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Crash Tests

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BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | By Tom Krisher, Associated Press
DETROIT - Only two of 13 small SUVs performed well in front-end crash tests done by an insurance industry group, with several popular models faring poorly. Subaru's 2014 Forester was the only vehicle to get the top "good" rating in the results released Thursday. The 2013 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport was rated "acceptable. " But fast-selling models such as the Ford Escape, Honda CR-V, and Jeep Wrangler received only "marginal" or "poor" ratings from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new test that simulates a common and dangerous kind of front-end car crash shows major differences among high-end vehicles that would likely affect whether drivers walked away or suffered serious injuries in a kind of accident that kills thousands of U.S. motorists each year, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Among 11 models tested - all luxury or near-luxury 2012 midsize sedans - only three rated a score of "good" or "acceptable" in the new tests: an Acura TL, a Volvo S60, and an Infiniti G. Four vehicles - an Audi A4, a Mercedes C-Class, a Lexus ES 350 and a Lexus IS 250/350 - earned an overall score of "poor," as crash dummies recorded forces sufficient to cause severe lower-body injuries and testers found other risks of serious head or chest injuries, the IIHS said in a report due to be released Tuesday morning.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2001 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Honda Motor Co.'s Accord sedan fared best and the two-wheel-drive versions of General Motors Corp.'s Chevrolet Blazer and GMC Jimmy sport-utility vehicles scored worst in new government ratings of the resistance of cars and light trucks to rolling over. Yesterday the U.S. Department of Transportation issued its first ratings in an effort to reduce highway fatalities. The Accord was the only vehicle to receive the highest grade of five stars, while the Blazer and Jimmy were the only two receiving one star.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | Daily News and wire reports
AUTOMAKERS SUVs rated in crash tests Midsize sport utility vehicles from Mercedes-Benz and Lexus performed best in the latest sport utility vehicle crash tests by an insurance industry group. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave its "best pick" rating to the 1999 Mercedes-Benz M-class and Lexus RX300, based on its frontal offset crash test in which the vehicles were driven at 40 mph into a deformable barrier. The worst performer was the Mitsubishi Montero Sport, which was rated poor for a major collapse of the driver-passenger compartment.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
An "Inquiring Consumer" blog posting about crash tests of the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf was attributed in the print edition Friday to the wrong writer. The posting was by Jeff Gelles. A "PhillyDeals" blog posting published in the print edition Friday, and its headline, gave the wrong location for a Center City commercial property that signed as tenants the Children's Place and Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. The property is on Chestnut Street. A graphic published in some editions Friday based on initial county returns from Wednesday's election in New Jersey said voters rejected the Burlington Township School District's budget.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumer Reports magazine yesterday withdrew its Jan. 4 assertion that nine of 12 models of infant car seats "failed disastrously" when subjected to the kind of crash tests that federal officials use to rate vehicles' safety for adults. The move came after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration questioned the magazine's methodology in one of two key tests. The agency said the magazine's side-impact test subjected the seats to the equivalent of a broadside crash by a vehicle traveling at more than 70 m.p.h.
NEWS
May 6, 2000 | By Janet L. Fix, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
A new family of crash dummies will soon take some big hits to prove the safety of new air bags that the government said yesterday must be installed in U.S. cars and trucks starting in 2003. The job of the crash dummies - designed to replicate a short woman, an average-sized man, a toddler and a child - is to reduce the number of people killed by air bags. So far, 92 children and 66 adults have been killed in low-speed and otherwise survivable crashes by the very air bags mandated by Washington to save their lives.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The Car Book is a popular auto-buying guide authored by consumer activist Jack Gillis, a benign, bespectacled fellow who evokes the mild-mannered Clark Kent. For most of the decade that he's been putting together his informative guide, its "good choices" listings have been heavy on Japanese product. That's not true in the just-published 1990 edition. Most of the "good choices" it recommends are domestic brands. The good choices are selected on the basis of federal crash tests, fuel economy, repair and maintenance expense, warranties, insurance costs and number of owner complaints.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | Daily News wire services
PANMUNJOM, KOREA U.S. REMAINS ARE RETURNED Communist North Korea today returned what it said were the remains of 33 Americans killed during the 1950-53 Korean War. U.S. Colonel Forrest Chilton, secretary of the Military Armistice Commission of the United Nations Command stationed in South Korea, accepted the remains at a rainswept ceremony on the Cold War frontier at Panmunjom, a hamlet that straddles the Korean divide. North Korean officers opened each coffin to show Chilton the skeletons of the servicemen and other remains, including dog tags, spoons and gloves.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
So the government is going to mandate more stringent fuel-efficiency standards for passenger cars, perhaps as high as 56 m.p.g., come 2025, and automakers are worried about what it means for them. My initial response? Tough luck for the automakers. Every time there's a new government mandate, it seems automakers decry how impossible it would be to meet the standard and push for ways to reduce or lower it. Seat belts. Catalytic converters. Air bags. Crash tests. They all met resistance from the folks who make the vehicles we drive.
