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Courtroom Drama

NEWS
August 31, 1990 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
A fiesty Sinead O'Connor disguised herself in a baseball cap and shoulder- length wig Wednesday to get a closeup look at those demonstrating against her outside her concert at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. She then took the stage and lashed back at her critics. The pop star, who refused to perform a week ago at New Jersey's Garden State Arts Center if the national anthem was played, mentioned the name of a demonstrator, Scott Lonsberry, an Albany, N.Y., radio talk show host, noting: "It is against the law to accuse a person of being a Nazi.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
When you get right down to it, "Presumed Innocent" is really just an elaborate version of the standard courtroom drama - souped-up Perry Mason. On the other hand, this is as good as Perry Mason gets. Courtroom drama buffs will recognize the familiar elements and characters - overmatched prosecutors, dramatic last-minute confessions, trusty investigators and a defendant incriminated by a damning amount of circumstantial evidence. There are some clever subplots and complicated emotional relationships that overlay the plot, but the movie thrives - in the Perry Mason tradition - on a generous diet of red herrings and a tasty finale.
NEWS
September 29, 1989 | By Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Lawyers predict that high courtroom drama will unfold in the coming weeks at the federal retrial of six former members of Five Squad, a once-elite city police narcotics unit, who are accused of stealing more than $400,000 from drug dealers. "I think you're gonna see sparks fly," said one attorney familiar with the case, an attention-grabber because it focuses on alleged longstanding police corruption that authorities say made an earlier war on drugs in the city something of a farce.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Duke Ellington's jazzy and erotic score sets the tone for Anatomy of a Murder (1959), a provocative courtroom drama starring James Stewart as a lawyer who defends an accused murderer (Ben Gazzara) suspected of killing a barroom brawler after he raped Gazzara's wife (Lee Remick). It will be shown Monday at 7:30 p.m. at Temple University Cinematheque, 1619 Walnut St. MONDAY MOVIES Family Business stars Milton Berle in drama about four brothers coming to terms with their father's estate and their feelings for each other; discussion follows.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge I. Raymond Kremer has had the rug pulled out from under him by a fellow jurist and is not sitting still over this moving experience. The outspoken Kremer sent a memo to all Common Pleas judges on Tuesday, citing his ouster from Courtroom 1115 at One East Penn Square, across from City Hall, to make room for Common Pleas Judge Richard B. Klein, who has chambers in that building. The change was approved by Administrative Judge Edward J. Blake. "The act of bumping a fellow judge out of a courtroom he had been sitting in for years, for some period of time, is divisive and is not calculated to encourage good relations or cooperation," said Kremer.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | By Nancy Meanix, Special to The Inquirer
Courtroom One in West Chester was filled earlier this month with 60 Chester County residents watching the drama of a rape trial unfold. But it was just that - a drama - a mock trial with a plot manufactured from bits and pieces of actual cases. According to Connie Noblet, the executive director of the sponsoring Crime Victims Center of Chester County Inc., the June 9 "trial" was used to educate both the public and her volunteer counselors about the difficulties that rape victims face in the judicial system.
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