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Crazy People

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NEWS
April 6, 1990 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer The Knight-Ridder wire service contributed to this article
About two dozen mental health activists picketed an advance showing of the movie Crazy People last night, much to the indifference or consternation of most people entering the theater on Rittenhouse Square. The activists were protesting the advertising campaign mounted by Paramount Pictures, which they say stigmatizes the mentally ill and wrongly portrays them as dangerous. Ads for the movie, stripped across billboards and bus shelters, read: "Warning: Crazy People are Coming. " The protesters outside the Eric Rittenhouse 3 theater included members of Project SHARE, a self-help organization for people with mental illness, representatives from agencies and advocacy organizations, and - for a few minutes - a member of City Council.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You don't need to be an analyst to offer a diagnosis of Crazy People, a comedy about psychiatric patients rehabilitated in a sheltered workshop where they write ad campaigns for clients like Sony. The movie suffers from split personality. As a satire of Madison Avenue, this film, written by Good Morning, Vietnam scenarist Mitch Markowitz, is subversively funny. As a feel-good movie on the order of The Dream Team - where the message is that normal people are certifiable and the institutionalized are really sane - Crazy People is as unfunny as movies get. Emory Leeson (Dudley Moore)
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | By Carolyn Acker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The ads for the movie are bad enough, they said. Big yellow signs on billboards and bus shelters that read, Warning: Crazy People Are Coming. Then, the weekly City Paper ran a promotion in Thursday's edition, offering free tickets to a screening of the movie. In order to win, readers were asked to come to the newspaper office yesterday and "prove to us you're crazy. " "I brought my medication and said, 'I'm crazy,' " recounted Laura Van Tosh, angrily shaking a bottle of pills drawn from her purse.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1990 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
If the mental health advocacy groups currently protesting the ad campaign for "Crazy People" are mad now, wait 'til they see the movie. While the advertisements may border on insensitivity, the picture itself ventures so far into vulgar territory that it surely crosses the very heartland of bad taste. There's just no way to defend a movie which suggests that the symptoms of mental illness include flagrant nose-picking, the swatting of imaginary flies and games of mime volleyball.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Bedlam Revisited begins, the reaction it elicits is: "Oh no, not another comedy routine about psychiatrists!" When it is over, the reaction is: "Oh no, another not-very-funny comedy routine about psychiatrists. " To those who have seen other shows by Ron Litman at Theater Center Philadelphia - this is his fourth appearance there in one-man shows of his own creation - a third reaction might be: Why is Litman taking on the weary theme of psychiatry when he is so good at humorously devastating political and social targets?
NEWS
August 1, 2011
LET'S SAY YOU HAVE an officemate. And one day you walk into your office to find your roomie rearranging everything. "Hey!" you say, "I work here, too!" "Don't worry," your officemate replies. "I'm going to ask for your input. Just as soon as I finish changing everything. " Would you consider that real input? Neither should Philadelphians. But holding public hearings after a decision has effectively been made appears to be the plan for the city's redistricting process. Redistricting, the process of redrawing Council districts, happens once every 10 years, and according to the city charter, should be done by September.
NEWS
September 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THIS YEAR'S Puerto Rican Day Parade will include a series of family-friendly activities intended to avert the disorder that has followed the parade in recent years. Mayor Nutter and other officials announced yesterday that the city will invest significant money in post-parade events, which include a concert at the Dell Music Center in Fairmount Park. Nutter said he did not yet know how much the city would investing. Community groups will contribute $50,000. The changes were spurred by last year's controversy after Lt. Jonathan Josey was filmed striking parade-goer Aida Guzman.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An 11th-grade boy expelled from Friends' Central School in Wynnewood in December for writing over the Internet that "stupid people should be banished or killed or enslaved" will start classes tomorrow at Upper Darby High School. The boy's attorney, Philip Stinson, said he would pursue a federal lawsuit against Friends' Central to have the student reinstated there, but would drop Upper Darby School District as a defendant in the suit because, he said, the district would admit the student.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Clark DeLeon
On May 13, 1985, I watched my city murder five children. They burned alive in front of my eyes as all of Philadelphia witnessed it on live television. Their ashes fell on my head as a biblical tower of flame rotated slowly from right to left, filling the sky above where I stood in horror among a bewildered crowd at 62d and Walnut. I shouted to a man on my right, "How can they do this?" He answered quietly, "That's my house. " He was a Philadelphia police officer who lived on the 6200 block of Osage Avenue.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | BY MIKE ROYKO
"Tell me the truth," Slats Grobnik said. "Am I a real stupid person?" Of course not. I mean, not all the time. We all have our moments. "Then how come I can't cook a frozen pizza?" Sure you can. Just follow the directions on the package. "How can I follow the directions when I can't turn on the oven?" You can't turn on an oven? "That's what I mean about me being stupid. " Nonsense. Anybody can turn on an oven. You just turn the knob. "You haven't seen our new oven.
