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Creativity

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BUSINESS
October 18, 1990 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
We will never know how much Basil Fawlty, the hilariously misanthropic and inept innkeeper of Torquay, might have been helped by one of John Cleese's inspirational talks, and that's undoubtedly for the best. Life at Fawlty Towers might have been less hellish if Basil had learned to loosen up and stop insulting those German tourists, but Cleese's legions of fans would have been the losers. But, Cleese reflected yesterday, listening to a speech on creativity in business wouldn't have done Basil a bit of good anyway.
NEWS
November 18, 1990 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Monika Steinberg, director at the Institute for Creative Education, enjoys posing this riddle to teachers at the start of her creativity seminars: There's a man at home. He is wearing a mask. There is a man coming home. What is happening? Josephine Iadevaia and Susan Polk, two teachers who attended Wednesday's institute seminar at the Education Information and Resource Center in Sewell, sat silently in their chairs for a minute. They were pondering Steinberg's riddle. Both were dumbstruck.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After two years of research, the husband-and-wife team of John and Sylvia Baer have concluded that the increasingly popular core curriculum in schools stimulates creativity. In February, John Baer, who teaches education at Rider University in Lawrenceville, and Sylvia Baer, an instructor of English literature at Gloucester County College, presented a paper on "The Impact of the Core Knowledge Curriculum on Creativity" at the annual meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association in Orlando, Fla. "A core curriculum, what some would call a standard body of knowledge, has been developed in many states to promote a systematic education," John Baer said.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Learn how you and your children can become more creative during a seminar at Children's Learning Center from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Gail Jones, an early childhood educator, will speak to parents of the learning center and their guests. The program, said Jones, will help parents foster creativity in their children. The program is free and will be held at Children's Learning Center, 748 Stoney Hill Rd. in Yardley. For information, call Pat Miiller at 215-498-8048. OPEN HOUSE Childtowne Montessori Preschool and Day Care Center will hold an open house from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1989 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tenor saxophonist David Murray will share the billing with poet/playwright Amiri Baraka when the Painted Bride Art Center continues its Kuumba celebration of Afro-American creativity tomorrow night. At 33, Murray has established himself as a leading figure among jazz's tenor sax players. His style can be blusteringly gruff or seductively romantic, in the tradition established by Coleman Hawkins and carried on by Archie Shepp and Albert Ayler. In addition to his reputation as a player, Murray has gained considerable attention as a composer, arranger and band leader.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By Mary Blakinger INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Author Dan Wakefield, whose novels Going All the Way and Starting Over were turned into movies, will talk about injecting creativity into daily life during a free public program at 7:30 p.m. next Friday in the chapel at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, 625 Montgomery Ave., Bryn Mawr. Wakefield also will lead a workshop titled "Writing Your Spiritual Autobiography" from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. March 31 at the church ministries center. The $25 workshop admission fee covers lunch. Wakefield, a novelist, journalist and screenwriter, has written extensively about his spiritual rebirth.
NEWS
August 11, 1994 | By Jayne Feld, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In Jude Burkhauser's studio is a colored-pencil sketch of the torso of a woman, nude, crouching, the skin of one breast peeled off in a moon-shaped slice. The work, New Moon Slice, is dark, haunting, disturbing. It also is empowering, the artist says. Burkhauser, a breast-cancer survivor, is convinced that art has life- affirming powers - spiritual powers that help the ill focus on healing. So she is heading a local drive, part of a national movement, to develop a registry of women who have used the creative process in overcoming breast cancer and to exhibit their works.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1993 | By Nancy Goldner, INQUIRER DANCE CRITIC
Homing in on the creative process, the Pew Charitable Trusts announced yesterday a new funding program to support the development of new choreography by artists in the Philadelphia area. The Philadelphia Repertory Development Initiative will make grants totaling $440,000 over three years. An additional $185,000 will go toward the cost of administering the program. A total of 14 grants will be awarded each year, starting Sept. 1. Professional dance companies may apply for grants up to $20,000 per year, and individual choreographers and dancers will qualify for as much as $10,000 a year.
