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NEWS
May 18, 2011
Judge of Superior Court (10-year term) Vote for one. Democratic David N. Wecht. . . Unopposed Republican (95% of voting districts) Vic Stabile. . . 348,890 Paula A. Patrick. . . 184,507 Judge of Commonwealth Court (10-year term) Vote for one. Democratic (95% of voting districts) Kathryn Boockvar. . . 292,414 Barbara Behrend Ernsberger. . . 294,517 Republican (95% of voting districts)
NEWS
August 27, 2012 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the French, this was a sight unlike any on the European continent. A sea of pristine and perfectly manicured grass tennis courts at the esteemed Philadelphia Cricket Club. For many of these French players, this was their first time on grass. "This is something special," said Emanuelle Ducrot, 37. "You need to adjust your feet every time. Because you expect something and it's completely different. " Ten of the best French tennis players - many in their 50s, 60s, and even 70s - faced their American counterparts this weekend in a competition of International Tennis Clubs, which were founded in the 1920s and intended to promote friendship among nations through tennis.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | By Edward Engel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's spring, and that means that budding Michael Jordans and Larry Birds in Woodlynne can practice their hooks, dribbles and slams at one of the borough's two basketball courts on Fourth Street. It's spring, and that means that toughs - most of them from outside Woodlynne - can practice their beer-guzzling, swearing and loitering at one of the borough's two basketball courts on Fourth Street. Those were the equations in years past, but borough officials and residents are now looking for a way to control who can use the courts, for what, and when.
NEWS
April 8, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Local officials in New Jersey should regionalize their municipal court systems not just to save money, but also to eliminate any pressure on judges to levy fines to raise revenues, according to an influential former prosecutor. James J. Gerrow Jr., who co-chairs the state Bar Association's Judicial Administration Committee, recently made that recommendation to a state commission that is studying ways to get the state's 566 municipalities to share services or merge. The commission was appointed last year by Gov. Corzine, who has touted shared services as a way to cut costs and taxes during the recession.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Players hoping to use the Jenkintown High School basketball courts are going to have to start playing by the borough's rules. The school board and Borough Council have devised a plan to solve the problem of overcrowding at the high school basketball courts - the hiring of a monitor to police the courts, making sure that Jenkintown residents are getting their fair share of playing time. The board also agreed to limit the number of nonresidents allowed on the courts. In the last two months, many residents have complained to police and school and borough officials that nonresidents were monopolizing the courts, cutting into residents' playing time.
NEWS
January 31, 1986 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writers Juan Gonzalez, Howard Schneider, Gloria Campisi and Gary Thompson contributed to this report.)
Union workers at the Bellevue Stratford got moral support from a sympathetic City Council yesterday in their fight to keep the landmark hotel open. But the final determination on whether the Bellevue remains open past the scheduled closing on Sunday was expected to come from the courts today. Local 274 of the Hotel & Restaurant Employees and Bartenders International Union has petitioned both federal and Common Pleas courts for injunctions that would force the hotel to keep operating.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | ANGUS R. LOVE
I have been reading your editorials and columns for years and have a great deal of respect for your views and those of your Unfortunately, I must object to Zack Stalberg's Editor's Note regarding Judge Norma Shapiro and the prison- cap issue. You offer a simplistic and incorrect view of our criminal justice system and seek to demonize a hard-working, well-intentioned federal judge. I agree there are major problems with criminal justice in Philadelphia. I am also outraged at the anecdotal information you present as evidence of Shapiro's failings.
NEWS
April 29, 2002
WHO IS Judge Frederica Massiah-Jackson kidding? Does she think anyone cares about "parameters of the rules of professional conduct and the code of civility"? We all know most lawyers don't care. What I and columnist Michael Smerconish and most normal citizens in Philadelphia care about is whether or not we have idiots serving on our benches. Thanks to Michael, we know we have at least one. Lisa Rau should let this thug and felon live in her house. Tom Schmidt, Philadelphia The father of Shannon Schieber has intimated that his daughter would still be alive if the police had broken down her door after they were called to her apartment by the call reporting a "woman screaming.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The past and present owners of Philadelphia's John Wanamaker department- store chain are trading lawsuits, showing that when it comes to the final selling price, the two can't meet under the Eagle. In fact, they're $57 million apart. Woodward & Lothrop, a department-store company based in Washington, D.C., bought Wanamaker's in December for $183 million, with the final selling price was to be adjusted according to the company's book value as of the closing date, Dec. 31. In April, according to documents filed in the Court of Common Pleas in Philadelphia, Woodward & Lothrop received a report from its accountant, Touche Ross & Co., on Wanamaker's book value, saying that Carter Hawley Hale, Wanamaker's former owner, had overstated the book value by $57.1 million.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 17, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie on Thursday asked the New Jersey Supreme Court to reopen the landmark case that for decades has been the basis for the state's school-funding system, seeking the right to break union agreements that he contends are harming students in poor districts. The governor, who has been pushing to redistribute school aid from urban to suburban districts, is arguing that the current funding system - grounded in the court's Abbott v. Burke rulings - hasn't sufficiently improved poorer school districts.
