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BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Move over, Sierra Club and Elvis fans. Caesars World Inc. has joined your ranks as a credit-card sponsor, the first casino company in the nation to put its name on a major piece of plastic. Since the inception of the Caesars program in Atlantic City a year and a half ago, the resort chain has enrolled more than 20,000 MasterCard holders. Credit-card users receive cash rebates and discounts to restaurants, shows and shops in the chain. Caesars World became part of a growing number of credit-card sponsors that appeal to groups of consumers with common interests.
SPORTS
February 1, 2008 | By Ashley Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The bill usually belongs to Tom Brady, because he is the quarterback and, after all, it is his responsibility. Linemen have to eat. Quarterbacks have to pay. But when the crowd swelled at a Scottsdale restaurant Tuesday night, with defensive players joining in on the offense's dinner, a good old-fashioned game of credit- card roulette determined who would pick up the tab. For offensive tackle Nick Kaczur, guard Stephen Neal and defensive lineman...
BUSINESS
October 19, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  American Express unveiled a new effort Friday to combat credit-card fraud with a big assist - from President Obama. He announced the American Express Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program during a news conference in Washington, detailing a $10 million initiative designed to help merchants defray the cost of replacing check-out terminals with ones that will accept secure, chip-based credit cards. So-called EMV technology offers greater payment security by storing data on a chip embedded in a credit card, assuming payment terminals are equipped to read the chip.
NEWS
December 31, 1986 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Charles Dickens tale A Christmas Carol were updated to fit these times, Scrooge probably wouldn't bother gathering his hoard of cash to buy last-minute gifts for Tiny Tim and the others. He'd simply pull out a credit card and worry about the bill later. At least, that's how thousands of people in Scrooge's income bracket pay for their holiday purchases each year. And when it is finally time to pay the bill about 30 days or so later, bankers in South Jersey say, the credit-card customers rarely complain that they are being charged more than twice the prime interest rate on their purchases.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Advanta Corp. yesterday reported a steep decline in profit from its small-business credit cards in the first quarter, as the slumping economy caused more borrowers to fall behind in their payments. Even so, the Spring House company's class B shares jumped 16.45 percent, or $1.24, to $8.78 in Nasdaq trading yesterday because the earnings were better than expected. Advanta said its credit card operation earned $6.67 million in the first quarter, off sharply from $21.17 million in the same period a year earlier.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2001 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Also in this column: First Union cuts jobs PhilEx reduces fees MBNA chief recovering Do gamblers borrow more? Casino operator Harrah's Entertainment Inc. has tapped MBNA America Bank of Wilmington to sell cards to 23 million gamblers who have registered at the company's casinos, restaurants and hotels from Atlantic City to Las Vegas, according to Harrah's spokesman Gary Thompson. Heavy users win discounts at Harrah's, Rio and Showboat casinos and casino-hotels.
NEWS
July 18, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
One adult and three juveniles have been charged with using a stolen Discover card to steal $1,500 worth of merchandise, Newtown Township police said. The credit card, stolen June 27 from a home in the 500 block of Atwood Court, was used from June 28 to July 3 for purchases at 14 shops in the Oxford Valley and Neshaminy Malls and the I. Goldberg outdoor clothing store in Philadelphia, investigating police Sgt. Charles Patton said. Quincy J. Connor, 18, of the Americana Terrace apartments in Morrisville, has been charged with criminal attempt and six counts each of conspiracy, theft by unlawful taking, theft of property lost, receiving stolen property and forgery.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | By Robert J. Terry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police believe that the man who gunned down Assistant Burlington County Prosecutor Rick Barbour went shopping in Center City 12 hours after the shooting and tried to use one of Barbour's credit cards to pay for his purchase. Philadelphia homicide detectives said yesterday that the suspect was with two other men when he tried to make a purchase using Barbour's Discover card. In addition, the man showed a New Jersey ID card as a backup, with Barbour's name but his own photo pasted on. Police declined to release the name of the store.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By LAURENCE S. SEIDMAN
The Clintons have their hearts in the right place concerning health care: They want universal coverage, an end to the barrier of "a pre-existing medical condition," and a guarantee that a person's coverage "can never be taken away" by losing a job or becoming ill. Their determination is in sharp contrast to the complacency of the occupants of the White House during the preceding dozen years. But their heads have let down their hearts. They have succumbed to political advice warning them not to propose replacing private health insurance with government health insurance.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having agreed to buy Advanta Corp.'s vast but troubled credit-card business, Fleet Financial Group yesterday put one of the industry's most powerful executives in charge. Joseph W. Saunders, Household International credit-card chief, was named chairman and chief executive of Fleet's credit-card unit. The move was disclosed by Household and confirmed by Fleet yesterday, surprising senior Advanta officials who hadn't been told of the move. Saunders, 52, who is also chairman of MasterCard International's Global Board of Directors, will fill the vacuum left by the abrupt departure of Advanta chief executive Alex W. Hart and credit-card chief James Allhusen.
