FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 16, 1997 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority is considering asking gaming regulators to sanction Trump Hotels & Casino Resorts Inc., which could include revoking all three of its state casino licenses, on the grounds that the company's anti-tunnel stance is anti-competitive. The CRDA board headed into executive session to discuss that option in private yesterday before its members voted in public to fund up to $120 million in bonds to help finance the $330 million tunnel and roadway project that Trump Hotels has gone to court to try to stop.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A widow with three sons who worked her way up from an entry-level job to an executive position in an Atlantic City casino was appointed by Gov. Whitman yesterday to the New Jersey Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. Doris McClinton, 49, a resident of the resort's Northeast Inlet section and the Showboat Casino-Hotel's director of employee and community affairs, replaces Nicholas L. Ribis, chief executive officer of Trump Hotels and Casino Resorts Inc., for a two-year term on the board.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There is only an imaginary line separating this gambling resort from neighboring Ventnor, where residents say the influence of casino gaming has drastically changed their town - and not necessarily for the better. So yesterday, some of the people who live east of Little Rock Avenue in Ventnor had a lot to say in two public hearings about the state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority's $5 million "Downbeach District Housing Plan. " The CRDA is proposing to use casino-generated funding to address some of the problems that these residents - as well as people who live in the south Chelsea section of Atlantic City - say occurred after casino gaming was legalized in 1976.
NEWS
May 26, 1997 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The jitneys, a dilapidated, hard-driven fleet of 190 midget buses, are as familiar to this gambling resort as the cable car is to San Francisco. They are white. So are most of their owners, who are also the drivers. About 80 percent live out of town. The state wants more racial diversity and Atlantic City residents represented in the jitney drivers' seats. It hopes to accomplish that through a program hatched from a plan that would replace the worn fleet with dazzling new buses of robin's egg blue.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT This article contains information from the Associated Press
A judge yesterday threw out a highly criticized plan by the state to seize elderly widow Vera Coking's home and two nearby small businesses so the land could be used by casino mogul Donald Trump. Superior Court Judge Richard Williams said the attempt by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority to take the properties for a new parking lot and a public park at Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino was flawed because it did not guarantee that the company would not later use the land simply to expand the business.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Once upon a time, there was a peep-show business that paid taxes. But the United Adult Book Store at 1826 Atlantic Ave. was bought and torn down by the state's Casino Reinvestment Development Authority last year, becoming part of a vast inventory of land tax-exempt under state law. Hundreds of parcels are land banked by the agency, which is charged with taking a tax from casinos to be an agent of economic redevelopment. But with the Atlantic City economy tanking, many current projects are stalled, leaving empty lots and millions of dollars off tax rolls.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
When General Electric Co. breaks ground tomorrow for its new aerospace center along Camden's waterfront, it will have Harrah's Casino/Hotel Atlantic City and the Sands Hotel Casino to thank in some small part. The two gaming halls contributed almost $2 million toward the $65 million financial package. The contributions came through the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, a state agency formed in 1984 to oversee the investment of gambling-generated dollars for development in Atlantic City and other designated urban areas statewide.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
After a decades-long absence, the internationally known diving horse act will return to the Steel Pier this summer as part of an overhaul approved for Atlantic City that received unanimous backing from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority at its board meeting Wednesday. The Steel Pier renovation is being funded by a loan from the CRDA, and its approval came minutes after the master plan - the guidelines - for the newly created Atlantic City Tourism District was passed, 14-0, by the CRDA board.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez ruled Monday against Charlie Birnbaum, a piano tuner fighting to keep his family home near the former Revel casino from being seized by the state casino redevelopment authority. In a 27-page opinion issued Monday evening, Mendez said the state's enactment of the Tourism District Act is "the legislative declaration of a legitimate public purpose" that would justify the seizure of property by eminent domain. "The fundamental public purpose contained in this legislation is to promote tourism, to create and protect jobs in Atlantic City, and to assist the ailing gaming industry," Mendez wrote.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Staff Writer
Projects meant to bolster struggling Newark, New Jersey's largest city, have received millions of dollars from an unlikely source: the casinos 100 miles south. Atlantic City gambling halls in recent years have chipped in $1.5 million to expand housing at Seton Hall Law School, $2.8 million to open a preschool in the North Ward, and $500,000 to add space at a nonprofit environmental and ecological center. How the money got there has its origins in a political deal struck in the 1980s - a deal that Gov. Christie not only wants to undo, but whose unraveling would require the support of Democratic Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Camden County closed a $6.2 million deal Thursday to build apartments on the site of the old Pennsauken Mart on Route 130 in South Jersey. The Camden County Improvement Authority said it has reached a long-anticipated agreement with Delco Development of Willingboro. The Burlington County builder plans to put a 250-unit residential site on the property, according to the county. The project will also include amenities and retail outlets. In a statement, Pennsauken Mayor John Kneib said he was "excited to hear of the completed sale of the site.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
