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Crazy Quilt

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NEWS
December 3, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think back to college. Think back to weekends. Think back to the parties: raucous music, a few drinks, a dance or two, a few more drinks . . . your dancing partner is looking good. Maybe it takes one more drink to cinch it, but soon the two of you are sneaking back to your room, closing the door behind you and slipping into that hard, narrow dorm bed together. And sleeping. Really sleeping. That's not how you recall it? Sorry, flower child, but you've gone to seed.
NEWS
March 24, 2001
Ordinary measures could not rescue the Chester-Upland School District in Delaware County from the chaos spawned by decades of poverty, patronage, neglect and civic breakdown. So Pennsylvania is trying experimental therapy. This week, it made Chester-Upland - already the first system to be taken over by Harrisburg - the first in the state to be turned completely over to private management. What's more, it has divided the district's 10 schools among three for-profit firms that received five-year contracts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1993 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Walk into the Noyes Museum this weekend in Oceanville, Atlantic County, and you'll be greeted by an enormous white-metal chicken that used to sit on the roof of a poultry-and-produce market just outside nearby Egg Harbor City. Farther down the terraced central gallery you'll find the mother of all birdhouses - a six-foot barrel-shaped colossus built by a craftsman in Whiting, N.J., to accommodate 112 nesting pairs of purple martins. Near it sits a 7 1/2-foot wooden fish made around 1930 as a shop sign.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By ELMER SMITH
Editor's Note: Elmer Smith is counting down the seven reasons that school reform isn't working in Philadelphia. Here's reason No. 4 as we count down to reason No. 1: THIS SO-CALLED reform is the malnourished offspring of a shotgun wedding between the mayor and the governor. Each of them went into it for the wrong reasons. So, it's no surprise that this union has produced a mongrel even a mother couldn't love. John Street went after a deal with the governor for one reason only: The schools were desperate for money.
NEWS
August 1, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The notion of merging Merchantville and Cherry Hill doesn't seem so far-fetched to Nancy Cosme. She can look out her window and see what such a municipal marriage would look like. "In my house, I belong to Cherry Hill," says Cosme, a 46-year-old elementary schoolteacher who lives on the township's far, far, far west side. "But my garage is in Merchantville. " In Cosme's neighborhood - the eastern side of which is sometimes called Barlow - a township and a borough that seem quite different from a distance blend rather seamlessly into a single community.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | By Ralph and Terry Kovel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Battery-operated toys made after World War II were fun to play with when they were new. Now they attract collectors. The animated toys show figures smoking, drinking, dialing phones, rocking babies, walking, playing music and even undressing. The toys can be found at rummage and garage sales, but there are a few rules for the wise buyer: The condition of the toy is important. The original box adds to the value. Always take batteries with you to test the toy before buying. Age and rarity are now always what determine value.
LIVING
March 3, 2000 | By Michael Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
Where have all the antique patchwork quilts gone? Back to where they were 30 years ago, stuffed into cedar chests, steamer trunks and linen closets, as unappreciated and unseen now as they had been before the 1976 bicentennial brought them out of hiding and made them must-have collectibles. Motivated by patriotic nostalgia, acquisitiveness and dirt-cheap prices, antiques dealers snarfed up these all-American textiles by the armload back then. The best went to museums or serious collectors.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Quilts are here to stay - not only on our beds, but also in our museums, art galleries and books. Commemorative quilts are now being celebrated in an enormously appealing and impressive exhibit, "Made to Remember: American Commemorative Quilts," at Brandywine River Museum. Organized by Cornell University's Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, the show seems destined for this season's art exhibit hit parade locally. Why? Because it pushes all the right buttons - American history, the Civil War, the frontier, art, memory, family traditions, women's work.
NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
The girls are back in town, and the big premium-cable networks are happy to have them. True Blood , whose mind-reading Sookie Stackhouse finds herself forever in the midst of a crazy quilt of supernatural shenanigans, returns Sunday at 9 p.m. on HBO. On Monday, Showtime spins an hour of comedy, some moments funnier than others, with single-mom-turned-felon Nancy Botwin in Weeds and cancer patient Cathy Jamison in The Big C ...
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barry Esterman has worked his way up from pizza deliveryman to produce vendor in the Bell's Corner neighborhood where he grew up. He peddles his wares from a red truck on Bergen Street, just outside the Bell's Corner Shopping Center. His customers, many of them elderly, say they like saving pennies on salad stuff by buying from this skinny, long-haired 24- year-old. They still rely on Holiday Market, anchor of the shopping center, for other groceries. They like its voluntary unit pricing, double coupons, 99-cent grocery delivery - features proclaimed by huge window signs.
