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BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Move over, Sierra Club and Elvis fans. Caesars World Inc. has joined your ranks as a credit-card sponsor, the first casino company in the nation to put its name on a major piece of plastic. Since the inception of the Caesars program in Atlantic City a year and a half ago, the resort chain has enrolled more than 20,000 MasterCard holders. Credit-card users receive cash rebates and discounts to restaurants, shows and shops in the chain. Caesars World became part of a growing number of credit-card sponsors that appeal to groups of consumers with common interests.
SPORTS
February 1, 2008 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bill usually belongs to Tom Brady, because he is the quarterback and, after all, it is his responsibility. Linemen have to eat. Quarterbacks have to pay. But when the crowd swelled at a Scottsdale restaurant Tuesday night, with defensive players joining in on the offense's dinner, a good old-fashioned game of credit- card roulette determined who would pick up the tab. For offensive tackle Nick Kaczur, guard Stephen Neal and defensive lineman...
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Charles Dickens tale A Christmas Carol were updated to fit these times, Scrooge probably wouldn't bother gathering his hoard of cash to buy last-minute gifts for Tiny Tim and the others. He'd simply pull out a credit card and worry about the bill later. At least, that's how thousands of people in Scrooge's income bracket pay for their holiday purchases each year. And when it is finally time to pay the bill about 30 days or so later, bankers in South Jersey say, the credit-card customers rarely complain that they are being charged more than twice the prime interest rate on their purchases.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Advanta Corp. yesterday reported a steep decline in profit from its small-business credit cards in the first quarter, as the slumping economy caused more borrowers to fall behind in their payments. Even so, the Spring House company's class B shares jumped 16.45 percent, or $1.24, to $8.78 in Nasdaq trading yesterday because the earnings were better than expected. Advanta said its credit card operation earned $6.67 million in the first quarter, off sharply from $21.17 million in the same period a year earlier.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: First Union cuts jobs PhilEx reduces fees MBNA chief recovering Do gamblers borrow more? Casino operator Harrah's Entertainment Inc. has tapped MBNA America Bank of Wilmington to sell cards to 23 million gamblers who have registered at the company's casinos, restaurants and hotels from Atlantic City to Las Vegas, according to Harrah's spokesman Gary Thompson. Heavy users win discounts at Harrah's, Rio and Showboat casinos and casino-hotels.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
One adult and three juveniles have been charged with using a stolen Discover card to steal $1,500 worth of merchandise, Newtown Township police said. The credit card, stolen June 27 from a home in the 500 block of Atwood Court, was used from June 28 to July 3 for purchases at 14 shops in the Oxford Valley and Neshaminy Malls and the I. Goldberg outdoor clothing store in Philadelphia, investigating police Sgt. Charles Patton said. Quincy J. Connor, 18, of the Americana Terrace apartments in Morrisville, has been charged with criminal attempt and six counts each of conspiracy, theft by unlawful taking, theft of property lost, receiving stolen property and forgery.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police believe that the man who gunned down Assistant Burlington County Prosecutor Rick Barbour went shopping in Center City 12 hours after the shooting and tried to use one of Barbour's credit cards to pay for his purchase. Philadelphia homicide detectives said yesterday that the suspect was with two other men when he tried to make a purchase using Barbour's Discover card. In addition, the man showed a New Jersey ID card as a backup, with Barbour's name but his own photo pasted on. Police declined to release the name of the store.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By LAURENCE S. SEIDMAN
The Clintons have their hearts in the right place concerning health care: They want universal coverage, an end to the barrier of "a pre-existing medical condition," and a guarantee that a person's coverage "can never be taken away" by losing a job or becoming ill. Their determination is in sharp contrast to the complacency of the occupants of the White House during the preceding dozen years. But their heads have let down their hearts. They have succumbed to political advice warning them not to propose replacing private health insurance with government health insurance.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having agreed to buy Advanta Corp.'s vast but troubled credit-card business, Fleet Financial Group yesterday put one of the industry's most powerful executives in charge. Joseph W. Saunders, Household International credit-card chief, was named chairman and chief executive of Fleet's credit-card unit. The move was disclosed by Household and confirmed by Fleet yesterday, surprising senior Advanta officials who hadn't been told of the move. Saunders, 52, who is also chairman of MasterCard International's Global Board of Directors, will fill the vacuum left by the abrupt departure of Advanta chief executive Alex W. Hart and credit-card chief James Allhusen.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police arrested an unemployed Bristol Township woman Friday after an attempt was made to purchase a $3,600 motorcycle with a fraudulently obtained credit card, and said the woman was wanted for defrauding a credit card company of more than $40,000 in the last six weeks. Dawn Alvarez, 24, of Ford Road, was arrested at 1 p.m. Friday at the East Coast Kawasaki, 208 Levittown Parkway, after police were summoned by the store staff. They were alerted by AT&T MasterCard security personnel, who said the woman had been sought for credit card fraud since April 25. Tullytown Officer Robert Gunderman said police seized nine fraudulently obtained credit cards and $2,000 in cash thought to have been obtained by cash advances drawn against the fraudulent cards.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
I LIKE TO hear from readers, especially those with specific questions about financial issues. Here are five: Q: Given the increased frequency with which credit cards are being compromised, I wonder if using a secure credit card is a safer way to shop online. My reasoning is that a secured credit card requires the user to deposit money into a bank account. Because this account wouldn't be linked to my checking, it seems more secure. Should the account become compromised, the only risk is what money you've already earmarked for online shopping.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA To illustrate his point, Spencer Ackerman ordered the panel moderator to hand over her wallet, from which he then withdrew a credit card. "I'm going to make a little indentation copy of it," Ackerman, the national security editor for the Guardian newspaper, told about a hundred in the audience at the American Library Association's annual meeting at the Convention Center in Philadelphia on Saturday. "Now, I have an impression of her credit card. Have I taken something from her when I took the card or only when I use the impression to make a purchase?"