In cash-strapped Atlantic City, how much is Miss America worth? The state's Casino Reinvestment Development Authority on Tuesday approved a three-year, $12.5 million subsidy in a contract with Dick Clark Productions to keep the pageant in its ancestral home - and to promote the resort on New Year's Eve. The contract specifically runs through the end of the New Year's Rockin' Eve broadcast on Jan. 1, 2019. It calls for payments of $3.5 million, $3.75 million, and $4 million in each of the next three years, plus an additional $325,000 per competition to be put toward contestants' hotel costs, meals, and other activities in Atlantic City.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Once upon a time, there was a peep-show business that paid taxes. But the United Adult Book Store at 1826 Atlantic Ave. was bought and torn down by the state's Casino Reinvestment Development Authority last year, becoming part of a vast inventory of land tax-exempt under state law. Hundreds of parcels are land banked by the agency, which is charged with taking a tax from casinos to be an agent of economic redevelopment. But with the Atlantic City economy tanking, many current projects are stalled, leaving empty lots and millions of dollars off tax rolls.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The head of the John Brooks Recovery Center, who against the backdrop of Gov. Christie's viral speech on drug addiction sounded an alarm that his center would have to close, says the governor's office has summoned him to Trenton for a meeting. Alan Oberman said he would meet with Deputy Chief of Staff Amy Cradic on Monday. He said Cradic contacted him after stories appeared about the plight of the 119-bed inpatient center. "She called me saying the governor doesn't want to see us close," Oberman said Friday.
NEWS
November 7, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Gov. Christie is getting robust political traction - nearly six million views on Facebook at last count - with an impassioned speech recorded from Shooter's Tavern in Belmont, N.H., about treating drug addiction. But back in New Jersey, an Atlantic City inpatient treatment center that accounts for 10 percent of the state's long-term recovery beds has said it will close this spring - in part because the state's reimbursement rates are too low to sustain a move out of the tourism zone Christie set up. Alan Oberman, executive director of the John Brooks Recovery Center, said the state Casino Reinvestment Development Authority had also backed off a plan to fully finance the construction of a new 119-bed facility and that he has been unable to secure construction loans.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be poetry at the Farmers Market in Atlantic City after all. After the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority scrapped a proposal to pay poets at the Farmers Market because politicians complained about the spending, area poets offered to read their work free in the financially beleaguered city. Poets can relate. They're usually scrapped for cash, too. Galloway Township poet Joel Ollander and Aubrey Gerhardt, the founder of SJPoets, recruited other poets after the authority (CRDA)
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Charlie Birnbaum, the piano tuner who is fighting to keep his family home in Atlantic City from being seized by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority, delivered a petition Wednesday with more than 100,000 signatures to Gov. Christie. In addition, Birnbaum's attorneys are now arguing that Christie's plans for Atlantic City make the CRDA's efforts to seize his home even more questionable than when a Superior Court judge ruled the CRDA was within its rights to seize the house.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
As Atlantic City continues to suffer an economic free fall, state officials are contemplating turning to the private sector to jump-start development there. One proposal being reviewed by Gov. Christie and legislative leaders is the creation of a nonprofit development corporation that would help decide what projects to build. That could involve demolishing the shuttered Trump Plaza to create walkable retail and restaurant space and open sight lines, officials said. The nonprofit Atlantic City Development Corp.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Superior Court Judge Julio Mendez ruled Monday against Charlie Birnbaum, a piano tuner fighting to keep his family home near the former Revel casino from being seized by the state casino redevelopment authority. In a 27-page opinion issued Monday evening, Mendez said the state's enactment of the Tourism District Act is "the legislative declaration of a legitimate public purpose" that would justify the seizure of property by eminent domain. "The fundamental public purpose contained in this legislation is to promote tourism, to create and protect jobs in Atlantic City, and to assist the ailing gaming industry," Mendez wrote.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawyers for Atlantic City and the bankrupt Revel Casino Hotel are locked in an intensifying battle over as much as $30 million that Revel owes for property taxes and penalties. Atlantic City wants to sell the right to collect that money by auctioning a tax certificate on Dec. 11, but it can't do that without bankruptcy court permission. The city asked for that permission last month, saying it desperately needs the money to meet its budget. Revel's property-tax levy this year of about $38 million - based on an assessment of $1.15 billion - equals 19 percent of Atlantic City's $200 million in expected tax collections.
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