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Cream Of Mushroom Soup

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NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Most anything tastes good folded into the richness of macaroni and cheese, but in the mushroom mecca of Kennett Square, where the fungus is as fresh as it gets, there is a special irresistibility to a gooey slice of macaroni whose lily-shaped pasta tubes are studded with roasted maitakes, shiitakes, and oyster mushrooms. Add an indulgent Mornay sauce with good cheddar and gruyère, plus a little spark of Dijon mustard, and it is almost as if Talula's Table fused the macaroni casserole with a particularly sublime cream of mushroom soup, topped, of course, with crunchy garlic bread crumbs.
FOOD
October 13, 1999 | by Beverly Mills, with Alicia Ross, For the Daily News
Cream soups play a vital role in our Desperation pantries. They're such a staple we practically take them for granted. Then a conversation with one of our respected colleagues made us stop and think. "I'd never do a recipe with cream soup," she declared. "Why not?," we asked. "I just wouldn't. " The contorted look on her face told the rest of the story. For a couple of years afterward, we found ourselves second-guessing our cream-soup instincts. Finally, we decided to test the waters by printing one of our favorite skillet dinners that included a can of cream of mushroom soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2009
TUNA CASSEROLE certainly isn't a gourmet dish, but it's a homestyle favorite that can save money and put dinner on the table in a hurry. I took a typical recipe for this casserole and made some healthy changes. Using multi-grain pasta adds fiber and extra protein without altering the taste. Leaving out the cheddar cheese while stirring in reduced-fat cream of mushroom soup and fat-free milk cuts more calories. Instead of topping things off with crushed potato chips, I make my own fresh breadcrumbs with wheat bread and a little light butter.
FOOD
January 17, 1990 | By Bev Bennett, Special to The Inquirer
Duxelles is a magical French formula for transforming ordinary mushrooms into an ambrosial dish. When you're eating a really good stuffed mushroom or mushroom stuffing, it's probably duxelles. Although cooking mushrooms by some French technique might seem a bit exotic and complex, it's really just as easy as sauteing onions. For duxelles, mince a handful of mushrooms in a food processor or by hand. Just make sure the pieces are evenly small. Cook the mushrooms with minced shallots in butter.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the glare of spotlights, the huge maples and tulip poplars cast menacing shadows and the night fog shrouds the Rancocas Creek in mystery. That is the view through the picture windows of Flo's Lakeside Tavern, an informal bar-restaurant that opened in Hainesport a year ago. The setting is definitely rural, both inside and out, and if your culinary expectations are not too high, Flo's offers a pleasant, off-the-beaten-path excursion. The restaurant is in a converted house flanked by beds of yellow mums and incongruously framed by piers bound with hawser.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With dishes that range from very good to very poor and dining conditions for nonsmokers that border on the unbelievable, the oddly named neighborhood restaurant Fingers rolls on from year to year despite obstacles that might sink other places. Clearly, the good outweighs the bad at this mostly friendly place, but for an outsider, the bad is very noticeable. That's particularly true for those seeking to avoid cigarette smoke, for although most restaurants have long since redesignated their more attractive dining rooms for nonsmokers, Fingers bucks the trend by doing the opposite.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 19 years of reviewing restaurants, I have never before written about a cafeteria, but Boston Chicken is so exceptional it deserves your attention. The informal, self-serve restaurant in the Huntingdon Valley Shopping Center is one of several opened recently in the suburbs. There are others in Wayne and Media, and one is under construction in Bala Cynwyd. The franchise operation was started in Boston a couple of years ago and offers old-fashioned home cooking at low prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1986 | By STAN HOCHMAN, Daily News Restaurant Reviewer
The rack of lamb is no longer on the menu at the Gourmet restaurant. David, the lone waiter in the room, pauses breathlessly to explain that the price of lamb got too high, but that the rack is available at $19.50, and that it is done with a coating of bread crumbs and Dijon mustard. Forget the price. Order it. Get it done medium rare so that it's pink and juicy. Scrape away the bread crumb-mustard glop and enjoy. The lamb was the highlight of two visits to this curious Northeast establishment, where the menu seems culled from the back issues of Good Housekeeping, circa 1964.
NEWS
March 8, 1987 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its uniquely English setting and fine cuisine, Bentley's offers an uncommonly pleasant dining experience. The British influence is suggested not only by the restaurant's name and North Wales location, but also by an arcade of boutique dining rooms, each resembling a turn-of-the-century British shop. Real bolts of cloth line the walls of the Foxcroft fabric room just as they do in a real fabric store. Red upholstered chairs, red draperies and sparkling chandeliers give the jewel-box-like Drury Lane theater the style and intimacy of a West End theater.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Although not widely known, A & J Blue Claw, a charming restaurant in an unattractive setting just north of Cape May, is a wonderful outpost of culinary civility. Set in the marshlands between Cape May and Wildwood Crest, the pretty restaurant is flanked on three sides by a messy industrial area and a small marina where you can watch the boats through the restaurant's bay windows as they return to dock at the end of the day. The nicest part of this eight-year-old restaurant is a bright, cheery addition bounded on three sides by large picture and bay windows.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Most anything tastes good folded into the richness of macaroni and cheese, but in the mushroom mecca of Kennett Square, where the fungus is as fresh as it gets, there is a special irresistibility to a gooey slice of macaroni whose lily-shaped pasta tubes are studded with roasted maitakes, shiitakes, and oyster mushrooms. Add an indulgent Mornay sauce with good cheddar and gruyère, plus a little spark of Dijon mustard, and it is almost as if Talula's Table fused the macaroni casserole with a particularly sublime cream of mushroom soup, topped, of course, with crunchy garlic bread crumbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2009
TUNA CASSEROLE certainly isn't a gourmet dish, but it's a homestyle favorite that can save money and put dinner on the table in a hurry. I took a typical recipe for this casserole and made some healthy changes. Using multi-grain pasta adds fiber and extra protein without altering the taste. Leaving out the cheddar cheese while stirring in reduced-fat cream of mushroom soup and fat-free milk cuts more calories. Instead of topping things off with crushed potato chips, I make my own fresh breadcrumbs with wheat bread and a little light butter.
