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Creativity

BUSINESS
February 28, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Physically, the Corzo Center for the Creative Economy at University of the Arts is little more than a tiny lounge, seeming far too small to contain the force in perpetual motion that is Neil Kleinman. Not that it matters. Kleinman's mission as the center's director encompasses the whole city, and he seems to be exploring every pocket of Philadelphia for partners willing to support it. One day, he's at the Free Library; another, at Drexel University or the People's Emergency Center in West Philadelphia, or the offices of accountants and patent lawyers whose volunteer help he solicits.
NEWS
February 25, 2016
By Nancy Gerber The current trend of increasing sales of adult coloring books points to an unmet need in many people's lives for some quiet, creative time. The books also highlight how the creation of art can diminish stress, increase imagination, and foster thoughtfulness. However, many of those coloring books are also marketed as "art therapy. " Lost in the enthusiastic response to the trend is the distinction that coloring, indeed a therapeutic activity, is not actually psychotherapy.
NEWS
February 16, 2016 | By Lilo H. Stainton, NJ Spotlight
There are two New Jerseys, particularly when it comes to public health. There are the urban hubs, older cities in the north and central Jersey with their mix of poverty and prosperity, often sitting side by side with affluent suburbs. And there are the vast rural stretches, including much of the state's south, with its farming communities and former waterfront factory towns. They both face many of the same public health issues: childhood obesity, undiagnosed and untreated diseases such as diabetes and cancer, smoking, and opioid addiction.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
I'm sitting here trying to write the first paragraphs for this article, and the pressure is on. The story is about a Penn professor who teaches creativity, for God's sake, meaning I'd better come up with something creative or he will think I'm dull. Worse, my readers will quit this story and turn to a report about some sports team that wears green jerseys. Wouldn't it be great if there were a proven method I could use to alleviate my anxiety and devise something creative, other than the traditional techniques of lining my paper clips up by size, biting my nails, and drinking coffee?
NEWS
September 20, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna W. Pitz, 65, of Paoli, former executive director of the GreenSpace Alliance and a major figure in the open-space movement in Southeastern Pennsylvania, died Friday, Sept. 11, of multiple system atrophy at Tel Hai Retirement Community, Honey Brook. Born in East Stroudsburg, Pa., Ms. Pitz graduated in 1971 from Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa, with a bachelor's degree in biology and education. In 1978, she earned a master's degree in landscape architecture from the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, N.Y. From 2008 to 2011, when she resigned for health reasons, Ms. Pitz led the GreenSpace Alliance, a nonprofit in Philadelphia consisting of the leaders of environmental groups and land conservation agencies.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Paul McCartney keeps a piano bedside to try out musical ideas that come to him in the middle of the night. Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin ( The West Wing , Sports Night ) overcomes writer's block by taking six or more showers a day. And John Kounios, a pioneer in the study of insight, rides the quiet Regional Rail car on his commute to and from his West Chester home so he can carve out a creative, idea-inducing space for himself. The Drexel University professor of psychology further isolates himself by donning noise-canceling Bose headphones (to block the rumble of the train)
FOOD
June 26, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
The statistics would make anyone's grandmother cringe in shame. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, Americans jammed 35 million tons of food waste into landfills in 2013. Food waste leads to more greenhouse gases, which in turn contributes to climate change. Wasted food represents wasted resources and calories that hungry people could be eating. Another less significant but no less valid concern for serious cooks: It's tons of wasted flavor. Though the EPA has been pushing the idea that Americans should generate less waste at home through videos like "Feed People Not Landfills," new ideas about how restaurants, food-service providers, and stores can do the same are coming to the forefront.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
A Mendelssohn Club concert? An edgy new work by the Leah Stein Dance Company? Or a guided meditation? With Turbine , the new site-specific dance/choral work premiering this weekend at the Fairmount Water Works, all three descriptions apply. Fifty-eight choristers and 18 dancers will perform among the trees, near the gazebo and other Water Works sites - while also (when possible) taking the audience with them. "Blend your voices into sounds within and beyond the trees," reads the first page of the score by Seattle composer Byron Au Yong.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Ta'Quan Allen's first role was Little Simba in a Camden elementary school production of The Lion King . "I got up there," he recalls, "and I actually nailed it. " Now 19, Allen - a 2014 graduate of the city's Creative Arts Morgan Village Academy - is setting his sights on bigger stages. "My job now," he says, "is freelancing my talents. " So far, so good. In February, Allen spent two weeks working for MTV in New York, where he was a production assistant for the stand-up, hip-hop comedy show Nick Cannon Presents: Wild 'N Out . Allen was on the set as episodes for the forthcoming season on MTV were taped live at the midtown concert venue Terminal 5. "I wanted to cry every second, because I was around everything I ever dreamed of," Allen says.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
  Zymir has his heart set on becoming a fashion designer and developing his own brand of "Z" jeans. In fact, he already has made a sketch of them. That's quite ambitious for an 11-year-old, even one as stylish and creative as Zymir. During a recent visit to Philadelphia University's fashion design department, he watched several garments being made and learned the process start to finish. He also got some tips from designer Jay McCarroll, winner of the debut Project Runway competition in 2004.
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