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Crazy Eddie

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BUSINESS
February 14, 1990 | The Inquirer Staff
Eddie Antar, the Crazy Eddie Inc. founder sought by authorities since last week for questioning in an insider-trading case, surrendered yesterday to face contempt charges for not answering demands that he return $52 million to the United States. U.S. Marshal Arthur Borinsky in Newark, N.J., said Antar was released pending a court hearing Feb. 27. Antar and other executives of the Crazy Eddie discount electronics chain were accused of inside trading by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crazy Eddie, hobbled by severe financial problems, yesterday announced that the company was calling it quits and closing all remaining stores. The consumer-electronics chain has been struggling to stay afloat for more than a year and a half. Although it filed for bankruptcy in June, Crazy Eddie had hoped it could reorganize its debts and continue in business. But the company yesterday said that it had "determined that a reorganization was not feasible . . . due to a number of factors, most significantly the inability" to obtain credit to buy merchandise.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
The Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating a bid by the founder of Crazy Eddie to take the electronics company private, according to papers the company filed with the agency. The 39-store chain, which is based in Edison, N.J., and has outlets in Cherry Hill and Philadelphia, also disclosed that Chemical Bank has suspended payments on a $52 million line of credit. The SEC inquiry centers on founder Eddie Antar's May 20 offer, along with that of First City Financial Corp.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer (Daily News wire services contributed to this report.)
Entertainment Marketing, a Houston electronics wholesaler and distributor, has entered the bidding fray for Crazy Eddie, the New York electronics retailer. The Entertainment Marketing bid of $8 a share cash, weighs in at $1 a share more than a mid-May offer by Crazy Eddie founder and chairman Eddie Antar, along with the Belzberg family of Canada, to buy back the firm he launched and then left. Entertainment Marketing - which sells electronics on cable television and to retailers primarily in the Southwest - made its "negotiable" bid to take Crazy Eddie private to the Crazy Eddie board yesterday.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Crazy Eddie, beleaguered by a Securities and Exchange Commission inquiry and a takeover battle, nonetheless is continuing its expansion plans and will open two more stores here, according to a source within the company. Crazy Eddie already operates stores in the Northeast and in Cherry Hill. The new ones will be in the One and Olney Shopping Center at Front Street and Olney Avenue and in Willow Grove. The consumer electronics firm has been the subject of rumors and intrigue in recent weeks in the face of competing bids for control by the company's founder, Eddie Antar, and a Houston businessman.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1989 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crazy Eddie Inc., the consumer-electronics chain struggling to emerge from bankruptcy, yesterday said that it planned to close eight of its 26 remaining stores, including two in the Philadelphia area. The stores in Willow Grove and in Northeast Philadelphia are among those to be closed. Crazy Eddie, known for its screeching television advertisements and cut- rate prices, filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy June 20. It had initially hoped to reorganize its debts without closing any stores.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1987 | By Barbara Demick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every New Yorker knows Crazy Eddie. He's the loud-mouthed, bug-eyed guy who rouses you out of the stupor of late-night television with screechy pitches to check out the stereo and consumer-electronics prices that are "ins-a-a-ane. " During the company's heyday in the early 1980s, recalls New York securities analyst Donald I. Trott of Mabon, Nugent & Co., "it was not uncommon for people to get on the subway and ride two miles to go to Crazy Eddie. They'd say, 'We've got to check this out.' " The public bought it. Wall Street bought it. Crazy Eddie went public in 1984, one of the hottest new issues of the year.
NEWS
November 1, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crazy Eddie and his insane prices that the store says can't be beat have finally arrived in eastern Montgomery County. Crazy Eddie, the discount electronics chain based in Edison, N.J., opened with much fanfare at the Willow Grove Shopping Center on Tuesday morning. To lure customers, Crazy Eddie offered free T-shirts and caps as well as its traditional discount prices. "We were very pleased with the turnout on the first day," said Steve Berger, a regional manager. "We have thousands and thousands of people.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer correspondent M.K. Guzda contributed to this article
Long before the Securities and Exchange Commission started snooping around, and before the U.S. Attorney's Office and FBI launched their investigations, and before the class-action suits and the bankruptcy proceedings and the criminal charges of massive fraud and stock manipulation, Lillian Rosen knew that her former son-in-law, Eddie Antar, was trouble. "He was never at home at night," Rosen said in a deposition from a 1988 matrimonial suit filed by her daughter, Deborah Rosen Antar.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | Erin E. Arvedlund
Remember Crazy Eddie, the electronics-store king who concocted one of the biggest public company frauds of the 1980s? Eddie Antar ended up in prison, but his cousin and onetime chief financial officer, Sam E. Antar, today advises federal and state law enforcement agencies about white-collar crime and trains them to identify and catch crooks. Often, the former CPA refers cases as an independent whistle-blower and teaches about white-collar crime for professional organizations, businesses, and colleges.
