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Creationism

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NEWS
June 21, 1987
The Supreme Court did the only thing it could have last week when it ruled unconstitutional a Louisiana law requiring that any public school that taught evolution must teach creationism as well. Creationism, or "creation science" as it is sometimes called, is based on the belief that the universe was created by God as set forth in the biblical account in Genesis. No matter how one sliced it or diced it, creationism is religious belief, and requiring that it be taught is a violation of the Constitution's requirement that there be a division between church and state.
NEWS
May 6, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Supreme Court, acting in a case reminiscent of the famous 1925 Scopes "monkey trial," announced yesterday that it would decide next year whether states may require public schools that teach evolution to teach creationism theory as well. The case came from Louisiana, which enacted a law in 1981 requiring the state's public schools to "give balanced treatment to creation-science and to evolution-science. " Supporters of the law say that creation-science, though ardently endorsed by fundamentalist religions, does not openly advocate the biblical account of the genesis of man. Rather, they argue, it teaches that highly developed forms of life appeared suddenly thousands of years ago. The theory of evolution, on the other hand, concludes that the Earth is billions of years old and that elementary life forms began developing slowly millions of years ago. The legal question accepted for a decision by the high court next year is whether the Louisiana law endorses religion and therefore violates the constitutional principle of separation of church and state.
NEWS
July 3, 2005 | By Richard Dawkins
Science feeds on mystery. As my colleague Matt Ridley has put it, "Most scientists are bored by what they have already discovered. It is ignorance that drives them on. " Science mines ignorance. Mystery - that which we don't yet know; that which we don't yet understand - is the mother lode that scientists seek out. Mystics exult in mystery and want it to stay mysterious. Scientists exult in mystery for a very different reason: It gives them something to do. Maybe we don't understand yet, but we're working on it. Each mystery solved opens up vistas of unsolved problems, and the scientist eagerly moves in. Admissions of ignorance and mystification are vital to good science.
NEWS
August 4, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Republican state representative calls it a matter of academic freedom. Science-education advocates claim it's nothing but a backdoor attempt to allow public schools to discuss Bible-based creationism. Rep. Stephen Bloom (R., Cumberland) circulated a memo to his colleagues Thursday seeking cosponsors for planned legislation to allow students in public elementary and secondary schools to question or critique "the scientific strengths and weaknesses of existing scientific theories.
NEWS
June 29, 1987 | BY DONALD KAUL
Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states may not require their public schools to teach creationism - that is, a strictly literal biblical interpretation of the origins of Earth and man - as scientific fact. This made the League of Religious Nuts and other pious organizations unhappy and evolutionists ecstatic. I take the middle way. I say it's a good first step. Creationism holds that God created the universe and all life forms some 10,000 years ago, after which he created man, in His own image.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Curtis worries that the teaching of evolution in schools is steering young people away from God and the Bible. So the Bible scholar is running an institute here to promote the literal bibilical version of creation. Meanwhile, professor Donald Wise fears that the growing influence of literal creationists like Curtis will deprive children of an understanding of contemporary science. Wise, who teaches geology at Franklin and Marshall College here, is using his science knowledge to debunk creationist views that man and the universe were created in six days, that Noah's flood killed the dinosaurs, and that the Earth is only 6,000 years old. Creationists "are a very powerful and influential group," said Wise.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | By Zlati Meyer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A recent Pennridge High School graduate has challenged the school district in federal court, contending that his free-speech rights were violated by a policy that requires administrators to review his creationism literature before he distributed it. The Rutherford Institute, a civil-liberties group based in Charlottesville, Va., filed the suit on behalf of Joe Baker, 19, of Perkasie, who has battled the school district for months. On March 15, Baker passed out flyers in which he took issue with what he said were errors in the school's biology textbooks.
NEWS
September 7, 2008 | Arthur Caplan
Arthur Caplan is chairman of the medical-ethics department at the University of Pennsylvania There has been no end of reaction to Sen. John McCain's selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his vice presidential pick. After the initial "Sarah who?" response from those in the other 49 states, some commentators have decided it was brilliant to place a dynamic young woman at McCain's side. Despite Palin's boisterous coming-out speech at the Republican convention, I think McCain has actually thrown away any chance he had of being elected because the selection of Palin puts an issue on the table that McCain may find exceedingly uncomfortable to have to wrestle with over the next two months.
NEWS
October 28, 2005 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since the landmark trial on the teaching of intelligent design began five weeks ago, a parade of academic experts has appeared in federal court to debate complex scientific theories and make arcane philosophical and religious points about evolution. But the case is likely to boil down to one question: Was the decision by the Dover, Pa., school board in 2004 to approve a curriculum policy requiring the introduction of intelligent design religiously motivated, and thus unconstitutional?
