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NEWS
February 6, 2008 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An admitted Southwest Philadelphia drug dealer told a federal jury yesterday that he routinely purchased three to five kilograms of cocaine a month from reputed drug kingpin Alton "Ace Capone" Coles from early in 2003 until summer 2005. Desmond Faison said three of those kilograms usually were converted into small doses of crack cocaine sold by a network of dealers working for him around the Paschall Homes in Southwest Philadelphia. The remainder, he said, was resold to dealers from other parts of the city or from New Jersey.
NEWS
August 4, 2007 | By SOLOMON JONES
I SAT CUFFED on the couch with tube socks over my hands as the shrinks fired questions at me. "Do you know why you're here, Mr. Jones?" said the one with the phony smile. I ignored him, just like I'd done the others. I wasn't going to spill my guts just because of one little meltdown on Market Street. "Mr. Jones, we're trying to help you," said a female doctor who seemed genuinely concerned. "Don't you want to be helped?" My tough exterior started to crack. I nodded slowly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Our Jan. 11 entry about a hairline crack in a countertop brought some expert advice and more questions, proving once more that one should never take anything for granite. The hairline crack under discussion was about 22 inches long, and was in front of the sink. The countertops are five years old, and the installer is out of business. Marty Jensen of Blue Bell spent 44 years in the granite business, and, though retired, troubleshoots for trade organizations. He said the crack may be the result of a natural fissure or could be a pressure crack caused by the method of installation.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro School Board will decide next week whether to hire a Cherry Hill architectural firm to investigate a 6-inch-wide crack that has been spreading along the foundation of the Hawthorne Park Elementary School. The district has been patching the crack in the school's concrete foundation for a number of years, Assistant School Superintendent Marcel Gilbert said Monday night during a board meeting. "We thought the crack was just from settling," he said. "But now we're concerned, because the school has been settling for 20 years.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Drug kingpin Derrick A. Grandison yesterday was jailed for 20 years without chance of parole for selling more than 30 pounds of crack and regular cocaine throughout the city. Grandison, 43, also was fined $100,000. He will be under court supervision for the rest of his life after his release from prison, said Assistant U.S. Attorney Odell Guyton. U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig, who handed down the jail term, called it a "very lenient sentence" and suggested it would have been more harsh had not the Jamaican-born Grandison pleaded guilty and become an informant against his suppliers and accomplices.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A reputed North Philadelphia drug boss allegedly used his teenage sons for several months in 1991 to deliver crack cocaine to a "select group" of customers who lived in Center City, a federal grand jury has charged. The grand jury said Antonio Santell's other customers had to go to the rear of his home on Orthodox Street near Tackawana, which was open for business around the clock. There, they could put money in a can and wait while the can was pulled to an upper floor, where the money was counted, before they their drugs were returned in the can. At times between January and May 1991 the drug network was grossing about $4,000 a day in crack sales, the grand jury charged.
NEWS
August 4, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecution wanted to put on a scale all the drug packets the cops scooped up while arresting Derrick Johnson last Dec. 13. If the weight was more than two grams, Johnson, 28, faced a mandatory year in prison. But the packets never got to the scale. Common Pleas Judge William J. Mazzola agreed with Johnson's lawyer that there was no sound evidence that the packets had belonged to Johnson. After all, it was dark, and there were plenty of other drug dealers around Myrtlewood and Jefferson streets, tossing bags when police showed up,argued George H. Newman.
NEWS
March 6, 2006
I THINK Signe Wilkinson's "World Parenting Styles" cartoon shows that the artist and the Daily News are extremely ignorant on the problems faced by our young people in the city. I am a principal of an alternative high school in North Philadelphia, and I see children and young adults facing the drug problem every day. Here we have a seven-year-old girl bringing 12 bags of crack to school, and it is turned into a joke. The children of our impoverished neighborhoods face real issues that they have no control of. They face murder and drug trafficking every day, and they have no choice but to live in this horrifying condition.
