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BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Move over, Sierra Club and Elvis fans. Caesars World Inc. has joined your ranks as a credit-card sponsor, the first casino company in the nation to put its name on a major piece of plastic. Since the inception of the Caesars program in Atlantic City a year and a half ago, the resort chain has enrolled more than 20,000 MasterCard holders. Credit-card users receive cash rebates and discounts to restaurants, shows and shops in the chain. Caesars World became part of a growing number of credit-card sponsors that appeal to groups of consumers with common interests.
SPORTS
February 1, 2008 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bill usually belongs to Tom Brady, because he is the quarterback and, after all, it is his responsibility. Linemen have to eat. Quarterbacks have to pay. But when the crowd swelled at a Scottsdale restaurant Tuesday night, with defensive players joining in on the offense's dinner, a good old-fashioned game of credit- card roulette determined who would pick up the tab. For offensive tackle Nick Kaczur, guard Stephen Neal and defensive lineman...
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Charles Dickens tale A Christmas Carol were updated to fit these times, Scrooge probably wouldn't bother gathering his hoard of cash to buy last-minute gifts for Tiny Tim and the others. He'd simply pull out a credit card and worry about the bill later. At least, that's how thousands of people in Scrooge's income bracket pay for their holiday purchases each year. And when it is finally time to pay the bill about 30 days or so later, bankers in South Jersey say, the credit-card customers rarely complain that they are being charged more than twice the prime interest rate on their purchases.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Advanta Corp. yesterday reported a steep decline in profit from its small-business credit cards in the first quarter, as the slumping economy caused more borrowers to fall behind in their payments. Even so, the Spring House company's class B shares jumped 16.45 percent, or $1.24, to $8.78 in Nasdaq trading yesterday because the earnings were better than expected. Advanta said its credit card operation earned $6.67 million in the first quarter, off sharply from $21.17 million in the same period a year earlier.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: First Union cuts jobs PhilEx reduces fees MBNA chief recovering Do gamblers borrow more? Casino operator Harrah's Entertainment Inc. has tapped MBNA America Bank of Wilmington to sell cards to 23 million gamblers who have registered at the company's casinos, restaurants and hotels from Atlantic City to Las Vegas, according to Harrah's spokesman Gary Thompson. Heavy users win discounts at Harrah's, Rio and Showboat casinos and casino-hotels.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
One adult and three juveniles have been charged with using a stolen Discover card to steal $1,500 worth of merchandise, Newtown Township police said. The credit card, stolen June 27 from a home in the 500 block of Atwood Court, was used from June 28 to July 3 for purchases at 14 shops in the Oxford Valley and Neshaminy Malls and the I. Goldberg outdoor clothing store in Philadelphia, investigating police Sgt. Charles Patton said. Quincy J. Connor, 18, of the Americana Terrace apartments in Morrisville, has been charged with criminal attempt and six counts each of conspiracy, theft by unlawful taking, theft of property lost, receiving stolen property and forgery.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police believe that the man who gunned down Assistant Burlington County Prosecutor Rick Barbour went shopping in Center City 12 hours after the shooting and tried to use one of Barbour's credit cards to pay for his purchase. Philadelphia homicide detectives said yesterday that the suspect was with two other men when he tried to make a purchase using Barbour's Discover card. In addition, the man showed a New Jersey ID card as a backup, with Barbour's name but his own photo pasted on. Police declined to release the name of the store.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By LAURENCE S. SEIDMAN
The Clintons have their hearts in the right place concerning health care: They want universal coverage, an end to the barrier of "a pre-existing medical condition," and a guarantee that a person's coverage "can never be taken away" by losing a job or becoming ill. Their determination is in sharp contrast to the complacency of the occupants of the White House during the preceding dozen years. But their heads have let down their hearts. They have succumbed to political advice warning them not to propose replacing private health insurance with government health insurance.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  American Express unveiled a new effort Friday to combat credit-card fraud with a big assist - from President Obama. He announced the American Express Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program during a news conference in Washington, detailing a $10 million initiative designed to help merchants defray the cost of replacing check-out terminals with ones that will accept secure, chip-based credit cards. So-called EMV technology offers greater payment security by storing data on a chip embedded in a credit card, assuming payment terminals are equipped to read the chip.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having agreed to buy Advanta Corp.'s vast but troubled credit-card business, Fleet Financial Group yesterday put one of the industry's most powerful executives in charge. Joseph W. Saunders, Household International credit-card chief, was named chairman and chief executive of Fleet's credit-card unit. The move was disclosed by Household and confirmed by Fleet yesterday, surprising senior Advanta officials who hadn't been told of the move. Saunders, 52, who is also chairman of MasterCard International's Global Board of Directors, will fill the vacuum left by the abrupt departure of Advanta chief executive Alex W. Hart and credit-card chief James Allhusen.
