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IN THE NEWS

Cream Cheese

FOOD
April 24, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
How's this for a film plot: As the oldest of nine children, an established actress returns home to help her aging parents transition into retirement. In the process, she rediscovers her love for the old neighborhood. She moves back and opens a small cafe that becomes the heart of the community. Kelly McShain Tyree, 40, can star in this, her life story, with her husband, Robert Tyree, 42, playing himself - the actor who puts his career on hold to become the cafe's chef. The part of the sidekick will be played by Devitt McShain, 37, Kelly's younger brother.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2008
This Spinach and Black Bean Burger recipe from A Full Plate was created with the aid of co-owner Liz Peterson from the restaurant's standard process, but she cautioned that they don't use set amounts, preferring to "eyeball it. " SPINACH & BLACK BEAN BURGERS 12 ounces cooked black beans 10 ounces spinach 4 ounces salsa Bread crumbs Salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 hamburger rolls Mix the...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | By LARI ROBLING For the Daily News
IT'S A FAMILY affair in Fishtown. The owners of the comfortable Hot Potato Caf? are two sisters plus a sister-in-law. And, Kathryn, Claire and Erin Keller get their produce from another family member who owns Iovine Brothers Produce in the Reading Terminal Market. The cafe is located in a former State Store on Girard Avenue. The owners tossed about the name "Stewed Tomatoes. " Apparently that was unseemly to some family members. So, how do three sisters known as "Hot Potato" have more decorum?
NEWS
July 12, 2006 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Good cheese has always been one of the pillars that propped up the circus tent of the gastronomic extravaganza that is the annual Fancy Food Show. But rarely has it been a central theme in so many of the show's prizewinning products. The popularity of fine cheese has extended beyond the cheese board into mass production: in appetizers, desserts and biscuits - even a Hollywood promotion. The show's grand prize for Outstanding New Product was an extraordinary cheesecake with a pecan-shortbread crust (and a $45 online price tag)
NEWS
August 21, 2005 | By Miriam Hill INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I never thought I could stoop so low. But there I was asking Sotheby's, the grande dame of auction houses, if my dog could come to an interview. Nena, my gorgeous little spaniel, the one with the Farrah Fawcettesque hair and cuddling skills that could defrost the Grinch's heart, had me loopy in love. I would do anything to keep her. But surely, making this request of Sotheby's was more embarrassing than even the most aggressive crotch-sniffing. Like many great loves, Nena came with some issues.
FOOD
September 23, 2004 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
A package or tub of cream cheese in the refrigerator suggests dozens of delicious possibilities. Enjoy a schmear on your next bagel. Stir some into scrambled eggs, salad dressings or pasta. Stuff it into cored apples, split strawberries, celery stalks or snow pea pods. Add it to sauces or soups. Whip it up into pates and dips. Or make it into pastries, cheesecakes, frostings and other desserts. The versatility of cream cheese lies in its mellow yet slightly tangy flavor and smooth, moist texture.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Is the cheap, foil-wrapped cheesesteak about to vanish like dollar-a-gallon gasoline? Operators of Center City's ubiquitous lunch carts have begun tacking on quarters and half-dollars to the price of Philadelphia's signature sandwiches. For years, the cart owners swallowed temporary swings in the wholesale cost of meat, cheese and processed foods - but now some fear that inflation is here to stay. That sentiment, if it spreads, could spell trouble for professional inflation-fighters such as Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, who has been insisting that inflation is in check as the nation's economy rebounds.
FOOD
January 22, 2004 | By Bev Bennett FOR THE INQUIRER
January is the longest month of the year - or at least it feels that way. Though it's not the only 31-day month, January is the only one that seems twice the length, with each day more blustery than the one before. In fact, if I had my way I'd skip the month and burrow under the covers until February. Unfortunately, I don't have that luxury and I'll bet you don't, either. That's why I'm pampering myself with foods that give me some incentive to get out of bed. As much as I advocate cold, high-fiber breakfast cereals for their health value, I'll save those for later in the year.
NEWS
January 11, 2004 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Bonnie Foehr credits her success to cream cheese and orange marmalade. The culinary-arts student at Middle Bucks Institute of Technology in Jamison won a $4,000 scholarship to the Culinary Institute of America for her apple pie creation. "My secret is the ingredients in the piecrust," Foehr said. "I use cream cheese as a substitute for butter, and that gives a creamy texture. Once it comes out of the oven, I wipe orange marmalade on the outside, which makes it shiny and gives it flavor.
FOOD
December 18, 2003 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Easy yet elegant, that's the first impression conveyed by smoked salmon. It's what makes smoked salmon a perfect choice for any meal or occasion, from breakfast to late-night nibbles, for holiday brunches or company dinners. That simplicity and elegance have been Max Hansen's goal in food service since 1993, when he opened Max & Me, a gourmet-to-go retail store in Bucks County. Now a busy caterer and producer of smoked salmon, Hansen focuses on quality ingredients, simply prepared.
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