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Courtship

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NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
When Craig Ricketts arrived in court yesterday, he was hoping a judge would sentence him to a life term - with his fiancee Olympia Davis. But, after pleading guilty to voluntary manslaughter, Ricketts, 25, of Paschall Avenue near 47th Street, quickly realized he was not in for any honeymoon with Common Pleas Judge Lisa A. Richette. "I'm not going to marry you," snapped Richette, who revealed that Davis had called her to ask that she perform the marriage ceremony. "You will have to get another judge.
NEWS
June 22, 1986 | This article was written by Inquirer correspondent Nicole Brodeur. Also contributing was correspondent Kenneth Glick
It was over linguine, not litigation, that sparks started to fly between Assistant County Prosecutors Mark Singer and Kathy Morrissey. The courtroom courtship - probably one of the best-kept secrets in the Burlington County Court Facility - was made legal June 14 when Singer, of Mount Laurel, and Morrissey, of Maple Shade, were married at the Cafe Gallery Restaurant in Burlington City. The ceremony was performed by Superior Court Judge Paul R. Kramer, who said he did not know what was budding before his bench until the engagement was announced to smirking court employees last August.
NEWS
December 28, 1999
Editor's Note: It's been a too-long good-bye, journalism's wordy farewell to this dying century. Still, we're ending the year by pondering four less-noted aspects of the 1900s that changed how we live: Invention; The Idea of Leisure; The Dating Game; The Rise of Sports. Bah! Humbug! Who really cares about microchips and NASDAQ? Such arcana may fill the history books, but we know what really occupied the minds of 20th century Americans: The opposite sex. Not "sex," because sex, as in the act itself, has been an obsession forever.
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In the notoriously sleazy world of modern movies, marriage and manners are making a comeback. Edward and Bella, still only necking in "Twilight," have done about a billion dollars worldwide, providing a template for movies like "Ode," in which young lovers consummate their feelings with poetry. Older lovers are not to be left out - "Julie and Julia" offered a rare portrait of a durable, happy marriage. Love, respect, romance, partnership, teamwork - "Young Victoria" gives you all that in one package, with a monarchy thrown in. Emily Blunt stars as a teenage Princess Victoria of Kent, next in line in 1837 to the throne of her childless, ailing uncle King William (Jim Broadbent)
NEWS
February 11, 2000 | By David Boldt
Dear Tom, I very much enjoyed our recent father-son chat about the disintegration of Valentine's Day. Your wonderfully ironic comment that it has become "just another opportunity to fail" provided a bittersweet reminder that you are indeed a chip off the sarcastic old block. My own main complaint remains that there is apparently no holiday the American greeting card industry cannot drain of real meaning. There's something strange - even a little perverse - about cards offering Valentine's Day greetings to sons and daughters from mothers and fathers, not to mention every other conceivable form of acquaintanceship.
NEWS
March 3, 1995 | By Karen Heller!, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Poor Jacob waited seven years to wed Rachel! Scarlet endured one Civil War and two loveless marriages before marrying her match in Rhett! But that is nothing - a wink, a nod, a sigh - compared to the exclamation-filled "courtship" of Rex Morgan, M.D. and June Gale, R.N.! After 46 strictly business years, ramrod Rex will stand up in Anton's restaurant tomorrow and ask no-nonsense June to be his wife! ! The thoroughly serious comic strip couple has always had an "implied relationship," says Woody Wilson, who creates the strip with artist Tony DiPreta, making sure that almost no sentence ever ends in anything but an exclamation or question mark.
NEWS
April 19, 2001
Developer Melvin Simon is like a man in a long courtship who can never quite move on to marriage. And the damsel in this case, fair Philadelphia, could be excused for wondering whether Mr. Simon, chairman of Simon Property Group Inc., is one of those guys with a commitment problem. He swept the city off its feet in 1997 with seductive talk of a $174 million family entertainment center at Penn's Landing, a site that had seen its share of fair-weather suitors before. He first told former Penn's Landing executive director James Cuorato (now city commerce director)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Movie Critic
THE EARLY leader for the Worst Title of the Year award is surely "Salmon Fishing in Yemen. " The words seem designed to alienate as many viewers as possible, while pandering to the world's smallest subset of hobbyists. (Remember the bird-watching comedy "The Big Year?" Of course you don't.) There is another audience for the movie, of course, and it's anyone who finds Emily Blunt adorable, which is everyone. "Fishing" features Blunt in "Young Victoria" mode, in a decidedly old-fashioned romance that replaces modern-day vulgarity with the decorum of formal courtship.
SPORTS
March 18, 1993 | By S.A. Paolantonio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eagles owner Norman Braman predicted yesterday that Reggie White, the superstar defensive end who is the grand prize in the free-agent market, will not be playing in Philadelphia next season. In his first public comments since White began his tour of prospective NFL employers, Braman all but slammed the door on White's return to the Eagles, saying that he would not become a prisoner of White's assessment of the team's dedication to winning. "I have no intention of submitting myself to anyone's test - so I guess I fail the criteria that Reggie has placed on me," Braman said, speaking in a matter-of-fact tone but clearly disapproving of what he called White's "soap opera"-like courtship by a half-dozen NFL teams.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Our forebears "were more licentious than we ordinarily imagine them to be," lusty types for whom sex was "part of serious courtship" and often resulted in premarital pregnancy, a historian writes. "Into the 1820s almost all Americans would have subscribed to the commonplace notion that sex, within proper social confines, was enjoyable and healthy and that prolonged sexual abstinence could be injurious to health," Jack Larkin writes in American Heritage magazine's September-October issue.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Timothy Perper, 74, of Bella Vista, a writer and independent researcher on human courtship, died of cardiac arrest Tuesday, Jan. 21, at his home. As a biology professor at Rutgers University in the 1970s, Dr. Perper became fascinated by how couples meet and then decide whether they are attracted to each other. He obtained a grant from the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation to study conversations in bars. His 1985 book, Sex Signals: The Biology of Love , was described in the New York Times as "lively and provocative.
