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NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An admitted Southwest Philadelphia drug dealer told a federal jury yesterday that he routinely purchased three to five kilograms of cocaine a month from reputed drug kingpin Alton "Ace Capone" Coles from early in 2003 until summer 2005. Desmond Faison said three of those kilograms usually were converted into small doses of crack cocaine sold by a network of dealers working for him around the Paschall Homes in Southwest Philadelphia. The remainder, he said, was resold to dealers from other parts of the city or from New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Our Jan. 11 entry about a hairline crack in a countertop brought some expert advice and more questions, proving once more that one should never take anything for granite. The hairline crack under discussion was about 22 inches long, and was in front of the sink. The countertops are five years old, and the installer is out of business. Marty Jensen of Blue Bell spent 44 years in the granite business, and, though retired, troubleshoots for trade organizations. He said the crack may be the result of a natural fissure or could be a pressure crack caused by the method of installation.
NEWS
August 4, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
I SAT CUFFED on the couch with tube socks over my hands as the shrinks fired questions at me. "Do you know why you're here, Mr. Jones?" said the one with the phony smile. I ignored him, just like I'd done the others. I wasn't going to spill my guts just because of one little meltdown on Market Street. "Mr. Jones, we're trying to help you," said a female doctor who seemed genuinely concerned. "Don't you want to be helped?" My tough exterior started to crack. I nodded slowly.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro School Board will decide next week whether to hire a Cherry Hill architectural firm to investigate a 6-inch-wide crack that has been spreading along the foundation of the Hawthorne Park Elementary School. The district has been patching the crack in the school's concrete foundation for a number of years, Assistant School Superintendent Marcel Gilbert said Monday night during a board meeting. "We thought the crack was just from settling," he said. "But now we're concerned, because the school has been settling for 20 years.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Drug kingpin Derrick A. Grandison yesterday was jailed for 20 years without chance of parole for selling more than 30 pounds of crack and regular cocaine throughout the city. Grandison, 43, also was fined $100,000. He will be under court supervision for the rest of his life after his release from prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Odell Guyton. U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig, who handed down the jail term, called it a "very lenient sentence" and suggested it would have been more harsh had not the Jamaican-born Grandison pleaded guilty and become an informant against his suppliers and accomplices.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A reputed North Philadelphia drug boss allegedly used his teenage sons for several months in 1991 to deliver crack cocaine to a "select group" of customers who lived in Center City, a federal grand jury has charged. The grand jury said Antonio Santell's other customers had to go to the rear of his home on Orthodox Street near Tackawana, which was open for business around the clock. There, they could put money in a can and wait while the can was pulled to an upper floor, where the money was counted, before they their drugs were returned in the can. At times between January and May 1991 the drug network was grossing about $4,000 a day in crack sales, the grand jury charged.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecution wanted to put on a scale all the drug packets the cops scooped up while arresting Derrick Johnson last Dec. 13. If the weight was more than two grams, Johnson, 28, faced a mandatory year in prison. But the packets never got to the scale. Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola agreed with Johnson's lawyer that there was no sound evidence that the packets had belonged to Johnson. After all, it was dark, and there were plenty of other drug dealers around Myrtlewood and Jefferson streets, tossing bags when police showed up,argued George H. Newman.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
I THINK Signe Wilkinson's "World Parenting Styles" cartoon shows that the artist and the Daily News are extremely ignorant on the problems faced by our young people in the city. I am a principal of an alternative high school in North Philadelphia, and I see children and young adults facing the drug problem every day. Here we have a seven-year-old girl bringing 12 bags of crack to school, and it is turned into a joke. The children of our impoverished neighborhoods face real issues that they have no control of. They face murder and drug trafficking every day, and they have no choice but to live in this horrifying condition.
NEWS
August 4, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
HOW LOW can we go? I'm talking, of course, about today's waistbands. If you thought the belly-baring thing was bad enough, take a look at the sartorial depths to which fashion has now sunk. The L.A. Times has declared it "the summer of the pelvic bone. " Last year's already obscene low-riders have gone the way of high-water polyester pants. Today's hip-huggers have almost nothing but hope to hang onto anymore. The "normal" inseam-to-waist rise of 8 to 9 inches is shrinking faster than Britney Spears' record sales.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the cold logic of urban evolution, can gourmet restaurants and art galleries rout crack? That's the six-figure issue for residents of Spring Garden, a gentrifying neighborhood of stately trees and grand six-figure Victorian homes - but also a neighborhood with a flourishing crack trade on its streets. It was just four years ago that one of the leaders in the gentrification movement predicted that simple economics guaranteed change for the rectangular neighborhood northwest of Center City.
