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NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An admitted Southwest Philadelphia drug dealer told a federal jury yesterday that he routinely purchased three to five kilograms of cocaine a month from reputed drug kingpin Alton "Ace Capone" Coles from early in 2003 until summer 2005. Desmond Faison said three of those kilograms usually were converted into small doses of crack cocaine sold by a network of dealers working for him around the Paschall Homes in Southwest Philadelphia. The remainder, he said, was resold to dealers from other parts of the city or from New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Our Jan. 11 entry about a hairline crack in a countertop brought some expert advice and more questions, proving once more that one should never take anything for granite. The hairline crack under discussion was about 22 inches long, and was in front of the sink. The countertops are five years old, and the installer is out of business. Marty Jensen of Blue Bell spent 44 years in the granite business, and, though retired, troubleshoots for trade organizations. He said the crack may be the result of a natural fissure or could be a pressure crack caused by the method of installation.
NEWS
August 4, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
I SAT CUFFED on the couch with tube socks over my hands as the shrinks fired questions at me. "Do you know why you're here, Mr. Jones?" said the one with the phony smile. I ignored him, just like I'd done the others. I wasn't going to spill my guts just because of one little meltdown on Market Street. "Mr. Jones, we're trying to help you," said a female doctor who seemed genuinely concerned. "Don't you want to be helped?" My tough exterior started to crack. I nodded slowly.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro School Board will decide next week whether to hire a Cherry Hill architectural firm to investigate a 6-inch-wide crack that has been spreading along the foundation of the Hawthorne Park Elementary School. The district has been patching the crack in the school's concrete foundation for a number of years, Assistant School Superintendent Marcel Gilbert said Monday night during a board meeting. "We thought the crack was just from settling," he said. "But now we're concerned, because the school has been settling for 20 years.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Drug kingpin Derrick A. Grandison yesterday was jailed for 20 years without chance of parole for selling more than 30 pounds of crack and regular cocaine throughout the city. Grandison, 43, also was fined $100,000. He will be under court supervision for the rest of his life after his release from prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Odell Guyton. U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig, who handed down the jail term, called it a "very lenient sentence" and suggested it would have been more harsh had not the Jamaican-born Grandison pleaded guilty and become an informant against his suppliers and accomplices.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A reputed North Philadelphia drug boss allegedly used his teenage sons for several months in 1991 to deliver crack cocaine to a "select group" of customers who lived in Center City, a federal grand jury has charged. The grand jury said Antonio Santell's other customers had to go to the rear of his home on Orthodox Street near Tackawana, which was open for business around the clock. There, they could put money in a can and wait while the can was pulled to an upper floor, where the money was counted, before they their drugs were returned in the can. At times between January and May 1991 the drug network was grossing about $4,000 a day in crack sales, the grand jury charged.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecution wanted to put on a scale all the drug packets the cops scooped up while arresting Derrick Johnson last Dec. 13. If the weight was more than two grams, Johnson, 28, faced a mandatory year in prison. But the packets never got to the scale. Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola agreed with Johnson's lawyer that there was no sound evidence that the packets had belonged to Johnson. After all, it was dark, and there were plenty of other drug dealers around Myrtlewood and Jefferson streets, tossing bags when police showed up,argued George H. Newman.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
I THINK Signe Wilkinson's "World Parenting Styles" cartoon shows that the artist and the Daily News are extremely ignorant on the problems faced by our young people in the city. I am a principal of an alternative high school in North Philadelphia, and I see children and young adults facing the drug problem every day. Here we have a seven-year-old girl bringing 12 bags of crack to school, and it is turned into a joke. The children of our impoverished neighborhoods face real issues that they have no control of. They face murder and drug trafficking every day, and they have no choice but to live in this horrifying condition.
NEWS
August 4, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
HOW LOW can we go? I'm talking, of course, about today's waistbands. If you thought the belly-baring thing was bad enough, take a look at the sartorial depths to which fashion has now sunk. The L.A. Times has declared it "the summer of the pelvic bone. " Last year's already obscene low-riders have gone the way of high-water polyester pants. Today's hip-huggers have almost nothing but hope to hang onto anymore. The "normal" inseam-to-waist rise of 8 to 9 inches is shrinking faster than Britney Spears' record sales.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the cold logic of urban evolution, can gourmet restaurants and art galleries rout crack? That's the six-figure issue for residents of Spring Garden, a gentrifying neighborhood of stately trees and grand six-figure Victorian homes - but also a neighborhood with a flourishing crack trade on its streets. It was just four years ago that one of the leaders in the gentrification movement predicted that simple economics guaranteed change for the rectangular neighborhood northwest of Center City.