NEWS
September 2, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Economic Opportunity Act approved by New Jersey lawmakers was designed to give tax breaks to a broad range of businesses, including companies outside urban areas and small businesses that create as few as 10 jobs. The 82-page bill, passed last month by the Senate, also contains a provision that lawmakers acknowledge targets a specific company: Subaru. The car manufacturer, which has its U.S. headquarters in Cherry Hill, is expanding and has been on the hunt for a new location, possibly at Philadelphia's Navy Yard.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2012
DEAR ABBY : There is a man at work I'm very attracted to. He seems to be equally attracted to me. The problem is, he has shown me two pictures of his privates that he has on his cellphone. When he did it, it wasn't completely out of context of our conversation and our interest in each other. We do not have a physical relationship (yet), but I'm considering it. How weird is it that he has these pictures on his phone? - Got an Eyeful in Illinois DEAR GOT AN EYEFUL : That must have been some conversation!
NEWS
June 4, 2012
The Cost of Hope A Memoir By Amanda Bennett Random House. 240 pp. $26     Reviewed by Rachel Hadas     Like many memoirs, Amanda Bennett's The Cost of Hope braids several narrative strands together. For starters, there is an unusual and piquant courtship story. Bennett and Terence Foley, a charming, impulsive, and mysterious character, meet in 1983 in the city then still known as Peking. Bennett's a journalist; Foley is not quite who he claims to be. Bennett is winningly frank to admit that the couple' s relationship is tempestuous from the start, but their connection, however stormy, proves strong and enduring.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Movie Critic
THE EARLY leader for the Worst Title of the Year award is surely "Salmon Fishing in Yemen. " The words seem designed to alienate as many viewers as possible, while pandering to the world's smallest subset of hobbyists. (Remember the bird-watching comedy "The Big Year?" Of course you don't.) There is another audience for the movie, of course, and it's anyone who finds Emily Blunt adorable, which is everyone. "Fishing" features Blunt in "Young Victoria" mode, in a decidedly old-fashioned romance that replaces modern-day vulgarity with the decorum of formal courtship.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
MOVE OVER, Judge Willis Berry. While you have served ably as the poster boy for merit selection of judges - by running a real-estate business out of your chambers, for which you were suspended for four months, and petitioned by the Bar Association to step down - there's a new poster boy. Actually, the new poster features a duo: Democratic Party treasurer Frank Oliver and Democratic Party chair Bob Brady. According to a recent Inquirer report, the dynamic duo invited 27 judges who are running for retention to a breakfast meeting, and told the candidates that party support would cost them $10,000 each.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010
DEAR ABBY: I have been married to my second husband, "Greg," for 3 1/2 years. Before we married, Greg took me out on dates, we had wonderful conversations and a satisfying sex life. Now I spend every weekend cleaning, and when I clean the upstairs, Greg goes downstairs. If I clean downstairs, he goes upstairs. He says he loves me, but it seems we have become more like roommates than husband and wife. Greg buys big-ticket items (big-screen TV and a computer, for example) without telling me. In fact, he never discusses anything with me. Do you think he married me only to cook and clean for him?
NEWS
December 17, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In the notoriously sleazy world of modern movies, marriage and manners are making a comeback. Edward and Bella, still only necking in "Twilight," have done about a billion dollars worldwide, providing a template for movies like "Ode," in which young lovers consummate their feelings with poetry. Older lovers are not to be left out - "Julie and Julia" offered a rare portrait of a durable, happy marriage. Love, respect, romance, partnership, teamwork - "Young Victoria" gives you all that in one package, with a monarchy thrown in. Emily Blunt stars as a teenage Princess Victoria of Kent, next in line in 1837 to the throne of her childless, ailing uncle King William (Jim Broadbent)
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The Italian museum's director pulled out a stack of letters and, one by one, laid them atop his desk at the Institute and Museum of the History of Science in Florence. It was late 2007 and appeals were pouring in from museums in China, Korea, Germany, New York, Chicago, and a host of cities around the globe, though the International Year of Astronomy was still more than a year away. "Tutti vogliono il mio telescopio," Paolo Galluzzi said. "Everyone wants my telescope," the only remaining functional telescope made by Galileo Galilei, whom Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics - indeed, of modern science altogether.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2005 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A wistful twist on Rear Window from Brazilian writer-director Marcos Bernstein, The Other Side of the Street is about a divorced 65-year-old who believes she has witnessed a murder, and then sets out to prove it - by tumbling into a tricky courtship with the man she thinks is the perp. Fernanda Montenegro stars as Regina, a grandmother who lives in a Rio de Janeiro high-rise with her old mutt and her mundane rituals. One night, scanning the building across the way with binoculars, she sees an older man give an apparently lethal injection to his wife.
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