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Courtroom Drama

NEWS
September 29, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Lawyers predict that high courtroom drama will unfold in the coming weeks at the federal retrial of six former members of Five Squad, a once-elite city police narcotics unit, who are accused of stealing more than $400,000 from drug dealers. "I think you're gonna see sparks fly," said one attorney familiar with the case, an attention-grabber because it focuses on alleged longstanding police corruption that authorities say made an earlier war on drugs in the city something of a farce.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1993 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
Seduction is the theme, from a steamy tale set in Southeast Asia to another set in London, to Madonna's courtroom drama, in this week's new movies on video. THE LOVER (1992) (MGM/UA) $94.99. 103 minutes. Jane March, Tony Leung. An elegant and eloquent adaptation of Marguerite Duras' acclaimed novel about the sexual awakening of a young woman in French colonial Saigon. It is sexually candid, but Jean-Jacques Annaud consistently demonstrates the difference between eroticism and pornography and in an intimately observed relationship, souls as well as bodies are laid bare.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Staging a courtroom drama in a real courtroom can be a risky situation. First, there is the built-in echo of a high-ceilinged room to contend with. Then, the normally flat lighting intrinsic to old-timey courtrooms sorely diminishes the opportunities for creative display. And, in the case of City Hall's Courtroom 253, where the Scranton Public Theater production of "Inherit the Wind" opened on Friday evening, the recurring rumble of the subway trains deep under the building rarely coincides with the thunder of the legal lights within.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
We really shouldn't be surprised that former "Top Gun" Tom Cruise, entering a new and unsteady phase of his career, has decided to re-enlist. Cruise is back in the Navy - in fact, he's in practically the same movie, again starring as a brash, talented young officer with a father hangup. This time he's smart-mouthed Navy lawyer Daniel Kaffee, handpicked by the brass to defend two Marines accused of killing another Marine in a prohibited hazing incident. The case does not excite Kaffee, who dislikes the military and enlisted only to honor the memory of his father, a Navy man who became a famous trial lawyer.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rarely are cops and lawyers as good-looking, efficient and articulate as they appear on television. Most viewers are smart enough to understand that. But somehow, the spectacularly popular CSI shows have managed to smudge the line between small-screen fiction and real-life fact. For the last few years, jurors have been exhibiting something legal experts have identified as the "CSI effect. " Loosely defined, it is a jury's increasing demand for scientific evidence of guilt - and it has changed the strategies that lawyers must employ.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2010
Theater 12 Angry Men Courtroom drama about a jury where one holdout tries to convince the other jurors of his point of view. Ritz Theatre Company, 915 White Horse Pike, Oaklyn; 856-858-5230. $20-$30. Closes 10/9. All in the Timing Six one-act plays that offer a humorous look at relationships. Allens Lane Art Center, 601 W. Allens Ln.; Box Office: 215-248-0546. $18 advance; $20 day of show. Closes 10/16. An American Tragedy Greed, ambition & romance collide in this production adapted from Theodore Dreiser's novel.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge I. Raymond Kremer has had the rug pulled out from under him by a fellow jurist and is not sitting still over this moving experience. The outspoken Kremer sent a memo to all Common Pleas judges on Tuesday, citing his ouster from Courtroom 1115 at One East Penn Square, across from City Hall, to make room for Common Pleas Judge Richard B. Klein, who has chambers in that building. The change was approved by Administrative Judge Edward J. Blake. "The act of bumping a fellow judge out of a courtroom he had been sitting in for years, for some period of time, is divisive and is not calculated to encourage good relations or cooperation," said Kremer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1996 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Primal Fear is a courtroom drama so filled with sidebar issues that it winds up trying your patience as well as a murder case. Gregory Hoblit, who has won many Emmys for his work on Hill Street Blues, L.A. Law and NYPD Blue, makes an uncertain big-screen debut in much-traveled terrain. He builds his case around the much-invoked and endlessly controversial abuse excuse. In Primal Fear that alibi becomes an excuse to stray all over the place. Primal Fear covers a lot of ground, and even though the running time is a profligate 130 minutes, it can only touch superficially on themes that could consume entire movies by themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
rop-fmt2-nlf,5,41The embattled defense attorney knows that the prisoner before the court in Murder in the First is irrefutably guilty of cutting the throat of another inmate, and so does everyone else. Confronted with an open- and-shut case, he takes the bizarre step of putting the prison itself on trial. The prison is the notorious penitentiary on Alcatraz Island and the year is 1941 - a time, it must be said, when it was a lot easier to plead for compassion and rehabilitation for criminals than it is now. Murder in the First flies bravely in the face of windy and self-serving political rhetoric against crime.
NEWS
August 21, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Religion. A topic whose button is so hot, it starts wars and is banned in polite party conversation. It was the religion angle that sealed the deal for Court TV, which will cover the capital murder trial of Rabbi Fred J. Neulander. Jury selection began yesterday in the Camden Hall of Justice. The trial promises drama enough to make any TV producer drool: a wife bludgeoned in her comfortable suburban home; an adulterous affair involving a respected community leader and a glamorous celebrity; hired hit men from the sketchy fringes of respectable society.
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