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NEWS
September 19, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
THIS YEAR'S Puerto Rican Day Parade will include a series of family-friendly activities intended to avert the disorder that has followed the parade in recent years. Mayor Nutter and other officials announced yesterday that the city will invest significant money in post-parade events, which include a concert at the Dell Music Center in Fairmount Park. Nutter said he did not yet know how much the city would investing. Community groups will contribute $50,000. The changes were spurred by last year's controversy after Lt. Jonathan Josey was filmed striking parade-goer Aida Guzman.
NEWS
July 22, 2012 | E.J. Dionne
For all the dysfunction in our politics, a healthy pattern usually takes hold when a terrible tragedy seizes the nation's attention. We engage in a searching conversation about what rational steps can be taken by individuals, communities, and government to make a comparable tragedy less likely. Sometimes we act, and sometimes we don't, but at least we explore sensible solutions.   Unless the tragedy involves guns. Then our public reasoning goes haywire. Anyone who dares say an event such as the massacre at a Colorado movie theater early Friday requires us to rethink our firearms laws is accused of "exploiting" the deaths of innocent people.
NEWS
August 1, 2011
LET'S SAY YOU HAVE an officemate. And one day you walk into your office to find your roomie rearranging everything. "Hey!" you say, "I work here, too!" "Don't worry," your officemate replies. "I'm going to ask for your input. Just as soon as I finish changing everything. " Would you consider that real input? Neither should Philadelphians. But holding public hearings after a decision has effectively been made appears to be the plan for the city's redistricting process. Redistricting, the process of redrawing Council districts, happens once every 10 years, and according to the city charter, should be done by September.
NEWS
August 3, 2010
Late on a Saturday night two weeks ago, an unemployed carpenter packed his mother's Toyota Tundra with guns and set off for San Francisco, the authorities say, with a plan to kill progressives. When California Highway Patrol officers stopped him on an Oakland freeway for driving erratically, Byron Williams, wearing body armor, fired at police with a 9mm handgun, a shotgun, and a .308-caliber rifle with armor-penetrating bullets. Shot and captured after injuring two officers, Williams, on parole for bank robbery, told investigators that he wanted "to start a revolution" by "killing people of importance at the Tides Foundation and the ACLU," according to a police affidavit.
NEWS
May 13, 2010
Airport needs more frequent trains Re: "Airport needs face-lift," Tuesday: The expansion plan by the Federal Aviation Administration and Philadelphia International Airport is a good one. But rather then expand the number of economy parking spaces, I think it would be "greener" to focus on improving the frequency of SEPTA's R1 rail line. Today, the R1 is a tremendous resource that operates 18 hours a day every half-hour, every day. When you compare frequency of service at many other airports here in the United States and abroad, you will find that we don't match up. The standard worldwide is to run a train every 15 minutes or less.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Clark DeLeon
On May 13, 1985, I watched my city murder five children. They burned alive in front of my eyes as all of Philadelphia witnessed it on live television. Their ashes fell on my head as a biblical tower of flame rotated slowly from right to left, filling the sky above where I stood in horror among a bewildered crowd at 62d and Walnut. I shouted to a man on my right, "How can they do this?" He answered quietly, "That's my house. " He was a Philadelphia police officer who lived on the 6200 block of Osage Avenue.
NEWS
May 13, 2010 | By Clark DeLeon
On May 13, 1985, I watched my city murder five children. They burned alive in front of my eyes as all of Philadelphia witnessed it on live television. Their ashes fell on my head as a biblical tower of flame rotated slowly from right to left, filling the sky above where I stood in horror among a bewildered crowd at 62d and Walnut. I shouted to a man on my right, "How can they do this?" He answered quietly, "That's my house. " He was a Philadelphia police officer who lived on the 6200 block of Osage Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Now, kids, your mom and dad will be happy to let you watch NBC's The '70s tonight and tomorrow at 9, but we need to have a little talk. First, remember what we've always told you: Just because you see it on television, that doesn't mean it's real. You know that already, of course, from watching all those tattooed, half-naked, strange-behaving actors on MTV, pretending to be real teenagers. Well, a lot of things in The '70s are like that. First, about those clothes. The only people who dressed like that lived in Hollywood and New York City.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An 11th-grade boy expelled from Friends' Central School in Wynnewood in December for writing over the Internet that "stupid people should be banished or killed or enslaved" will start classes tomorrow at Upper Darby High School. The boy's attorney, Philip Stinson, said he would pursue a federal lawsuit against Friends' Central to have the student reinstated there, but would drop Upper Darby School District as a defendant in the suit because, he said, the district would admit the student.
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