attorney told the Pennsylvania Supreme Court on Wednesday in Philadelphia. Ralph Bailets, a former financial manager for the commission, says he was fired in November 2008 in retaliation for his complaints about fraud, overcharges, and political cronyism in an $82 million contract for a financial reporting system. Bailets' complaints about the contract with Ciber Inc., a Colorado technology firm, also figured in a grand jury investigation that resulted in criminal charges against eight turnpike officials, employees, and contractors in 2013.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
LAWYERS representing six Pennsylvania school districts, parents and education advocates argued yesterday that state courts must hold the Legislature accountable for providing adequate funding for public education. The arguments before a panel of Commonwealth Court judges in Harrisburg were to determine whether the lawsuit should move forward. The plaintiffs, which also include seven parents from Philadelphia and the NAACP, claim the state has not provided sufficient funding for most students to pass mandatory graduation exams.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday said Gov. Christie's "moribund" affordable-housing agency had failed to do its job, and effectively transferred the agency's regulatory authority to lower courts. The ruling brought something of a resolution to a decade of litigation over the agency's proposed rules to determine municipalities' housing obligations for low- and moderate-income residents. For years, developers, cities and towns, environmentalists, and the state have wrestled with how to create affordable housing in a state where hundreds of thousands of residents struggle to pay the rent.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|