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TRAVEL
February 19, 2012
An essential app to have on the front page of your device. You might need it only once, but that one time could save a life. Name: Pocket First Aid & CPR from the American Heart Association Available for: iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad; Android What it does: Catalogs quick, easy-to-understand information so you can respond to and treat a medical emergency before help arrives. Some of the emergencies include choking, seizures, and possible spinal cord injuries.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Tracie Cone, Associated Press
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Relatives of an 87-year-old woman who died after a nurse at her retirement home refused a 911 dispatcher's pleas to perform CPR expressed satisfaction with the care she received, saying her wishes were to die naturally. Meanwhile, the company that owns the facility now says its worker failed to follow proper procedures. Lorraine Bayless' death last week at Glendale Gardens, a Bakersfield independent living facility, prompted outrage after a seven-minute recording of the 911 call was released.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Christian Smuckers, an Amish farming family from Ronks, Pa., have never felt so good about professional golf or so leery of suburban swimming pools. And Mary Bea Porter, an occasional player on the women's pro golf tour, has learned that a concentration lapse during a round of golf can occasionally benefit mankind. These discoveries came Wednesday afternoon in Phoenix while Porter played the 13th hole of the Moon Valley Country Club course, attempting to qualify for a tournament.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | Staff Report
Police are looking for the thief who stole a purse a school counselor left in a stairwell after assisting in giving CPR to a student. East Detectives said the theft occurred about 4:20 p.m. Jan. 6. at the Prima Charter School at 3556 Frankford Ave. in Kensington. The 32-year-old counselor went to the aid of a student having a medical emergency in a stairwell and assisted in administering CPR, police said. She left her purse while the student was taken away and returned minutes later to find it missing.
NEWS
May 2, 2003 | By Dwayne Campbell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A wrongful-death lawsuit was filed this week against Falls Township and its Police Department, alleging that officers denied CPR to a dying man. In the lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Bucks County Court of Common Pleas, the family of Edgar Whitehead said they called 911 in May 2001 after Whitehead began having trouble breathing. Whitehead's wife and brother and a family friend began giving him CPR, following instructions from a 911 dispatcher. But when police arrived at the scene, the suit states, officers grabbed Whitehead's wife and brother and forced them out of the house.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - People who collapse from cardiac arrest in poor black neighborhoods are half as likely to get CPR from family members at home or bystanders on the street as those in better-off white neighborhoods, according to a study that found that the reasons go beyond race. The findings suggest a big need for more knowledge and training, the researchers said. More than 300,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in their homes or other nonhospital settings every year, and most don't survive.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | Associated Press
BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - No criminal charges will be filed after a care worker's attention-grabbing refusal to perform CPR on a resident of a Central California independent-living facility, police said. The Bakersfield Police Department said Wednesday that it had closed its investigation into the death of Lorainne Bayless, 87, who died Feb. 26 at Glenwood Gardens while a nurse there refused a 911 dispatcher's pleas to administer CPR, and ignored repeated requests to find someone else who would be willing.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
High school students in public schools across New Jersey will soon be taught how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use an automated external defibrillator. Acting Gov. Kim Guadagno signed legislation Wednesday that requires school districts and charter schools to include such instruction in their health and physical education curriculum. "I have a 14-year-old son who goes to high school next year," Guadagno said at a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at Burlington Township Middle School.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Her breathing stopped and she had no pulse. She was as good as dead. But Rebecca Hauser, a former stewardess who just turned 23, has much to give thanks for tomorrow. She is living proof of the wonders of medical science, luck, and the kindness of strangers. It began like this: Hauser, who is called "Becky," had just gotten a job working as an usher at the famed "A Christmas Carol" show at Strawbridge & Clothier. Monday, Nov. 13, she goes to the store at 8th and Market streets for a training class.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Here's how simple it can be to bring someone back from the brink of death: It took just a few minutes Tuesday to train dozens of people in hands-only CPR. Eager volunteers, from teens to seniors, leaned over specially designed dummies outside the WHYY studios, pushing firm and fast to music selected to inspire the right speed: 100 beats a minute. As for pressure? The more the better, said Benjamin Abella, the physician who is leading the new Mobile CPR Project Philadelphia. No need to worry about further injuring a person in cardiac arrest, said Abella, who directs Penn's Center for Resuscitation Science.