BUSINESS
January 20, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Credit-card debt can sneak up on you. If you think $20,000 in such debt is no biggie, you're wrong. If you think you'll never have to deal with that kind of number, better think again. For all but a few of those facing it, living with a credit-card debt of $20,000 or more is a major life problem. A Credit.com online survey this month found 5 percent of respondents had such debt - and a significant portion of that group thought most people were like them. The most common reason for running up such debt, the post says, is that people "don't have sufficient income to cover their expenses.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Give yourself the gift of losses. There are only six trading days left in 2013, so it's time to review your portfolio to see if there are any tax losses you can harvest. In other words, sell your portfolio's losers, use the losses to offset realized taxable gains, and lower your 2013 tax bill. Remember, you need to act by Dec. 31. Tax-loss harvesting, or selling investments such as stocks, bonds, and mutual funds that have lost value, can reduce your taxes on capital gains realized from selling winning investments.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
CAN I CONFESS? There was one time when I got into credit-card trouble, and it scared me quite a bit. I had a department-store credit card. I was just starting out as a reporter for the Baltimore Evening Sun . I wanted some nice clothes for work and a few items for my newly purchased condominium, which I bought a year out of college. I ran up $500. Today that amount may not seem like much, but for me it felt like $5,000. When I opened the statement and saw that my charges were that high, I panicked.
NEWS
November 28, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A potential stumbling block to the rapid takeoff of online gambling in New Jersey - where casino sites opened to the public Tuesday - is the refusal of many banks to allow gamblers to deposit money into online casino accounts with Visa cards. A 2006 federal law cracked down on such transactions, forcing banks to put rigorous systems in place to weed them out. Though they are legal now in New Jersey, Delaware, and Nevada, many big banks continue to snub Internet gambling. "For seven years, banks have been conditioned on the ramifications and the penalties associated with accepting illegal Internet gaming transactions," said Joseph Pappano Sr., vice president and managing director at Vantiv Inc., which is processing Visa and MasterCard transactions for online gambling in all three states.
NEWS
November 28, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Jurors in Dorothy June Brown's federal fraud trial heard Tuesday about multiple salaries paid to Brown and money she received from management firms she controlled. Brown is accused of defrauding the four charter schools she founded of $6.7 million and then conspiring with two former administrators to obstruct justice by orchestrating a cover-up. Francis L. Gizaza, an accountant who began preparing tax returns for Brown's schools in 1998, reviewed several years of nonprofit tax forms for the schools.
NEWS
November 27, 2013
The Justice Department's largest-ever civil settlement with a single company may suggest the federal government is finally getting tough with the financial institutions whose reckless practices led to the recession. But in reality the punishment may not prevent a similar catastrophe because it doesn't go far enough to sanction the responsible firms. The government settled for $13 billion from JPMorgan Chase, which was accused of knowingly selling bad mortgages to investors, including pension funds.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Right about now, foes of 2010's health-care reform are gleefully pointing to the law's rocky rollout as evidence for Ronald Reagan's famous declaration that "government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. " Even some Obamacare supporters worry it's a sign that government can't get things right. But before you fall for a notion that helps too many Americans gloss over the government's achievements - say, Social Security, Medicare, and the moon landings - you might want to consider the epiphany reported recently by University of Chicago economist Neale Mahoney.
NEWS
October 29, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
ROSCOE CAMPBELL retired from the Philadelphia Police Department 28 years ago, but he must have felt the force was still with him over the weekend when he allegedly tried to shake down a motorist for parking in a handicapped spot at an Upper Darby Wawa. Now Campbell, 79, finds himself on the dark side of the law, charged with impersonating a police officer, robbery and related offenses for the incident at the convenience store on State Road near Highland Avenue about 3 a.m. Saturday.
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