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NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
KEMBA HEPPARD was back in his old West Philadelphia neighborhood near 50th and Reno when a young man approached. Heppard, 32, recognized him as one of the kids from the block, back when Heppard, his mother and two siblings shared a row home near the guy's grandmother, the same block where Heppard was shot nine times as a teenager. The guy was one of many boys in his neighborhood who got caught up with the older drug dealers. Now here he was, still on the lookout. Except today he was on the lookout for something else, too. He'd heard Heppard was doing well.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | By Tom Krisher, Associated Press
DETROIT - Only two of 13 small SUVs performed well in front-end crash tests done by an insurance industry group, with several popular models faring poorly. Subaru's 2014 Forester was the only vehicle to get the top "good" rating in the results released Thursday. The 2013 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport was rated "acceptable. " But fast-selling models such as the Ford Escape, Honda CR-V, and Jeep Wrangler received only "marginal" or "poor" ratings from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The driver charged in the Nov. 13 crash on Bustleton Avenue that killed two men tested positive for numerous drugs -- including heroin, morphine and cocaine -- when his blood was drawn two hours after the crash, a Philadelphia prosecutor said this morning. Robert Brenzenger, 33, also tested positive for marijuana, and the prescription drugs alprazolam, and zolpidem, Assistant District Attorney John Doyle said this morning during a preliminary hearing in Philadelphia Municipal Court, where Judge Patrick Dugan ordered that Brenzenger continue to be held pending trial.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
The driver charged in the Nov. 13 crash on Bustleton Avenue that killed two men tested positive for numerous drugs, including heroin, morphine, and cocaine, when his blood was drawn two hours after the crash, a Philadelphia prosecutor said Wednesday. Robert Brenzenger, 33, also tested positive for marijuana and the prescription drugs alprazolam and zolpidem, Assistant District Attorney John Doyle said during a preliminary hearing in Municipal Court. Judge Patrick Dugan ordered Brenzenger to remain in custody pending trial.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new test that simulates a common and dangerous kind of front-end car crash shows major differences among high-end vehicles that would likely affect whether drivers walked away or suffered serious injuries in a kind of accident that kills thousands of U.S. motorists each year, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Among 11 models tested - all luxury or near-luxury 2012 midsize sedans - only three rated a score of "good" or "acceptable" in the new tests: an Acura TL, a Volvo S60, and an Infiniti G. Four vehicles - an Audi A4, a Mercedes C-Class, a Lexus ES 350 and a Lexus IS 250/350 - earned an overall score of "poor," as crash dummies recorded forces sufficient to cause severe lower-body injuries and testers found other risks of serious head or chest injuries, the IIHS said in a report due to be released Tuesday morning.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2011 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
So the government is going to mandate more stringent fuel-efficiency standards for passenger cars, perhaps as high as 56 m.p.g., come 2025, and automakers are worried about what it means for them. My initial response? Tough luck for the automakers. Every time there's a new government mandate, it seems automakers decry how impossible it would be to meet the standard and push for ways to reduce or lower it. Seat belts. Catalytic converters. Air bags. Crash tests. They all met resistance from the folks who make the vehicles we drive.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
An "Inquiring Consumer" blog posting about crash tests of the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf was attributed in the print edition Friday to the wrong writer. The posting was by Jeff Gelles. A "PhillyDeals" blog posting published in the print edition Friday, and its headline, gave the wrong location for a Center City commercial property that signed as tenants the Children's Place and Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. The property is on Chestnut Street. A graphic published in some editions Friday based on initial county returns from Wednesday's election in New Jersey said voters rejected the Burlington Township School District's budget.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
No single factor determines how well a car will protect its occupants if the worst happens. Smart engineering and design can make a smaller car safer. Bad design can eliminate the inherent advantage enjoyed by occupants of larger vehicles. But you can't repeal the laws of physics. And that could be one reason why two all-electric vehicles, the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf, performed especially well in crash tests made public by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The nonprofit insurance-industry group suggests that the vehicles are helped by an unexpected factor: the extra mass of the cars' heavy battery packs.
NEWS
January 22, 2008 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While seat belts save lives, the straps can unintentionally maim and even kill young children in crashes. In researching the problem, bioengineer Kristy Arbogast talked to automakers about devising restraints that would be safer for small, immature bodies. "The response I'd get back was, 'We don't have the tools we need to design better child seat belts,' " said Arbogast, a traffic-injury researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. What they needed was a smarter dummy for crash tests.
NEWS
January 19, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Consumer Reports magazine yesterday withdrew its Jan. 4 assertion that nine of 12 models of infant car seats "failed disastrously" when subjected to the kind of crash tests that federal officials use to rate vehicles' safety for adults. The move came after the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration questioned the magazine's methodology in one of two key tests. The agency said the magazine's side-impact test subjected the seats to the equivalent of a broadside crash by a vehicle traveling at more than 70 m.p.h.
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