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Crack

NEWS
July 27, 1988 | By VALERIA M. RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
At the Martin Luther King Plaza housing project, four towering tenements festering with drugs, the second-graders can tell you where the crack houses are. "I know where the Jamaicans at," said a 7-year-old girl who lives in the South Philadelphia project. She then ticked off three other places to buy crack in her building. The children know how the drug takes its toll. "You can tell when somebody's on the pipe," said an 11-year-old. "They look all dried up. Like a prune.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | By Paul Anderson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Five years after crack cocaine exploded on America's streets, one of its most serious aftershocks is due to hit America's classrooms. The first wave of children born to crack-addicted mothers will be entering school this fall, causing a panic among parents, educators, and federal and state officials who are trying to decide how to deal with their behavioral problems and learning disabilities. "We've got a national disaster on our hands here," William Schipper, executive director of the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, said at a House hearing last week.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Township police have charged two people with manufacturing crack cocaine after 375 vials of it were found in the suspects' apartment at the Creekside apartment complex. Gerald R. Scott, 24, and Radeen Fleming, 18, were arrested at home after the 7:30 a.m. search of their apartment Sunday. With the vials, police said they found empty bags that had contained new crack cocaine vials in the kitchen trash can. Police had gone to the apartment after receiving a tip that the two were manufacturing crack cocaine.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Crack cocaine rots this green farming region as surely as any weevil. Addiction, crime, syphilis and family strife have blossomed among poor farm and factory workers since the highly addictive drug came to quiet agricultural towns here four years ago, police say. And the decay is reaching deeper and becoming harder to root out as dealers sell more and purer crack than ever before, said Detective William West of the Delaware State Police....
NEWS
June 26, 1986 | By Arnold S. Trebach
Stories about the new drug "crack" have been appearing regularly. Authorities have said that crack is like cocaine only more addictive, that there is no such thing as occasional use by recreational users, that it is cheap and thus being sold primarily to our youth, that there is an epidemic of abuse and overdose deaths, that the violent crime rate is rising because of this epidemic and that the security of the nation is at risk from the drug masterminds...
NEWS
September 25, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Derrick Neal took a man's life because he needed a drug fix, said the prosecutor. Neal, 30, robbed Samuel Nelson, 26, of his drugs, then shot him to death at Chew Avenue and Washington Lane, Germantown, on May 28, Assistant District Attorney Hugh Colihan said yesterday. After the killing, Neal went to a nearby home to smoke the crack he had stolen, addded the DA. After a preliminary hearing, Municipal Judge William A. King Jr. ordered Neal, of McMahon Street near Walnut Lane in Germantown, to stand trial on murder and robbery charges.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By James R. Carroll, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A 15-inch crack was found in the fuselage of an American Airlines Boeing 727 that was forced to make an emergency landing in Detroit after suddenly losing cabin pressure, airline officials said yesterday. American Flight 984, with 105 passengers and seven crew members, was bound for Philadelphia from Chicago Monday when the incident occurred. Oxygen masks were deployed in the cabin, and there were no injuries. Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board investigators were called in to examine the aircraft, which was flown empty to American's maintenance center in Tulsa, Okla.
NEWS
March 5, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Nancy Berman was walking her dog along the streets of LaMott last month when she was dealt a heavy blow. But it wasn't a robber that delivered it. It was a small plastic crack vial. "I was walking along Cedar, and I looked down at the ground right behind my house, and there was a crack vial," said Berman. "I picked it up, got to the corner of Cedar and Graham, and there was another one. And I kept finding them until, when I got to the (LaMott) Community Center, I had seven or eight of them in a two-block area.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
His mom was a cop, his dad a social worker, but Gillyard McLeod went for the fast bucks and became a low-level drug dealer. For him, crime didn't pay. Caught red-handed last year selling crack cocaine in Southwest Philadelphia, McLeod, a 23-year-old with no prior criminal record, was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison without chance of parole. "Have mercy on me!" cried McLeod, a big man, about 6-foot-4 and 270 pounds. Mercy was out of the question. The 10-year term was "mandatory," required by law, U.S. District Judge Clarence C. Newcomer reminded the defendant, because he'd been caught with more than 50 grams of crack.
NEWS
March 19, 1988 | By JOANNE SILLS and JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writers
The Martin Luther King Plaza public-housing project rises a dozen littered, graffiti-scarred floors above 12th Street in South Philadelphia. Until recently, it was the home of two teen-age brothers who had become cocaine-dealers. Both were killed, execution-style, over drugs. A third youth, who lived two floors above them, narrowly escaped death yesterday, police said. A key to why the youths got involved in drug selling may lie in the wall writings, where the word "money" and dollar signs figured prominently.
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