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NEWS
May 18, 2011
Judge of Superior Court (10-year term) Vote for one. Democratic David N. Wecht. . . Unopposed Republican (95% of voting districts) Vic Stabile. . . 348,890 Paula A. Patrick. . . 184,507 Judge of Commonwealth Court (10-year term) Vote for one. Democratic (95% of voting districts) Kathryn Boockvar. . . 292,414 Barbara Behrend Ernsberger. . . 294,517 Republican (95% of voting districts)
NEWS
March 3, 2016
THE LONG ODYSSEY of Graterford inmate Marcus Perez continues, but on Tuesday an appeal was filed to seek court permission to correct the wrongful life sentence he received. Perez should "have gotten relief 25 years ago; the claim is obvious," says Michael Wiseman, his court-appointed attorney. Perez's constitutional rights were violated, Wiseman's motion claims. The 45-year-old Perez has spent 26 years in jail, doing life because of bad information he was given by a judge, who urged Perez to take a plea bargain.
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the French, this was a sight unlike any on the European continent. A sea of pristine and perfectly manicured grass tennis courts at the esteemed Philadelphia Cricket Club. For many of these French players, this was their first time on grass. "This is something special," said Emanuelle Ducrot, 37. "You need to adjust your feet every time. Because you expect something and it's completely different. " Ten of the best French tennis players - many in their 50s, 60s, and even 70s - faced their American counterparts this weekend in a competition of International Tennis Clubs, which were founded in the 1920s and intended to promote friendship among nations through tennis.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's spring, and that means that budding Michael Jordans and Larry Birds in Woodlynne can practice their hooks, dribbles and slams at one of the borough's two basketball courts on Fourth Street. It's spring, and that means that toughs - most of them from outside Woodlynne - can practice their beer-guzzling, swearing and loitering at one of the borough's two basketball courts on Fourth Street. Those were the equations in years past, but borough officials and residents are now looking for a way to control who can use the courts, for what, and when.
NEWS
April 8, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local officials in New Jersey should regionalize their municipal court systems not just to save money, but also to eliminate any pressure on judges to levy fines to raise revenues, according to an influential former prosecutor. James J. Gerrow Jr., who co-chairs the state Bar Association's Judicial Administration Committee, recently made that recommendation to a state commission that is studying ways to get the state's 566 municipalities to share services or merge. The commission was appointed last year by Gov. Corzine, who has touted shared services as a way to cut costs and taxes during the recession.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Players hoping to use the Jenkintown High School basketball courts are going to have to start playing by the borough's rules. The school board and Borough Council have devised a plan to solve the problem of overcrowding at the high school basketball courts - the hiring of a monitor to police the courts, making sure that Jenkintown residents are getting their fair share of playing time. The board also agreed to limit the number of nonresidents allowed on the courts. In the last two months, many residents have complained to police and school and borough officials that nonresidents were monopolizing the courts, cutting into residents' playing time.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Juan Gonzalez, Howard Schneider, Gloria Campisi and Gary Thompson contributed to this report.)
Union workers at the Bellevue Stratford got moral support from a sympathetic City Council yesterday in their fight to keep the landmark hotel open. But the final determination on whether the Bellevue remains open past the scheduled closing on Sunday was expected to come from the courts today. Local 274 of the Hotel & Restaurant Employees and Bartenders International Union has petitioned both federal and Common Pleas courts for injunctions that would force the hotel to keep operating.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | ANGUS R. LOVE
I have been reading your editorials and columns for years and have a great deal of respect for your views and those of your Unfortunately, I must object to Zack Stalberg's Editor's Note regarding Judge Norma Shapiro and the prison- cap issue. You offer a simplistic and incorrect view of our criminal justice system and seek to demonize a hard-working, well-intentioned federal judge. I agree there are major problems with criminal justice in Philadelphia. I am also outraged at the anecdotal information you present as evidence of Shapiro's failings.
NEWS
April 29, 2002
WHO IS Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson kidding? Does she think anyone cares about "parameters of the rules of professional conduct and the code of civility"? We all know most lawyers don't care. What I and columnist Michael Smerconish and most normal citizens in Philadelphia care about is whether or not we have idiots serving on our benches. Thanks to Michael, we know we have at least one. Lisa Rau should let this thug and felon live in her house. Tom Schmidt, Philadelphia The father of Shannon Schieber has intimated that his daughter would still be alive if the police had broken down her door after they were called to her apartment by the call reporting a "woman screaming.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Molly Brownstein, a Pennsylvania State University senior, and her family describe her roommate Rachel Lader as a classic mean girl - a "monster" and an "expert bully, with a Ph.D. in intimidation. " Lader denies this and paints Brownstein as a coddled whiner, quick to turn to her parents to solve problems she created with her own standoffish behavior. Such squabbling might normally be dismissed as a typical drama between young women navigating life on their own for the first time.
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in January that states including Pennsylvania must resentence those given mandatory life-without-parole terms as juveniles, Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams has signaled that parole will be the primary, perhaps only, means of release for the city's 300 or so juvenile lifers, the largest such population in the world. Now, a federal judge who remanded two cases, one from Philadelphia and another from Delaware County, has said such a resentencing scheme - accomplished by pairing a minimum sentence, such as 35 years, with a maximum of life - would violate the high court's ruling.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Joe McGinniss Jr. tells intense, rapid-fire stories about an America that seems permanently down on its luck. The novelist, who grew up in Swarthmore, made his literary debut with 2008's The Delivery Man , about a trio of young Las Vegas natives who get sucked into criminality. Its searing portrait of a lost generation earned it comparisons to Bret Easton Ellis' Less Than Zero . McGinniss' sophomore effort, Carousel Court , is about the toll the foreclosure crisis takes on a young Southern California couple.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
With the world watching four years ago, Jerry Sandusky kept silent, opting not to testify in his defense before a jury that labeled him a serial sexual predator. He is to return to the same Centre County, Pa., courtroom Friday in a bid to overturn that conviction. But this time, the former coach has vowed to take the witness stand - and force his victims, prosecutors, and defense lawyers to do the same. Sandusky's lawyer says their testimony will expose the case as a "modern-day Salem witch trial" that he says led to the conviction of an innocent man. The arguments aren't novel, and the odds of success are long.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Seven months after Pennsylvania officials settled an ACLU lawsuit over treatment delays for mentally ill people awaiting trial, the Philadelphia courts have moved a first handful of defendants from prison to medical care. Seven people in the custody of the Philadelphia prisons were ordered transferred Wednesday to one of three new mental health facilities in the city, according to Gregg Blender, a lawyer in the mental health unit of the Defender Association of Philadelphia. Blender said all seven were nonviolent offenders recommended by the state Department of Human Services to city prosecutors as candidates for release into treatment.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Sports-betting fans in New Jersey may finally have run out of luck. A federal appeals court on Tuesday rejected the state's attempt to legalize sports betting for the third time in three years. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, ruling in Philadelphia, said that the state's initiative to legalize sports betting at casinos and race tracks - an effort to revitalize the faltering casino industry - breached the federal Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA)
NEWS
August 7, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has rejected Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane's last-minute bid to delay her perjury trial. The decision, delivered in a one-line order Friday, means that jury selection is expected to begin Monday in Norristown. Kane, 50, is charged with perjury, obstruction, official oppression, and other crimes. She has pleaded not guilty. This week she filed an emergency petition to the Supreme Court , requesting that the charges against her be dropped.
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