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NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University will crack down on underage drinking and partying in off-campus housing, partly in response to concerns from neighbors who have long complained about rowdy behavior affecting their North Philadelphia community. "This can't go on any longer," Temple president Neil D. Theobald said. The new campaign, announced by Theobald on Tuesday, includes steep fines for underage drinkers and others violating alcohol-related laws. For the first time, Temple will levy fines of up to $1,500 on those who host nuisance parties, provide the alcohol, or have their name on the lease of a house where a party is held.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2016 | By Elliott Sharp, For The Inquirer
Bonnie Raitt entered the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall on Friday with a comment about the lovely spring night in Philadelphia and the season's propensity for "raging hormones" - and then the country blues-rock legend raged through a wonderfully alluring two-hour set of songs old and new. Raitt started the party with her sizzling cover of INXS's "Need You Tonight," which appears on the 66-year-old's fantastic new studio album, Dig in Deep , her...
NEWS
March 25, 2016 | STAFF REPORT
An investigation is underway to determine how a 3-year-old girl was able to get her hands on and swallow an unknown amount of crack cocaine at a West Philadelphia day care center. The incident occurred about 9 a.m. Tuesday the Work of Learning Early day care center on 52nd Street near Haverford Avenue, police said. Police credited a center worker with getting the child quickly to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia after she saw the girl gnawing on a packet with a white residue.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
On a vacant lot beneath Route 1 on Tuesday, a bulldozer lifted its blade high above a bubble-gum-pink clothing donation bin and then brought it down like a hammer. It jabbed, denting the bin's top. It pulled, flipping the bin on its front. And it smashed, pummeling the bin flat. "No more clothing bins," one man yelled, as a crowd of spectators around him cheered. That's a lot of hate for a hunk of metal. But city officials say donation bins like the one pulverized in Nicetown on Tuesday - and up to 70 others the city will remove by the end of the week - disturb the quality of life for those who live near them, attracting graffiti, illegal dumping, and drug activity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2015
Q: I had tile laid in my upstairs bathroom. Unfortunately, the floor is a little springy in this spot, and the grout just crumbles. I have had the floor redone, but the same problem occurred. Is there a more flexible grout that could be used? - J.W. A: How frustrating! I love tile and stone, particularly in bathrooms, but tile really does need a solid backing. I'm surprised your tile installers didn't point that out to you in the first place. It doesn't make these installers look very good, and probably doesn't make you feel comfortable with the rest of the installation.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Weintraub stood behind a podium Tuesday morning near the spot where, 30 years ago, four of his friends were killed in a drunk-driving accident that the Bucks County coroner at the time called "one of the worst I've ever seen. " Weintraub, now the chief of prosecution for the Bucks County District Attorney's Office, was 16 years old at the time of the crash. Now, he had a message for those who might consider driving under the influence over the Thanksgiving holiday, a period notorious for drunk driving.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | BY JEREMY ROEBUCK, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHAKA FATTAH Jr. was convicted yesterday on bank- and tax-fraud charges, a significant setback in his family's ongoing legal fight with federal authorities. It took a jury of eight men and four women a day and a half to affirm prosecutors' depiction of Fattah as a con artist who cheated banks, his own clients and taxpayers out of thousands of dollars to outfit himself in luxury and project a hollow image of a successful businessman on the rise. But if the verdict caused the slightest crack in his seemingly unrelenting confidence, the 32-year-old son of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., did not let on. Fattah remained stoic as the trial's outcome was announced, saying afterward that he was "disappointed" and "looking forward to a vigorous appeal.
NEWS
August 29, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's Bergen Square neighborhood has seen 71 drug overdoses in less than a month, officials say, due in large part to one triangular intersection flanked with empty buildings and trash-strewn lots overgrown with tall grass. On Thursday, police officers and members of the city's Department of Public Works spent hours scouring the intersection of Broadway and Newton Avenue, cutting back knee-high weeds, hauling away trash, tearing down one crumbling house, and serving notices on other dilapidated properties.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Chris Melchiorre, For The Inquirer
There's a distinct rhythm to Carly Testa's pre-at-bat ritual. Two practice swings. Then one foot in the batter's box. She points the bat forward with two hands and holds it for about two beats. Then a deep breath. Then her other foot in the box. She looks up, and then she's ready to go. It's something St. Joseph coach Candi Dean can recall in detail - because it's something Testa has repeated, almost to the smallest movement, before every at-bat of her monster senior season.
NEWS
April 28, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The legislation was largely inspired by a YouTube video. In it, a heavyset man masquerading as a member of the elite Army Rangers was seen shopping at the Oxford Valley Mall in Langhorne last fall when he was called out by an Afghanistan veteran. The impostor wore a Combat Infantryman Badge with two stars, indicating the unlikely feat - for his age - of having served in three wars. He also displayed a U.S. flag patch on the wrong part of the sleeve. And his answers to questions seemed confused.
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