FOOD
September 26, 2001 | By Michael Roberts FOR THE INQUIRER
Call it the bomb-shelter mentality. But when catastrophe strikes, as it did Sept. 11, my first reaction is to go into hiding. It comes with being a child of the '50s. Remember the fortresses that Americans built in their basements before we realized that, on any given Sunday, the Soviet Union was not about to drop a bomb on us? What fascinated me most as a kid was wondering what people would eat in their shelters if the Cold War ignited. Things that came out of cans, no doubt - baked beans, Spam, tuna, cream of mushroom soup, SpaghettiOs - and things in jars - peanut butter, jelly.
NEWS
July 2, 2000 | By John V.R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With dishes that range from very good to very poor and dining conditions for nonsmokers that border on the unbelievable, the oddly named neighborhood restaurant Fingers rolls on from year to year despite obstacles that might sink other places. Clearly, the good outweighs the bad at this mostly friendly place, but for an outsider, the bad is very noticeable. That's particularly true for those seeking to avoid cigarette smoke, for although most restaurants have long since redesignated their more attractive dining rooms for nonsmokers, Fingers bucks the trend by doing the opposite.
FOOD
January 23, 2000 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sandy Cadwalader's culinary epiphany came 30 years ago in Mexico, where she was studying Spanish after graduating from Smith College. Having grown up in Blue Bell in a family that wasn't particularly food-focused, she had never regarded cooking as an art form, or eating as a foundation for good fellowship. But in Mexico, a French priest who took great delight in feeding the language students left an impression so profound that, two decades later, she wrote an essay about it: "An energetic whirlwind flying around in his guaraches, Francois was the kindest man I'd ever met and his endless favors seemed only to increase his capacity for joy. He was always laughing, and his booming laugh was never happier than when he could corral a group of people to cook for. "I remember the beaming grin on his face as he lugged home a giant red snapper from the fish market.
FOOD
January 12, 2000 | by Becky Batcha, For the Daily News
The sensible homemakers of the Delaware Valley did not exactly "hoard" tuna fish in anticipation of some millennial catastrophe that would end grocery shopping as we know it. They cannot even be said to have "stockpiled. " But quietly, perhaps even unconsciously, they picked up an extra can here and there during their regular weekly shopping trips in the final months of 1999. And those unremarkable transactions added up. In the inventory-control systems at Acme, individual shoppers' collective behavior registered as a quantifiable "uptick" in tuna sales, according grocery chain spokesman Walt Rubel.
FOOD
October 13, 1999 | by Beverly Mills, with Alicia Ross, For the Daily News
Cream soups play a vital role in our Desperation pantries. They're such a staple we practically take them for granted. Then a conversation with one of our respected colleagues made us stop and think. "I'd never do a recipe with cream soup," she declared. "Why not?," we asked. "I just wouldn't. " The contorted look on her face told the rest of the story. For a couple of years afterward, we found ourselves second-guessing our cream-soup instincts. Finally, we decided to test the waters by printing one of our favorite skillet dinners that included a can of cream of mushroom soup.
NEWS
June 17, 1998 | by Lauralee Dobbins, For the Daily News
Timing is everything. And in the case of Grill Fish and Co., a casual yet somewhat sophisticated new restaurant on Haddon Avenue in Westmont, the time is just right. Restaurateur Pete Delimaris, who previously operated the Spaghetti Castle on the same site, says he developed the concept for Grill Fish several years ago. He knew the time was ripe to bring it to fruition because of today's skyrocketing demand for freshly-prepared seafood. Delimaris must have a crystal ball. Just two months after opening, Grill Fish and Co. is bustling, even on a Tuesday night.
NEWS
December 10, 1997 | by Lauralee Dobbins, For the Daily News
A neighborhood restaurant is a treasure. In Washington Township, where neighborhoods bloom like azaleas in springtime, Steph 'n Ed's restaurant, sports bar and package goods complex is a reliable fixture featuring a comprehensive menu and a choice of venues. A unique feature of this four-year-old operation is that the sports bar/package goods facility is in a separate building from the dining room, which also has a bar and an outdoor deck. This is particularly nice for those diners who prefer the hum of conversation to the cacophony of hooting and hollering sports fans.
FOOD
January 12, 1994 | By Cathy Barber, FOR THE INQUIRER
When the going gets tough, the tough pick up the can opener. Cream soups, canned beans and vegetables, quick-cooking rice, instant mashed potatoes, pasta and onion soup mix form the backbone of the pronto pantry. Top meat choices are ground meat and skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, with tuna making a strong showing. When pressed for time, cooks invariably opt for one-dish meals, either baked or assembled stovetop, in a skillet. Some people have embraced the new generation of low-fat products, sculpting meals around cheese, sour cream and other reduced-fat items.
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