NEWS
June 7, 2016 | By Daniel J. Hilferty, Kenneth Margulies, and Benjamin S. Abella
Each year, more than 359,000 cases of cardiac arrest - in which the heart suddenly stops working properly - occur across the United States. In Philadelphia, about 1,100 people died from cardiac arrest just last year. Many of those out-of-hospital deaths could have been avoided with a simple solution. Hands-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a lifesaving technique that is useful in many emergencies when someone's heart stops beating, including sudden cardiac arrest or near-drowning.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | Staff Report
Police are looking for the thief who stole a purse a school counselor left in a stairwell after assisting in giving CPR to a student. East Detectives said the theft occurred about 4:20 p.m. Jan. 6. at the Prima Charter School at 3556 Frankford Ave. in Kensington. The 32-year-old counselor went to the aid of a student having a medical emergency in a stairwell and assisted in administering CPR, police said. She left her purse while the student was taken away and returned minutes later to find it missing.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Brodzinski had just hit a double and was on second base Monday night when he looked across the field and saw the umpire collapse. Within seconds, the Delaware County teenager was performing CPR - and maybe saving a life. Ask Brodzinski about it, however, and the 16-year-old volunteer firefighter says it was just part of his job. "I was definitely nervous about messing up, but it was my duty," Brodzinski said Tuesday. "So I got in there and started chest compressions and breaths until other help came.
NEWS
May 7, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RACERS HAVE plenty to focus on during a 10-mile run. How to keep a man's heart beating and lungs pumping isn't usually one of them. But that's exactly what a group of about 12 health-care workers competing in the Broad Street Run went through on Sunday when one of their own collapsed right in front of them. Thanks to their efforts, that 31-year-old man is alive today. After seeing their colleague off in an ambulance, those lifesavers all went on to finish the race. "People stopped out of the kindness of their hearts as soon as he went down," said Kristen, a physician's assistant who didn't want her last name published.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
NEWS
April 19, 2015 | By Aaron Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joey Lancellotti walked into the dugout at Neumann-Goretti last May already distraught over the loss that knocked Archbishop Wood out of the Catholic League playoffs. The news he received from coach Jim DiGuiseppe, however, was much, much worse. "I walked into the dugout, and coach was like, 'I have something to tell you. Your grandfather had a heart attack,' " recalled Lancellotti, now a junior righthanded pitcher for the Vikings. John Ierardi suffered the cardiac event before the game at his home in Bensalem, and his family asked DiGuiseppe not to tell Lancellotti, who pitched that day. "And he's like, my best friend," Lancellotti said.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The story struck a chord with Killeen McCans: Had the 2-year-old's mother not known CPR, the boy who nearly drowned wouldn't have survived. The 15-year-old sophomore at Cardinal O'Hara High School heard the tale from her father, a paramedic, who mentioned that the mother had learned CPR at O'Hara. "It hit me on how much of an impact [CPR training] could have on people's lives," said McCans, who is certified in CPR. At her instigation, 800 O'Hara students filed into the gymnasium of the school in Springfield and Marple Townships on Monday, one period at a time, to learn CPR. "We should have done this a long time ago," said Deputy Chief Eugene Smith of Riddle Hospital EMS, one of the instructors.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of what Glenn McClintock knows about the day his heart stopped, he pieced together later. But what the 62-year-old grandfather knows for sure is that first responders saved his life with CPR and at least five shocks from an automated external defibrillator before he arrived at the hospital. McClintock met the first responders Wednesday for the first time since they helped save his life in October. "It's important to encourage those people and thank those people for their service to others who they don't even know," said McClintock, of Glenmoore.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
High school students in public schools across New Jersey will soon be taught how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation and use an automated external defibrillator. Acting Gov. Kim Guadagno signed legislation Wednesday that requires school districts and charter schools to include such instruction in their health and physical education curriculum. "I have a 14-year-old son who goes to high school next year," Guadagno said at a bill-signing ceremony Wednesday at Burlington Township Middle School.
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