NEWS
September 2, 1986
Seventy-two Nobel Prize winners - all of them American - filed an extraordinary legal brief with the U.S. Supreme Court last month. The brief asks the court to strike down a Louisiana law that would require public schools to teach "creationism," which basically is the biblical version of how life came to be on this planet. In Arkansas and elsewhere, the federal courts have ruled against teaching creationism, asserting that it is Christian doctrine posing as science to slip through the schoolhouse door.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brownstein Group and Vault Communications are in similar businesses: advertising and public relations, which means their success depends largely on people - who can set up shop anywhere. Brownstein is in Center City, while Vault is in Plymouth Meeting, and the tax consequences of their locations separate them far more than the 19 miles between their offices. Vault pays a business privilege tax of 0.15 percent and no local net income tax in Plymouth Township. Brownstein's tax bill in Philadelphia includes a 6.45 percent corporate income tax, a 0.1415 percent gross receipts tax, a 1.13 percent use and occupancy tax, and a 2 percent city sales tax. That heavier tax burden, coupled with the Philadelphia wage tax that is nearly four times higher than the average in the suburbs, has long handicapped the city's job growth.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Despite opposition from three South Jersey public-school officials, a controversial proposal to create a non-public football conference sailed through the NJSIAA's executive committee on Wednesday. The endorsement by the state organization's most powerful committee means the proposal will be presented to the NJSIAA's general membership in December. A majority vote of the general membership will result in the formation of a state-wide, non-public football conference for the 2016 season, dramatically changing the landscape of the sport in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday said Gov. Christie's "moribund" affordable-housing agency had failed to do its job, and effectively transferred the agency's regulatory authority to lower courts. The ruling brought something of a resolution to a decade of litigation over the agency's proposed rules to determine municipalities' housing obligations for low- and moderate-income residents. For years, developers, cities and towns, environmentalists, and the state have wrestled with how to create affordable housing in a state where hundreds of thousands of residents struggle to pay the rent.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Along hundreds of miles of railroad tracks, mourners stood silently, reverently, as a doleful whistle and wisps of smoke and steam announced the approaching funeral train. Many wept and bowed their heads as it passed. In towns where the locomotive stopped, thousands surged forward, pushing and jostling to get a better view. Bands played melancholy tunes and preachers offered up solemn prayers. They focused on a dark maroon railcar, swathed in black crepe, carrying the martyred Abraham Lincoln, who had come on another train four years earlier to tell throngs at Independence Hall that he'd "rather be assassinated on this spot than surrender" the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billy Blaise Dufala's usual destination for art supplies doesn't offer oil paints, archival paper, or sable brushes. But it does have new inventory daily - tons of it, brought in by the truckload from construction sites and 1-800-GOT-JUNK pickups. As he wanders, wearing a hard hat and reflective vest, among mountains of wood pallets, concrete rubble, and twisted metal at Revolution Recovery in Tacony, he's intrigued by a tattered but, it turns out, functional patio umbrella, a perfectly good roll of roofing vinyl, and a stuffed likeness of a New Kids on the Block-era Jordan Knight, still in its box. Uncovering potential within society's castoffs is at the core of the nonprofit Recycled Artist in Residency (RAIR)
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | BY CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writer stansbc@phillynews.com, 215-854-5914
TOM WOLF, the Democratic candidate for governor, pulled up a chair yesterday and asked three small-business owners about their "trials and tribulations. " Tentatively, each began to rattle off suggestions during his visit to the Welcoming Center for New Pennsylvanians, on JFK Boulevard near 16th Street. "I enjoyed the experience," said Latasha Sampson, owner of the Chocolate City Salon & Spa in South Philadelphia. "It's interesting to have a person of that level sit down and listen to our concerns.
NEWS
January 5, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
As shivering but curious passersby stopped to watch, holding up scarves to shield their faces from below-freezing winds, Kevin Gregory lifted a 10-pound Eagles helmet made of ice onto a clear, frozen podium. "Couldn't have asked for better weather - except for the sun," said Gregory, founder of Ice Concepts and the Eagles' unofficial go-to ice sculptor, on the 15-degree morning Friday. Gregory, 45, has been carving ice since 1994, most of that time with his business partner, Antonio Young.
NEWS
August 4, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis and Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A Republican state representative calls it a matter of academic freedom. Science-education advocates claim it's nothing but a backdoor attempt to allow public schools to discuss Bible-based creationism. Rep. Stephen Bloom (R., Cumberland) circulated a memo to his colleagues Thursday seeking cosponsors for planned legislation to allow students in public elementary and secondary schools to question or critique "the scientific strengths and weaknesses of existing scientific theories.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia City Council will not take up a proposal to create a new water and sewer rate-making body until after the council's summer recess ends in September. City Council President Darrell L. Clarke on Wednesday delayed a vote on creating the board, which city voters authorized last November. The bill would create a new independent board of five mayoral appointees that could approve rates, which are now determined by the water commissioner. Council's Committee on Law and Government approved on the bill on June 11.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Every so often, the classical music world decides to advance into the visual age with busy video screens, often with interesting outcome, though ultimately feeling redundant because everything you need to see is in the music already. Symphony in C's particularly vivid reading of Haydn's The Creation Saturday at Camden's Gordon Theater conjured the Book of Genesis (on which it's based) perfectly well with no visuals of birds, animals or Adam and Eve that are sometimes seen with the piece.
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