NEWS
September 21, 1996
A quirky example of the law of unintended consequences is thriving at Ninth and Girard, the grittiest section of Philadelphia's federally funded empowerment zone. A cutting-edge arts collaborative called The Hut has transformed a long abandoned church there into a freewheeling studio/hangout/art business center. The Hut houses 10 businesses and employs 25 people in jobs such as sculpting, carpentry, advertising, video filmmaking and construction of World Wide Web sites. Its success both surprises and delights officials of the zone, which aims to bring new businesses, new jobs and fresh community spirit to three poor city neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A kid raised in a blue-collar home in Los Angeles, who got into trouble in school, who managed to scrape his way into an acting and directing career, and then went on to create a world-renowned film festival that changed the fortunes of independent filmmakers . . . . . . Even a person like that, even a person like Robert Redford, can screw it up. Redford's faults: hiring badly, impatience, inability to communicate, ineffective relations with...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Paul McCartney keeps a piano bedside to try out musical ideas that come to him in the middle of the night. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin ( The West Wing , Sports Night ) overcomes writer's block by taking six or more showers a day. And John Kounios, a pioneer in the study of insight, rides the quiet Regional Rail car on his commute to and from his West Chester home so he can carve out a creative, idea-inducing space for himself. The Drexel University professor of psychology further isolates himself by donning noise-canceling Bose headphones (to block the rumble of the train)
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The statistics would make anyone's grandmother cringe in shame. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans jammed 35 million tons of food waste into landfills in 2013. Food waste leads to more greenhouse gases, which in turn contributes to climate change. Wasted food represents wasted resources and calories that hungry people could be eating. Another less significant but no less valid concern for serious cooks: It's tons of wasted flavor. Though the EPA has been pushing the idea that Americans should generate less waste at home through videos like "Feed People Not Landfills," new ideas about how restaurants, food-service providers, and stores can do the same are coming to the forefront.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
A Mendelssohn Club concert? An edgy new work by the Leah Stein Dance Company? Or a guided meditation? With Turbine , the new site-specific dance/choral work premiering this weekend at the Fairmount Water Works, all three descriptions apply. Fifty-eight choristers and 18 dancers will perform among the trees, near the gazebo and other Water Works sites - while also (when possible) taking the audience with them. "Blend your voices into sounds within and beyond the trees," reads the first page of the score by Seattle composer Byron Au Yong.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Ta'Quan Allen's first role was Little Simba in a Camden elementary school production of The Lion King . "I got up there," he recalls, "and I actually nailed it. " Now 19, Allen - a 2014 graduate of the city's Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy - is setting his sights on bigger stages. "My job now," he says, "is freelancing my talents. " So far, so good. In February, Allen spent two weeks working for MTV in New York, where he was a production assistant for the stand-up, hip-hop comedy show Nick Cannon Presents: Wild 'N Out . Allen was on the set as episodes for the forthcoming season on MTV were taped live at the midtown concert venue Terminal 5. "I wanted to cry every second, because I was around everything I ever dreamed of," Allen says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
  Zymir has his heart set on becoming a fashion designer and developing his own brand of "Z" jeans. In fact, he already has made a sketch of them. That's quite ambitious for an 11-year-old, even one as stylish and creative as Zymir. During a recent visit to Philadelphia University's fashion design department, he watched several garments being made and learned the process start to finish. He also got some tips from designer Jay McCarroll, winner of the debut Project Runway competition in 2004.
FOOD
December 19, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Unlike, say, Thanksgiving's green bean casserole, or Hanukkah latkes, what we drink during the winter season isn't necessarily rooted in immovable tradition and high-pressure expectation. And while a glass of supermarket eggnog never goes out of style for some folks, there's plenty of room for innovation in holiday cocktails. Swapping out spirits, going homemade with mixers, adding a new flavor profile with spices or different bitters - all can improve upon or reinvigorate the classics without radically disturbing the toddy-loving status quo. After all, these traditions exist for good reason.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
Coloring outside the lines is a relative concept in the tyrannically ritualized world of classical music. Creativity is welcome - but please, nothing too creative. In reformatting the piano recital Wednesday night at the Kimmel Center the way he did, Jeremy Denk knew he'd better have a compelling justification. Happily, his point in amassing a half-hour block interspersing Schubert and Janácek was something more than a concert-hall invasion of the iPod Shuffle aesthetic. Others on this Philadelphia Chamber Music Society series have manipulated presentation - a joint recital by pianist Richard Goode and soprano Sarah Schafer comes to mind.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom "Chico" Stafford is an imposing figure - both physically, at 5-foot-10, 240 pounds, and by what comes out of his mouth. He apologizes for cursing but says he gets frustrated with his African American community. What especially riles the 64-year-old serial entrepreneur are those who ask for handouts and those who allow money to define them. The latter has happened to hip-hop culture, Stafford said, with rappers whose lyrics degrade women and celebrate drugs and gross consumerism getting all the attention - and a good deal of sales.
REAL_ESTATE
December 7, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
After passing through the property's security gate, rolling up the long drive, finding the 65-foot-long cobblestone courtyard (with pond and waterfall), and seeing what frames that courtyard - a transformed barn with adjacent (also transformed) farmer's cottage, all stone, all picture-perfect - a visitor wonders: Is there a dress code to get in? The answer: No. Linda Thatcher Raichle greets the caller wearing denim. Husband John Duda is barefoot. In their 60s and with previous marriages behind them, the couple are, it seems, as delighted with their Media, Delaware County, home as they are with each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
If Michael could spend a day doing anything he wanted, he'd play sports, go hiking, and visit a playground. Better yet, the day would be Halloween, the best holiday of all because he can dress up and play a role in a world spun from his vivid imagination. Creative, curious about everything around him - that's 12-year-old Michael. In school, where he receives special education services, math is his favorite subject, and he gets along well with his teachers and classmates. He also likes to dance, and loves baseball, football, and basketball, which he plays in a school club.
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