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Credit History

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NEWS
August 28, 1998 | by Lew Sichelman, For the Daily News
The first step in improving your credit score is to ask an experienced loan broker to run a credit report on you at least 90 days before you purchase a house. That way, you'll have plenty of time to examine your file and make whatever adjustments or corrections are necessary. Why a credit report instead of a credit score? Because the score is meaningless by itself. It's just a number, albeit an extremely important one. But it is based solely on what's in your credit file, so it's the credit file that you really want to study.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm a 19-year-old woman in college who still lives with my parents. I found out something several weeks ago that's bothering me, and I need advice badly. Years ago, after a robbery, my parents installed security cameras outside our house. I knew about them because they were visible. But, apparently, some were installed that I knew nothing about. I have done things while alone to help control certain feelings, and I have also walked around without much on when my parents were away and never thought anything about it. Ever since I found out, I have been freaking out. I don't want to make a big deal about it because I'm afraid if my parents didn't look at anything before, then they will now. I want to know if they have seen what I was doing.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | Marc Schogol and including reports from Inquirer wire services
WHOOPING-COUGH VACCINE Good news, parents: A promising candidate for a new, safer vaccine against whooping cough has been developed by American, Italian, and Japanese researchers. Human testing began Monday, and early results should be known in a couple of months. The current vaccine isn't used in many parts of the world, because it can cause brain damage and other nervous-system complications in children. TO THEIR CREDIT If you have a bad credit history, or no credit history, you still can get a credit card.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
YOUR CREDIT history impacts so much of your financial life. The information in your credit file - how you pay your debt - can affect your ability to get the best interest rate on a loan. It can be used to generate an insurance credit score that along with other information - driving record, claims history - can impact what you pay for auto or home insurance. It matters when renting a place to live. And you've probably heard or read that a bad credit history might cost you a job. But on this last point, some clarification is needed.
REAL_ESTATE
December 29, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Credit scores have become all-important to financial well-being - well, at least to whether someone will give you a mortgage. They reflect creditworthiness and are based on credit reports, which indicate whether you pay your bills on time. Lenders use someone's credit score to decide whether to lend that person money and at what interest rate. Credit scores also are used for screening insurance and other applications. In the heady years leading up to the collapse of the housing market, it became obvious that people with credit scores that weren't very good were being given mortgages that they would never be able to repay.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Alex Veiga, Associated Press
Next to filing for bankruptcy, nothing wrecks your chances of qualifying for a home loan like a foreclosure. And if you got out from under an oppressive mortgage through a short sale, in which the bank agreed to accept less than you owed, future lenders may look upon you just as unfavorably. This is the reality former owners of the more than four million homes lost to foreclosure in the six years since the housing bubble burst will have to confront. That's because the mortgage-lending guidelines most banks follow prohibit them from making loans to people with foreclosure or a short sale in their credit history, often for years.
NEWS
May 22, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
If you work for a company or nonprofit organization that has successfully developed a program, product or service that has resulted in better serving customers or clients, you may wish to enter the 1994 Better Business Awards competition, sponsored by the Better Business Bureau of Eastern Pennsylvania. Charities will vie for awards for best client service and most dramatic service growth. Companies will compete for honors for best consumer-relations effort and most dramatic business growth.
NEWS
October 31, 1998 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
When it came to stealing other people's identities in order to scam banks and merchants, James "Anwar" Williams ranked with the best of those thieves. That's because Williams was getting names of real people, along with addresses, social security numbers, annual income and dates of birth, from perhaps the best possible source - the IRS in Philadelphia. Williams managed this by paying nominal bribes to a longtime IRS tax examiner in 1993 and 1994. Before Shirley I. Jackson, the examiner, got caught in 1995, she had given Williams confidential personal data on as many as 50 taxpayers, according to court records.
NEWS
July 26, 2013
DEAR HARRY : I do not have a common name. Some years ago, I discovered that another guy who graduated from my college three years after me had an identical name, including the middle name. There was a credit mixup, but I straightened it out with the three main credit-reporting companies, and I froze my credit so no new accounts could be opened. All was peaceful until last month. I received a letter from a collection agency in Maryland demanding payment of a 2009 bill from a clothing store.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
DEAR HARRY: I have always tried to keep my credit score in good shape. This goes way back to when I got my first job. About six months ago, I read some articles about reviewing your credit reports at least annually. After seeing some TV ads regarding this, I decided to subscribe for credit monitoring. I did a lot of "due diligence" in determining which one to choose. For $14 a month, I went with one of the large credit-reporting agencies. A short while later (at most, three months)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
YOUR CREDIT history impacts so much of your financial life. The information in your credit file - how you pay your debt - can affect your ability to get the best interest rate on a loan. It can be used to generate an insurance credit score that along with other information - driving record, claims history - can impact what you pay for auto or home insurance. It matters when renting a place to live. And you've probably heard or read that a bad credit history might cost you a job. But on this last point, some clarification is needed.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
ACCORDING TO the most recent study from the Society for Human Resource Management, 47 percent of all prospective employers conduct a credit check on job applicants. But there is no proven relationship between credit score and work performance. One explanation for this is that events outside of our control can negatively impact our credit scores. Most of us can relate to people dealing with massive medical bills because of illness or injury, who have been laid off or had their hours reduced, or who experienced financial difficulties caused by the loss of a spouse or the full-time care required for children with special needs and elderly parents.