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NEWS
March 29, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
The trash looked as if it had been dropped off in a hurry. Someone apparently drove down the isolated sandy road in the Brendan T. Byrne State Forest in Burlington County, found an open spot, then tossed the construction debris from the back of a pickup truck. On Thursday, the longer, more tedious process of cleaning up the refuse and other nearby garbage sites was undertaken by volunteers, including state officials, as part of efforts to draw attention to a new state crackdown on illegal dumping.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
AIMING TO crack down on losers who point lasers at aircraft, the FBI announced yesterday they'll give rewards of up to $10,000 for tips leading to the arrest of illegal laser pointers. Such incidents have skyrocketed 1,100 percent since 2005, when the FBI and Federal Aviation Administration began tracking the deliberate targeting of aircraft by people with handheld lasers. In 2013, 3,960 laser strikes were reported, averaging almost 11 incidents a day, according to the FBI. The FBI's regional reward program will run for 60 days in 12 FBI field offices, including Philadelphia's.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anna Thompson is a mess. Acne hotspots are breaking through the thick makeup she slathers on first thing every morning. She's a lifelong bulimic who purges on fast-food burgers. Her husband is a passive-aggressive bully, and her sister constantly criticizes her as a failure. Portrayed by Jessalyn Gilsig ( Nip/Tuck , Glee , Vikings ) with an implosive intensity that both alarms and delights, Anna is the unlikely heroine of Somewhere Slow , a terrific low-budget indie romantic dramedy from Wilmington-born writer-director Jeremy O'Keefe.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Drexel University president John A. Fry made the million-dollar-plus club. Fry is one of 42 private college presidents nationwide who were paid more than $1 million in total compensation in 2011, the latest year for which data are available, according to the annual salary survey published by the Chronicle of Higher Education. With a salary of $1.02 million, he placed 41st in compensation among the nation's private colleges. Total compensation includes base pay, bonus pay, deferred compensation, benefits, and other miscellaneous pay. It's the first year Fry's full salary at Drexel has been made public in the report, which draws data from public tax forms.
SPORTS
December 4, 2013 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
VILLANOVA'S basketball team, coming off an unexpected Sweet 16 appearance as a 12 seed, started the 2008-09 season ranked 23rd. The next time the Wildcats weren't in the Top 25 was the last week of February in 2011. They haven't been back since, even though they beat three Top 5 opponents last season. In fact, the best they did was get one vote in the final regular-season poll last March. Now they're back, at No. 14, after beating No. 2 Kansas and No. 23 Iowa on Friday and Saturday to win the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament in the Bahamas.
NEWS
October 18, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
WEST CHESTER - A public works crew pulling up the sidewalk in the heart of West Chester last week heard an unexpected crack. What the workers uncovered is a mystery that has since perplexed the borough. Beneath the bricks on Church Street, they found a glass manhole cover. And beneath that opaque window, they looked down on a hidden room. Another layer down, beneath a film of dirt and dust, they saw a metal chair, a few bottles, and an archway long ago closed by concrete.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
A 4-YEAR-OLD preschooler brought cocaine and $173 in cash to his East Falls school yesterday. The boy had packed his pockets with the money and eight baggies of what appeared to be crack cocaine, police said. Just before 10:15 a.m., he showed the money to a classmate, who alerted a teacher at Thomas Mifflin School, on Conrad Street near Midvale Avenue, said Fernando Gallard, a school district spokesman. The boy turned over the drugs to a classroom attendant, and school officials called police, who then found the money on the boy, police said.
NEWS
September 11, 2013 | By Megan Lydon, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Fifteen years ago, the sidewalks around Eastern State Penitentiary were uneven, with weeds growing between the cracks. The sliver of land between the concrete and the former prison's stone walls was in even worse shape. The soil "had pieces of rebar sticking out of the ground, lots of trash, and a lot of leaves. . . . It was just a mess," said Heidi Siegel, president of the Friends of Eastern State Penitentiary Park. What's more, parts of the land had been used as an informal dog run. At 11 a.m. Tuesday, thanks to hours of work by volunteers and money from the city, the Friends of Eastern State, and others, a patch of land along Corinthian Avenue from Brown Street to Fairmount Avenue will be dedicated as the city's latest community project: Corinthian Gardens, a collection of individual plots, grassy areas, picnic benches, and a stone path.
NEWS
August 28, 2013 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN BUS DRIVER Trulio Arias stopped at the National Constitution Center in Center City yesterday morning to drop off 36 Chinese tourists, he figured he'd have a quiet hour to himself before he retrieved them and headed to New York City, their next stop. Instead, Arias became the surprise star of a news conference held by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to announce a national blitz of bus inspections. As TV cameras recorded and the Chinese tourists waited nearby, city police inspected Arias' bus and ordered it out of service until a mechanic could arrive to replace a well-worn rear tire.
NEWS
August 25, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Innocent until proven guilty. Four words to live by. " So criminal defense barrister Martha Costello declares with conviction to a fresh-faced intern in a particularly cringeworthy scene in the first episode of Silk . There are other missteps, tired cliches, and moments of silliness to follow. Happily, Masterpiece Mystery's latest British import improves considerably over the course of its three weekly feature-length episodes. Created by former attorney Peter Moffat ( North Square , Criminal Justice )
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