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NEWS
May 21, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
When Pennsylvania's top judges struggled to find a way to build a new Philadelphia Family Court building, they turned to a lawyer with political savvy and real estate experience. Jeffrey B. Rotwitt, a longtime real estate attorney and developer, spent months scouting for locations, and urged state officials to approve $200 million to build the courthouse. For his efforts, he is poised to earn a handsome fee from the courts: $3.9 million. His firm, the politically powerful Obermayer, Rebmann, Maxwell & Hippel, has received more than $1 million already - with the rest due by the end of June.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | By David R. Boldt, Editor of the Editorial Page
There's been a lot of speculation that some Philadelphia voters are so turned off by the choices presented to them in this election that they will stay home next Tuesday. I don't feel that way at all. In fact, I can hardly wait to get into that voting booth and start flipping levers. A big part of the reason for that has to do with the judges on the ballot. Perhaps never before has there been such a clear opportunity for voters to send the message that something has to be done about the judicial system.
SPORTS
February 12, 2000 | by John Smallwood, Daily News Sports Columnist
Dawn Staley has played on a lot of basketball courts during her career, but one she has missed holds so much meaning for her. Growing up in Strawberry Mansion, Staley was a big-time 76ers fan during the time of Julius Erving, Andrew Toney, Billy Cunningham and of course Maurice Cheeks. Those teams played in the arena now called the First Union Spectrum. Next month, Staley will finally play there. She will be part of the USA Women's Senior National Team, which will continue getting ready for the 2000 Olympics with an exhibition game against the Hungarian professional club team MiZo-PVSK.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | By Kathi Kauffman, Special to The Inquirer
If variety were the measure of greatness, the men's team from Haverford would be the odds-on favorite to win the national championship in its division of the U.S. Tennis Association tournament. The squad, which leaves for Tucson, Ariz., today to play in the weekend event, boasts a bridge builder, a violin maker, a math professor, an engineer and a former amateur boxer. The team can produce a fairly heady resume of on-court accomplishments, too. In August, it won its division in the Middle States championship, in which amateur teams from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware competed in Princeton, N.J. That followed the team's triumph in local playoffs in July.
SPORTS
July 15, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Disappointed by a recent contract offer from the New York Rangers, free-agent center Mark Messier said yesterday he will entertain offers from other teams. The 36-year-old Messier estimated that 15 NHL teams would be interested in signing him. He just completed a three-year, $18 million contract with the Rangers, whom he led to the 1994 Stanley Cup. He admitted in a conference call yesterday that he hoped to get a new contract from the Rangers before last season or during the 1996-97 schedule.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By LESLIE SCISM, Daily News Staff Writer
Ronald Davis said he knew it was going to happen. For a decade, he said, he warned the Family Court judges, the child advocate and the social workers. But it happened anyway. His estranged wife's 5-year-old daughter, Aliyah, was beaten to death with a stick. Police said the mother, Maria Davis Fox, watched her common-law husband, Charles Fox, beat the girl. At the time of Aliyah's death, Maria Davis Fox was on eight years' probation from a manslaughter conviction for the beating death of her 17- month-old son, Saeed, in 1973.
SPORTS
July 26, 1994 | By Mayer Brandschain, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Local coaches had their day in the first round of the National Women's 35- and-over and 45-and-over grass-court tennis championships yesterday at Merion Cricket Club. In the 45-player field of the 35-and-over tournament, the winners included Fran Schecter, Conestoga High School coach, and Sue Burke, the La Salle University coach. Beaver College coach Betty Weiss triumphed in the 57-player 45-and-over field. Of these, Schecter had the toughest match, subduing Claudia Phillips of Santa Fe, N.M., 6-1, 6-2, in a forecourt duel of angled shot-making.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | By Savannah Blackwell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents and borough and school district officials have come to terms on overseeing use of the high school's basketball and tennis courts. At a Tuesday night meeting of the district's property committee, the parties agreed to hire a monitor who will be an employee of the school district, but will be interviewed by Police Chief Robert Furlong and paid, at least for six or seven weeks, by the Borough Council. They agreed that the monitor should work from 5:30 to 10 p.m. during the summer months, when the courts are most packed.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | by Scott Heimer, Daily News Staff Writer
If your windshield was papered up with a parking ticket in South Jersey, don't expect the recent state Supreme Court ruling to cut you a break. New Jersey's highest court ruled that municipal courts had better put the pedal to the metal in chasing parking scofflaws. The court adopted a rule that requires municipal courts to dismiss parking tickets after three years unless the legal process has proceeded to either the arrest-warrant or license-suspension stage. About 545,000 parking tickets statewide would be affected by the ruling, according to the state's Administrative Office of the Courts.
NEWS
February 7, 2011 | By Marcia Gelbart and Jeff Shields, Inquirer Staff Writers
A power struggle over the future of the Philadelphia Sheriff's Office has pitted the Nutter administration against the First Judicial District, with tensions running high as officials scramble to meet a timetable to return to selling foreclosed properties by March. Common Pleas Court President Judge Pamela Pryor Dembe has proposed leaving the Sheriff's Office largely intact and appointing an advisory board to recommend reforms. But the Nutter administration seeks a significant role in daily oversight of the office.
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