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NEWS
February 19, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dave Muha is Big Man on Campus. After lunch in a dining hall at the College of New Jersey, he finds tweets about Muha sightings. He spots his name on T-shirts that raised a record amount of money for last year's freshman class. Every so often, he trends on Twitter as students pray to him, praise him, and plead with him. He can't even buy jeans an hour from the Mercer County campus without being confronted with his fame. "I pass my credit card to the clerk, who looks . . . and then gasps," he said.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a filmmaker known for his movies' plot twists, M. Night Shyamalan said he did not see this one coming. The woman he trusted to look after his children and manage his home in Chester County for about six years was sentenced Wednesday to three to 23 months in prison, followed by a year of probation, for stealing money from Shyamalan and his wife. Selma Nolan Cody, 34, of Reading, pleaded guilty in Chester County Court on Dec. 8 to third-degree felony theft. She bought more than $15,000 worth of goods and services without the Shyamalans' permission, using a credit card they had given her to manage their house in Willistown Township.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
PATCO riders will soon be able to use their Freedom cards to pay fares on SEPTA subways and buses, PATCO and SEPTA officials said Wednesday. However, SEPTA-issued smart cards won't work on PATCO. After SEPTA switches to its long-awaited electronic "smart card" fare-payment system this year, PATCO cards will be compatible with the SEPTA Key system, PATCO general manager John Rink said. One caveat: A PATCO card must be registered with PATCO. That registration will permit SEPTA to identify the user and bill PATCO for the trip, Rink said.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every day, Miss Anna comes to the Gallery - and on Tuesday, she was particularly elegant, in a long purple sweater, fashionable hairstyle, her eyebrows etched in darkly, perfectly arched. "Her brother died two years ago," said George Thomas, who owns the Creative Silver jewelry kiosk on the ground floor. "She was crushed. If I don't see Miss Anna for two days, I worry. I call her. " Who will worry about Anna Mazella, an Aramark retiree in her 80s, when Thomas closes his business - not by choice - at the end of the month?
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The prosecution in Don Tollefson's fraud trial rested its case Friday afternoon after scores of people testified that he had ripped them off through a sports ticket-selling scheme. The former Philadelphia sportscaster is already facing hurdles as he mounts his defense, which is expected to start Monday. Tollefson, who is representing himself, told a Bucks County Court judge on Friday that he could not afford the nearly $90 he will need to subpoena 25 of his witnesses. Those witnesses, who apparently have not agreed to willingly testify, include Howie Roseman, executive vice president of the Eagles.
NEWS
December 3, 2014
T HE PRESSURE is on this holiday season. Cashiers will be pushing store-issued credit. And for many of you, the pushiness isn't pleasant. Yet you cave. Credit.com found that 31 percent of shoppers felt store clerks "bullied" them into opening store-branded credit accounts. During the holiday shopping season, 28 percent of consumers said they succumbed and signed up. But it turns out the discounts dangled to get people to give in aren't enough to overcome the regrets they have later.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | MICHELLE SINGELTARY, Washington Posts Writers Group
WE'VE BECOME a nation charmed by offers that something might be free. Especially when it comes to credit. Many consumers will receive offers as they shop for the holidays. Professionals call these promotions "deferred-interest plans. " But more commonly the advertising may say something like: "No interest for 18 months" or "0 percent interest for 12 months. " This is credit with a catch. And if you are caught, it's expensive. The no-interest deals involve getting a credit card on which your purchases will be charged.
NEWS
November 12, 2014
ISSUE | GRIDLOCK Well water's fine I'm absolutely flabbergasted by the thought that the metaphorical well could possibly be any more poisoned than it already is ("Boehner warns Obama not to 'poison the well,' " Oct. 7). House Speaker John Boehner initiated a court case to punish President Obama for a minor tweak of the Affordable Care Act. Fellow House Republicans have been perfectly happy to twiddle their thumbs while unemployment, as a result of the burst housing bubble, continues at unacceptable levels.
NEWS
October 25, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA's long-delayed, $130-million smart-card payment system will be called SEPTA Key, the agency announced Thursday. Like Ben Franklin's key. Get it? But unlike Franklin's kite experiment, no lightning speed is involved with SEPTA's move away from tokens, passes and tickets. The first new subway turnstiles are in place, but widespread use of the card on subways and buses won't happen till next year, and on Regional Rail, not until 2016 at least. The new system will allow riders to use any "contactless" credit card or a SEPTA-issued card or even a smartphone to pay their fares at card-reading turnstiles or bus fare boxes.
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