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NEWS
June 26, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
The girls are back in town, and the big premium-cable networks are happy to have them. True Blood , whose mind-reading Sookie Stackhouse finds herself forever in the midst of a crazy quilt of supernatural shenanigans, returns Sunday at 9 p.m. on HBO. On Monday, Showtime spins an hour of comedy, some moments funnier than others, with single-mom-turned-felon Nancy Botwin in Weeds and cancer patient Cathy Jamison in The Big C ...
NEWS
August 1, 2010 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
The notion of merging Merchantville and Cherry Hill doesn't seem so far-fetched to Nancy Cosme. She can look out her window and see what such a municipal marriage would look like. "In my house, I belong to Cherry Hill," says Cosme, a 46-year-old elementary schoolteacher who lives on the township's far, far, far west side. "But my garage is in Merchantville. " In Cosme's neighborhood - the eastern side of which is sometimes called Barlow - a township and a borough that seem quite different from a distance blend rather seamlessly into a single community.
NEWS
November 28, 2006 | By Bill Bonvie
If you're like most people in these parts, you probably didn't give a hoot about who won the World Series. You probably don't care, too, that St. Louis also beat out baseball rival Detroit for the honor of being named the least safe city in the nation in two independent surveys. If you're like most people, your interest in sports and safety rankings probably doesn't range too far from home. So it may interest you that Camden has slipped from being the least safe city to the fourth or fifth least safe - depending on which survey you put credence in, the one by Morgan Quitno Press or the one by The Inquirer.
SPORTS
February 17, 2006 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The soul of Turin rests in its heart. Tiny schoolyards filled with colorfully attired children. Busy piazzas encased by architecturally rich structures. Hidden university courtyards. Tony shops alongside quirky stalls. Medieval churches and hundreds - literally hundreds - of fragrant cafes, bakeries and florists. The piazza-pocked city center is the salvation of this industrial town, which, with its looming factories and its parade of indistinct high-rises, resembles something from Eastern Europe's Iron Curtain heyday.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | By ELMER SMITH
Editor's Note: Elmer Smith is counting down the seven reasons that school reform isn't working in Philadelphia. Here's reason No. 4 as we count down to reason No. 1: THIS SO-CALLED reform is the malnourished offspring of a shotgun wedding between the mayor and the governor. Each of them went into it for the wrong reasons. So, it's no surprise that this union has produced a mongrel even a mother couldn't love. John Street went after a deal with the governor for one reason only: The schools were desperate for money.
NEWS
March 24, 2001
Ordinary measures could not rescue the Chester-Upland School District in Delaware County from the chaos spawned by decades of poverty, patronage, neglect and civic breakdown. So Pennsylvania is trying experimental therapy. This week, it made Chester-Upland - already the first system to be taken over by Harrisburg - the first in the state to be turned completely over to private management. What's more, it has divided the district's 10 schools among three for-profit firms that received five-year contracts.
NEWS
March 19, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In observance of Women's History Month, the Gloucester County Historical Society will feature a free exhibition of crazy quilts. About 15 - most of them sewn between roughly 1875 and 1915 - will be on display from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday during the society's monthly open house at 58 N. Broad St in Woodbury. Additional quilts will be displayed at the same time at the Woodbury Friends Meetinghouse, 124 N. Broad St. Crazy quilts, said Leslie Watson, the historical society's museum director, are so named because the scraps of material are arranged in no particular pattern.
LIVING
March 3, 2000 | By Michael Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
Where have all the antique patchwork quilts gone? Back to where they were 30 years ago, stuffed into cedar chests, steamer trunks and linen closets, as unappreciated and unseen now as they had been before the 1976 bicentennial brought them out of hiding and made them must-have collectibles. Motivated by patriotic nostalgia, acquisitiveness and dirt-cheap prices, antiques dealers snarfed up these all-American textiles by the armload back then. The best went to museums or serious collectors.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Ginny Hast can't keep her hands off it. The Ivyland grandmother takes her quilting, in a plastic bag tucked into her handbag, everywhere she goes. It's particularly helpful in a crisis, she said, explaining the time 10 years ago when she and her husband got stuck in an elevator on the ninth floor of a Rochester, N.Y., hotel. Hast calmly quilted until a squadron of ax-wielding firefighters came to the rescue an hour later. "At least I got a lot of sewing done," said Hast, 69. "And the manager offered us a free night.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Think back to college. Think back to weekends. Think back to the parties: raucous music, a few drinks, a dance or two, a few more drinks . . . your dancing partner is looking good. Maybe it takes one more drink to cinch it, but soon the two of you are sneaking back to your room, closing the door behind you and slipping into that hard, narrow dorm bed together. And sleeping. Really sleeping. That's not how you recall it? Sorry, flower child, but you've gone to seed.
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