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Craft Beer

NEWS
March 7, 2014
IT TURNS out, corn isn't so bad after all. After decades of pounding the cob, the solons who represent America's small brewers now say it's OK to lighten beer with corn, rice and other so-called adjunct ingredients. In other words, the days when craft beer distinguished itself as all-malt are all gone. The change came as the Boulder, Colo.-based Brewers Association this week announced several revisions in its "core values and beliefs," including its troublesome definition of "craft brewer.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
FOUR YEARS ago, when she launched the first Sour Fest, at South Philly's Devil's Den, owner Erin Wallace was happy to offer a modest list of about a dozen sour ales, including the highly regarded likes of Petrus Aged Pale Ale , Cantillon Kriek and Russian River Consecration . At the time, the existence of these quirky, tart varieties seemed nothing more than a blip in the growth of artisan brews. Most craft brewers were focused elsewhere - on hops or high alcohol. Sour beer, by contrast, didn't seem to have much of a future - not just because of its off-putting name and unconventional flavor, but because of its somewhat complex and time-consuming brewing methods.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matt Hall majored in business administration at Bloomsburg University, but even in college, he knew there was only one thing he wanted to do: brew beer. Traditionally, the world of craft brewing has been small and insular - like a hidden pub on a back alley. But in Philadelphia, where the roster of upscale gastropubs is ever growing and Philly Beer Week is fast becoming a civic holiday, opportunities to launch a successful full-time career in beer-making are expanding as quickly as the head of a carelessly poured pint.
NEWS
August 16, 2009 | By Rick Nichols INQUIRER FOOD COLUMNIST
You can count on a thunderstorm to pump up business at a brewpub. Especially at the shore. So it was no surprise in the founding manger of Dogfish Head Brewing here, beneath canoes suspended from the rafters, that regulars stayed put, ordering extra rounds, when the skies opened up last week. On this particular day, they included a vacationing industrial engineer from Boeing, a gray-haired fellow who'd biked up from Ocean City, Md., and a guy in a Beeriotic Table T-shirt, each one a Dogfish disciple - each one in a small way responsible for an extraordinary craft-beer success story being played out in the ugly teeth of the recession: Dogfish Head was doing a bulletproof business.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
YOU MIGHT remember the Daily News report a couple of months back about my diplomatic mission to Lithuania, where I spread the good word about American craft beer through the U.S. Embassy in Vilnius. Well, there's a second chapter in my efforts to spread peace through beer. I'm happy to report that Lithuania is coming to Philadelphia. Specifically, it's arriving in the form of next week's 37th annual Philadelphia Museum of Art Craft Show, the guest-artist program of which this year highlights 23 Lithuanian artists.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
BEER FREAKS these days remind me of Dug the Talking Dog in the animated movie, "Up," whose attention was so easily - squirrel! Only it's hops! Or barrel-aged! Or sour! American brewing is thriving precisely because of its brash creativity, so there's a lot to love in the hundreds of new, offbeat varieties that fill the shelves every week. Yet, sometimes, the Next Great Thing means we miss a perfectly good beer that's been staring us right in the face all along. I'm looking at you, Victory Helles Lager , my 2015 Beer of the Year.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2011 | By Drew Singer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphians are buying more craft beer than ever, but the region's brewmasters are bracing for the biggest name in beer to move into town. Anheuser-Busch InBev, maker of Budweiser products and the world's largest brewer, trademarked the name "215" this spring, along with the area codes for 14 other U.S. cities. The filing is the first public step toward creating a new beer by the same name. "We're being attacked," said Bill Covaleski, brewmaster and president of Victory Brewing Co., a craft brewery in Downingtown.
FOOD
March 5, 2009 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
As many as 30,000 beer lovers are expected to sip their way through the brewing bacchanalia that is Philly Beer Week beginning tomorrow, with more than 670 events across the region. There will be tastings of high-end craft beers, pairing dinners at gastropubs, even a 60-mile bike-and-drinking tour of local breweries during the 10-day celebration. More than 400 revelers made it to the Grey Lodge Pub's "Friday the Firkinteenth" in February. So how many will make the pilgrimage to Northeast Philly to quaff beer from firkins, the small kegs of artisan beer that drain by gravity, when Friday the 13th falls during the second annual Beer Week?
FOOD
March 11, 2010
Friday-Sunday, March 12-14 Philly Beer Weekend , a three day celebration of beer, featuring a wide array of events, including tastings, beer-themed dinners, rare beers, a "craft beer express," the sixth annual Brewers Plate at Penn Museum, and more. For more information, including a complete list of events with locations, times and pricing, visit www.phillybeerweek.org . Tickets for the Brewer's Plate fund-raising event are available at www.thebrewersplate.org . Monday, March 15 Spicing up your Passover , hands-on cooking class featuring tips on dishes that will take you beyond the same old Passover recipes and eight days of matzo.
NEWS
November 9, 2012
IN HONOR OF the centennial anniversary of its sinking on April 5, 1912, the Franklin Institute offers "Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition," Saturday through April 7, 2013. The show illustrates the ship's conception, aftermath and, of course, its ill-fated maiden voyage. What separates this from many other Titanic centenary activities is its focus on the personal stories associated with certain artifacts. Objects include a set of tiny perfume bottles - some still containing their original perfumes - a salesman was taking to the U.S., and the iconic cherub statue that graced the ship's Grand Staircase, an artifact never before seen in museums.
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