NEWS
August 4, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
HOW LOW can we go? I'm talking, of course, about today's waistbands. If you thought the belly-baring thing was bad enough, take a look at the sartorial depths to which fashion has now sunk. The L.A. Times has declared it "the summer of the pelvic bone. " Last year's already obscene low-riders have gone the way of high-water polyester pants. Today's hip-huggers have almost nothing but hope to hang onto anymore. The "normal" inseam-to-waist rise of 8 to 9 inches is shrinking faster than Britney Spears' record sales.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the cold logic of urban evolution, can gourmet restaurants and art galleries rout crack? That's the six-figure issue for residents of Spring Garden, a gentrifying neighborhood of stately trees and grand six-figure Victorian homes - but also a neighborhood with a flourishing crack trade on its streets. It was just four years ago that one of the leaders in the gentrification movement predicted that simple economics guaranteed change for the rectangular neighborhood northwest of Center City.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - On a hot beach day, Barbara Malik, 36, took a break with her three sons along the boardwalk for a late-afternoon snack. A few bites into their soft pretzels and fries, six seagulls swarmed in from the beach. The birds paused just inches above their heads. They squawked, and they tried - unsuccessfully - to snag a meal. "We're not even feeding them," said Malik, of Williamstown. "If you try to feed them, they probably hover over more - but they're still hovering over us even now. " It's a common scene up and down the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A flawed weld that attaches a plate to a key weight-bearing beam is at the root of SEPTA's rail-car woes, the company that built the cars acknowledged for the first time Tuesday. "The design of how it was welded and the weld itself are in question," Andrew Hyer, marketing and business-development manager at Hyundai Rotem, said Tuesday in the company's first extended comments since cracks in the beams forced SEPTA to pull one-third of its rail cars from service. "How we decide to weld the material may make all the difference," Hyer said.
NEWS
July 20, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
A police officer was injured after a man armed with a rock attacked another officer Monday afternoon in Chester County, police said. Officer Jared Davis was on patrol about 1:50 p.m. when Eric L. Watson, 29, allegedly stepped into the street in front of the Coatesville Area Public Library and threw a large rock at his patrol car, shattering part of the windshield As Davis attempted to exit his vehicle near the library at North Fifth Avenue...
NEWS
July 16, 2016
ISSUE | PHILA. TAXES Good to crack down on delinquents The Greater Philadelphia Association of Realtors applauds the efforts of Mayor Kenney and City Councilman Allan Domb to reinvigorate the collection process for delinquent property taxes ("Phila. may expand tax-liens program," July 8). Last year, the city collected more than $17 million after conducting two successful sales of property-tax liens. This illustrates that owed revenues can be collected when there is government will.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
In car after car, the trouble spot was the same: Hairline cracks along a joint where contractors had welded steel plates no bigger than an ice cream sandwich. On Thursday, SEPTA engineers offered the first public look at the cracks that sidelined 120 rail cars, upending the daily commute for thousands of passengers since early July. Still unclear is what caused the cracks, in most cases barely noticeable to the untrained eye, but officials said they hope to have an answer next week.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Erin Serpico, Staff Writer
Underage drinking, rowdy teens, and violations of bicycle and skateboard curfews - all taking place on Sea Isle City's beach and promenade this summer - have prompted police to increase patrols. Over the July Fourth weekend, the department began targeting enforcement against these and other quality-of-life issues with a zero-tolerance policy. Sea Isle City Police Capt. Thomas McQuillen said the department has received complaints from residents and tourists since the beginning of summer.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
SEPTA's Silverliner V cars were sidelined by a problem that has dogged mechanical engineers for as long as they have worked with metal: fatigue. That is the term for microscopic cracks that can develop with repeated back-and-forth loading, which happens as trains move from one section of track to the next. If allowed to spread, such cracks can eventually lead to failure, as when you bend a paper clip enough times that it breaks. Most of the SEPTA cars were pulled out of service before that happened, but in one car the crack had propagated through a 9-foot beam called an equalizer, agency engineers said Tuesday.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Structural failures found in a third of SEPTA's train fleet are forcing more than 100 cars off the tracks indefinitely. Fixes could take the rest of the summer, but riders who account for 150,000 trips on Regional Rail each day will likely face crowded trains and big delays. "Unfortunately, it will be rough on our railroad customers," said Jeff Knueppel, SEPTA's general manager. The flaw, a crack in a weight-bearing beam on a train car's undercarriage, has shown up in almost all of SEPTA's Silverliner V's, the newest trains in its Regional Rail fleet.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Citing the "disturbingly low performance" of many virtual charter schools across the country, two leading national charter organizations on Thursday called on state education officials to make tough policy changes to improve cyber education and close chronically troubled virtual schools. The unprecedented action by the charter school community has special relevance for Pennsylvania, one of the nation's "big three" in cyber enrollment. The state's 13 cyber charters enroll 35,250 students who receive instruction online in their homes.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
When the feds closed Brotherly Love Ambulance Inc. in October 2011 amid allegations of Medicare fraud, the owner's son quickly opened his own ambulance company and picked up where his mother had left off. For a while, anyway. Bassem Kuran, who also was a driver for Brotherly Love, is to be arraigned this month for making false statements in a healthcare matter, related to his operation of VIP Ambulance Inc. For years, teams of federal officials have been trying to stamp out this "whack-a-mole" pattern of one fraudulent ambulance operator shutting down only to have another - sometimes headed by a friend or family member - replace it. But since 2014, authorities have hit on an effective strategy.
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