NEWS
January 10, 2011
IN ONE week, the Era of Ed - or, as they call it west of the Susquehanna, the Error of Ed - is over. Our soon-to-be-ex-Guv's future includes a book, speeches for pay, a TV presence beyond Eagles postgame, service on some boards of directors, rainmaking for some lucky law firm and continued teaching at Penn. It does not, he swears, include running for any other office, ever. "I'm done," he said at a recent Capitol sit-down with journalists. What follows are final thoughts on a public career notable for its longevity (eight years D.A., eight years mayor, two years Democratic National Committee chairman, eight years governor)
SPORTS
April 9, 2003 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
No one knows exactly why the Flyers were playing drums and other assorted instruments last week in Florida during their two-day bonding session. "I've heard about guys going into the mountains and having to rely on each other for survival, but giving a guy bongo drums is dangerous," Toronto Maple Leafs coach Pat Quinn said. Bongos likely won't win the Eastern Conference quarterfinal series between the Flyers and the Maple Leafs, which begins tonight. Goaltending, however, might.
SPORTS
January 8, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
By leading the Dallas Stars to the last two Stanley Cup finals, Ed Belfour went a long way toward erasing his reputation as "Crazy Eddie," the goaltender who could be wacky or wonderful. Now, a second case of bizarre off-ice behavior in less than a year is threatening to revive that nickname. Belfour left the team in Boston on Saturday, flying back to Dallas after arguing with coach Ken Hitchcock over participation in a pregame practice. Yesterday, the Stars suspended Belfour indefinitely.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | By Chris Conway, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
Eddie Antar, co-founder of the failed Crazy Eddie discount electronics chain, admitted in federal court in Newark yesterday that he led a stock manipulation scheme that enabled him to reap $74 million from the sale of fraudulently inflated stocks. Antar, who fled the United States in 1990 and eluded capture for two years while living on millions stashed overseas, agreed to plead guilty to one count of racketeering conspiracy in what authorities have called one of the nation's largest stock-manipulation cases.
NEWS
February 23, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The African-American Air Force recruiter pointed to the man she knew as "Crazy Eddie," and said he was the white man who had made racial threats to her on the telephone for more than a year. Sgt. Paula Powers, 31, said Edward McMahon, 35, formerly of Roxborough, stalked her at a Cottman Avenue recruiting center, and repeatedly called her at work, saying that "n------" should be killed. "Go back to Africa," McMahon told Powers, she said. McMahon sat smiling at the defense table during his preliminary hearing before Municipal Judge Georganne V. Daher yesterday.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seven months ago, the Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ordered new trials for electronics mogul and alleged stock swindler Eddie "Crazy Eddie" Antar and his brother, Mitchell, saying U.S. District Judge Nicholas H. Politan had prejudged them. Yesterday, the appeals court dropped the other shoe, removing Politan from a related civil suit filed against the Antars' father, Sam, and other family members by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, stating that Politan "displayed a deep-seated antagonism that would make fair judgment impossible.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | by Marisol Bello and Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
Charles "Crazy Eddie" Reddish, Jr. was always known to be a little odd, his Burlington Township, N.J. neighbors said. Reddish was a familiar sight on Crestwood Drive, riding his bicycle everywhere, much the way children do in the suburbs, they said. Yesterday, Reddish hacked his girlfriend to death with a hatchet and then sexually assaulted her teen-age daughter before calmly surrendering to police, authorities said. Reddish, 34, allegedly beat his girlfriend, Rebbeca Wertz, with his bare hands after a domestic dispute early yesterday in their family room, said Burlington County Prosecutor Stephen G. Raymond.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edwin Segal, 81, the dapper, gregarious Camden County lawyer who made a world of friends during his 54 years in law, died Thursday of multiple strokes at his home in Marlton. "Everybody knew him and he knew everybody else," said Jay Strassberg, executive director of the Camden County Bar Association. " . . . He had a joie de vivre, he enjoyed life and he made that abundantly clear. " His ability to remember the names and the doings of his friends, co-workers and all their relatives amazed even his family.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
"Crazy Eddie" Antar, the jailed electronics tycoon, yesterday won himself and his brother a new trial for an alleged $121 million stock swindle. In overturning the convictions of Eddie and Mitchell Antar, a unanimous three-judge federal appeals court in Philadelphia said the judge who presided over their trial in 1993 gave the appearance that he was biased against them. The U.S. 3d Circuit Court of Appeals panel noted that U.S. District Judge Nicholas Politan, at a sentencing hearing last year, made a statement the tribunal found to be especially offensive.
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