NEWS
November 11, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A restitution hearing for former football star Irving Fryar and his mother, Allene McGhee, who have been convicted of conspiracy in a $1.2 million mortgage fraud, has been rescheduled for December. Fryar, 53, a Pro Bowl wide receiver from Mount Holly who played for the Eagles and other teams during his 17-year NFL career, is serving a five-year sentence. McGhee, 74, is serving three years' probation. Both were convicted of conspiracy and theft by deception following a trial over the summer in Mount Holly before Superior Court Judge Jeanne T. Covert.
NEWS
September 10, 2015
OOOH, NEW YORK. If you can make it there, you can make it anywhere, that's what they say. That's a little spin on Alicia Keys' "Empire State of Mind (Part II)" and its nod to Frank Sinatra. For job seekers in the Big Apple, those words will really hit home now because, effective Sept. 3, some of them will have a better chance to make it there. Employers, except in limited situations, are no longer allowed to check credit histories. "Every New Yorker applying for a job deserves a fair shot - and we are committed to protecting the rights of our workers and making sure that every New Yorker has the opportunity to succeed," Mayor Bill de Blasio said after signing the legislation into law. The policy is being heralded nationwide as an example to follow.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm a 19-year-old woman in college who still lives with my parents. I found out something several weeks ago that's bothering me, and I need advice badly. Years ago, after a robbery, my parents installed security cameras outside our house. I knew about them because they were visible. But, apparently, some were installed that I knew nothing about. I have done things while alone to help control certain feelings, and I have also walked around without much on when my parents were away and never thought anything about it. Ever since I found out, I have been freaking out. I don't want to make a big deal about it because I'm afraid if my parents didn't look at anything before, then they will now. I want to know if they have seen what I was doing.
REAL_ESTATE
December 29, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Credit scores have become all-important to financial well-being - well, at least to whether someone will give you a mortgage. They reflect creditworthiness and are based on credit reports, which indicate whether you pay your bills on time. Lenders use someone's credit score to decide whether to lend that person money and at what interest rate. Credit scores also are used for screening insurance and other applications. In the heady years leading up to the collapse of the housing market, it became obvious that people with credit scores that weren't very good were being given mortgages that they would never be able to repay.
NEWS
December 12, 2014
IT'S HARD enough managing one's own money, but navigating through financial issues with another person can be even more frustrating. I often get questions about marriage and money during my weekly online chats. The following are answers to two recent questions. "What happens when someone with a FICO score of 800-plus marries someone with a score of 400? I anticipate getting engaged soon but am not sure where to start dealing with financial matters. I love my boyfriend, but financial management is not one of his strengths, though it is one of mine.
NEWS
September 19, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
AS THE OLD saying goes, no man's credit is as good as his money. And yet we live in a society that judges our ability to get credit - and in many cases a job, insurance and even a security clearance - based on our good credit behavior. Following a recent column about the FICO credit scoring, many readers had questions about their credit situations. * One woman wrote: "My husband and I have been married for 52 years and have lived in our house for more than 40. We paid off the mortgage decades ago. All of our credit is in his name.
NEWS
April 25, 2014
I ASKED MY grandmother to co-sign on a car when I graduated from college. Instead of a signature, what I got back was a big-time lecture from Big Mama on the dangers of co-signing. Decades later, I can feel the heat of her fury that I would ask to put her finances in jeopardy. I was reminded of her scolding - and her wisdom - while reading the latest report on student loans from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The report highlights complaints from borrowers that their private student loans, which don't have the same protections as federal loans, were being declared in default because their co-signers had died or filed for bankruptcy.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You may or may not think it's fair that your credit history could play a key role in setting your auto-insurance premiums - a long-running debate in insurance regulation, though a battle that insurers so far appear to have won. Only a handful of states - California, Massachusetts, and Hawaii - have limited credit scores' use in insurance pricing. If you pay bills promptly and have a top credit score, you likely benefit. But you suffer if you occasionally fall short, which is why groups such as the Consumer Federation of America contend that the practice discriminates against low- and middle-income drivers.
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