NEWS
September 16, 2016
THIS WEEK, a group of public-interest lawyers spent hours in a courtroom trying to convince the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that the state is failing to meet its obligations in funding public schools. The justices didn't seem convinced. Lawyers on the other side of the issue - representing the state and the Legislature - argued that the courts had no business getting involved: It was strictly a matter for the Legislature to decide whether Pennsylvania meets the constitutional requirement that it provide a "thorough and efficient system of education.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Some Pennsylvania schools have cutting-edge facilities. Others have no textbooks. The state's education-funding system is so fundamentally flawed that a judicial remedy is needed, parents, school districts, and advocacy groups told the state's highest court Tuesday. Leaving school-funding decisions to Pennsylvania's legislature has resulted in gross inequalities, said Brad Elias, a lawyer for the plaintiffs. "This is unconscionable," Elias said. "It's so far out of the range of reasonableness.
NEWS
September 15, 2016
By Peter F. Vaira The most important task Bruce Beemer must perform in his short but crucial term as attorney general is to clear up the porngate scandal. The bar, the courts, and the public must know what was going on with the mass ex parte communications between state prosecutors and the judges of the courts of Pennsylvania. Prosecutors and former prosecutors I have spoken with are offended by the scandal. The full details have been kept secret for too long. The delay in exposing the limits of this scandal appears to many as another instance of lawyers protecting lawyers.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By John G. Malcolm and Tiffany H. Bates Few presidential elections have featured federal court judges among their top five issues. The Supreme Court's odious decision in the Dred Scott case was a central theme in the 1860 race between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. And the Warren Court was front and center in the 1968 faceoff between Richard Nixon and Hubert Humphrey. This may well be another such year. Court-related issues far beyond who will fill the vacancy created by the unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia loom large.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
With trumpets and speeches, a drum line and song, students, teachers, politicians and others rallied Monday for education funding in advance of an important Pennsylvania Supreme Court hearing on the matter. The high court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit charging that the state has abdicated its responsibility to adequately fund school districts across the commonwealth. Parents, including two from Philadelphia, and districts including the William Penn system in Delaware County sued the state in 2014.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
By Michele L. Jawando The next president could dramatically change the nature of the U.S. Supreme Court for generations to come. As such, voters who care about the direction of this country must base their vote on the importance of the court when they cast their ballot this November. Being a "Supreme Court voter" is different from being a single-issue voter. So many issues that matter to Americans - immigration reform, health care, voting rights, reproductive rights, campaign-finance reform, and core constitutional questions about rights and government power - end up at the court.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
A New Jersey appeals court on Friday ordered a new trial for a former Rutgers University student convicted of using a webcam to spy on his roommate during an intimate encounter. In a 61-page ruling, the court tossed bias-intimidation counts against Dharun Ravi because of changes in state law, and said he was entitled to a new trial on the remaining charges. The three-judge panel agreed with defense arguments that Ravi should not have been charged with bias crimes and that bias evidence was wrongfully used during his trial in 2012.
NEWS
September 10, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
New Jersey's Supreme Court said Thursday that it would hear a challenge that will decide whether municipalities now must zone for the affordable housing units they did not zone for between 1999 and 2015. The court announced it had accepted an appeal by the Fair Share Housing Center, an advocacy group that is seeking to overturn a July 12 ruling by the Appellate Division. The three-judge panel ruled unanimously that municipalities have no obligation to zone for units not created during the nearly 16-year "gap period," when the state failed to devise an acceptable formula for calculating each town's obligation.
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