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BUSINESS
October 19, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
  American Express unveiled a new effort Friday to combat credit-card fraud with a big assist - from President Obama. He announced the American Express Small Merchant EMV Assistance Program during a news conference in Washington, detailing a $10 million initiative designed to help merchants defray the cost of replacing check-out terminals with ones that will accept secure, chip-based credit cards. So-called EMV technology offers greater payment security by storing data on a chip embedded in a credit card, assuming payment terminals are equipped to read the chip.
NEWS
October 10, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The treasurer of a Chester County fire company was charged Wednesday with stealing $300,000 from the station by forging checks, stealing from the firehouse safe, and manipulating bingo records. Hower Smith III, 57, allegedly stole the money from Coatesville's Westwood Fire Company between 2006 and 2012. Smith, who lives in Coatesville and was a member of the company for about 40 years, was removed from his post and came under investigation in 2012 after he charged $2,000 to a fire company credit card while on vacation in Hawaii, officials said.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
APPLE'S RELEASE of the Apple Watch and iPhone6 makes it clear that Silicon Valley's future will be directly tied to its ability to protect tech users' privacy. Securing Americans' personal information in an increasingly tech-dominated world has to be a higher priority for tech leaders and the valley's congressional and legislative delegations. Their failures up to now have left them, shall we say, exposed to the point of embarrassment. The confidence Apple executives expressed in their ability to protect customers' private information would be more believable if the whole world hadn't just seen nude photos of Jennifer Lawrence and other celebrities courtesy of hackers who broke into supposedly secure private Apple accounts.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
A FORMER longtime employee at the U.S. Department of Labor's Philadelphia office and a relative were held for trial yesterday on charges that they used credit cards to steal more than $4,100 in gasoline last year. Municipal Judge Patrick Dugan ordered Rhonda Winston, 54, and Maleek Adams, 24, to stand trial on charges of forgery, conspiracy, theft by deception and related counts after a preliminary hearing. The judge dropped a charge of possession of an instrument of crime that both defendants had faced.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Montgomery County brothers and a Philadelphia man have been charged in a scam that "duped" more than 70,000 people into buying a credit card they thought would help them buy merchandise over the Internet while improving their credit score, the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia said Friday. Blake Rubin, 30, of Huntingdon Valley, faces a prison term of up to 45 years and a $750,000 fine if convicted. Chase Rubin, 28, of Rydal, could get a maximum sentence of 65 years and a $1 million fine.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn Medicine Tuesday announced a data breach involving receipts from Penn Medicine Rittenhouse that were stolen last month from a locked office in Pennsylvania Hospital. Notifications of the theft were sent to 661 patients Monday, said Susan Phillips, a senior vice president and spokeswoman for the health system. She said no arrests have been made. There have been no instances of identity theft related to theft. Phillips said that was a "very low risk. " Many of the receipts were found on hospital grounds.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE CRINKLED brown lunch bag near Donna Kerwick's desk at the Philadelphia Parking Authority is filled with dozens of condoms. The receipt on the outside reads: "Rubbers: Small, medium, large. " The bag is stuffed in between a violin, a wheelchair and other items that, like the bag of condoms, were left behind in taxis and turned over by drivers who wanted to do the right thing. Nobody knows what the owner of the bag of condoms wanted to do. Kerwick, an analyst for the enforcement department of the PPA's Taxi and Limousine Division, headquartered at Swanson Street near Wolf in South Philly, is tasked with logging, tracking and reuniting people with items they've left behind in Philadelphia taxis.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Chester investment-fund manager Richard Gates and his twin brother, Kevin , are going to need Acela frequent-rider passes if their preemptive fight against the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission keeps up much longer. "It's my fifth trip down to D.C. in the last couple of months," Richard Gates said Monday. He runs the TFS mutual funds and other portfolios with assets totaling $2 billion with his brother and other math-genius partners. Kevin Gates served on a panel called "Mugged by the State: When Regulators and Prosecutors Bully Citizens" at the government-skeptical Cato Institute on Monday while Richard Gates was preparing for Tuesday's Senate committee hearing over whether President Obama's pick, Norman Bay , should chair the FERC board.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
I LIKE TO hear from readers, especially those with specific questions about financial issues. Here are five: Q: Given the increased frequency with which credit cards are being compromised, I wonder if using a secure credit card is a safer way to shop online. My reasoning is that a secured credit card requires the user to deposit money into a bank account. Because this account wouldn't be linked to my checking, it seems more secure. Should the account become compromised, the only risk is what money you've already earmarked for online shopping.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA To illustrate his point, Spencer Ackerman ordered the panel moderator to hand over her wallet, from which he then withdrew a credit card. "I'm going to make a little indentation copy of it," Ackerman, the national security editor for the Guardian newspaper, told about a hundred in the audience at the American Library Association's annual meeting at the Convention Center in Philadelphia on Saturday. "Now, I have an impression of her credit card. Have I taken something from her when I took the card or only when I use the impression to make a purchase?"
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