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Credits

NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
If every week of the year had a slogan, this week's would be: "Out with the old, in with the new. " But if you're making room for a new TV or laptop, you can't just chuck the old ones in the trash. Most electronic devices contain toxic elements like lead, mercury, silicon, and cadmium that can contaminate landfills. The plastic on the outside and the precious metals on the inside should be recycled - and might even bring in a profit for a local charity. Perhaps more important, starting Jan. 24, Pennsylvania laws will bar putting computers, monitors, laptops, keyboards, printers, or TVs in with the regular trash.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey's largest utility wants to more than double down its investment in solar power, with customers footing the bill. Public Service Electric & Gas Co., which two years ago generated headlines with its ambitious program to install solar panels atop utility poles, on Tuesday proposed to install 136 megawatts more of photovoltaic systems over the next five years and to provide loans to residential and commercial customers to develop an additional...
SPORTS
October 16, 1999 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Riverside High will have to forfeit two football victories because it used an ineligible player. The NJSIAA has penalized the Rams for using the player in a 35-0 win over Maple Shade on Sept. 25 and a 42-7 triumph over Palmyra on Oct. 2. Instead of being 3-1, the Rams are now 1-3. School officials declined to comment, saying that all questions on the matter should be directed to the NJSIAA. "The forfeits will stand," Boyd Sands, the NJSIAA executive director, said yesterday.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Beginning with those who enroll in September, students who graduate with an associate in applied science degree in high technology from Camden County College will be guaranteed admission to the junior class in the industrial technology program at Glassboro State College. John TenBrook, dean of business administration and high technology at Camden County College, said the 65 or 66 credits received by students awarded the associate's degree at Camden County College would be accepted toward a bachelor of science degree in industrial technology at Glassboro.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | By Mary Gagnier, Special to The Inquirer
Bensalem school officials said last week they were surprised by the quick and large response from teachers to plans for the first graduate-level course to be offered by the school district's Bensalem Academy. Originally, there was to be room for 23 teachers, but the course drew interest from 31 teachers in the first three days it was advertised, Assistant Superintendent David Archibald told the school board Wednesday during the monthly agenda meeting. Because of the surge of interest in the course, called "Writing Across the Curriculum With Computers," the board decided to split the course into two groups to be taught by two computer teachers.
NEWS
August 20, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy, Inquirer Staff Writer
A law signed Thursday by Gov. Christie pushed New Jersey a big step forward in the race to become the first state to erect offshore wind turbines. Legislators said the action could bring hundreds of green-energy jobs to Paulsboro, which they hope will become a hub of turbine manufacturing. Christie hopes to secure the title of first in the nation to attract developers and manufacturers associated with wind power. The law applies the same tool that helped the state become second, behind California, in solar-power.
SPORTS
July 24, 2013 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Staff Writer
THE EAGLES haven't even held their first training-camp practice yet, but thanks to the NFL, two of their rookies, Zach Ertz and Jordan Poyer, already are behind. Ertz, a second-round tight end, and Poyer, a seventh-round defensive back, are victims of one of the league's dumber rules. While the rest of the team's rookies spent most of the spring at the NovaCare Complex participating in OTAs and minicamps and familiarizing themselves with the offense and defense, Ertz and Poyer were on the West Coast finishing school and forced to learn their positional responsibilities via once-a-week Skype sessions with an assistant coach.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield High School Class of 1990 will have to meet new graduation requirements because the school board voted 6-0, with three members absent, to adopt a new policy at last week's meeting. But the new policy is not much different from the old policy, which was far tougher than that required by the state, according to Superintendent of Schools Charles McLaughlin. "Eighty-five to ninety percent of our students were already fulfilling or exceeding the requirements set forth by the state board of education," McLaughlin said after the Thursday night meeting.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Nancy M. Barnes, Special to The Inquirer
The Bensalem Township school board decided on Tuesday to establish an academy where its teachers could take graduate-level courses, but only for a probationary period of one year. Assistant Superintendent David Archibald, who serves on the staff development committee that proposed the academy in August 1988, said the probationary period would allay the board's concerns over the financial impact the Bensalem Academy for Professional Development would have. Archibald said he expected the administration to come back to the board in December with a request to run the first academy course early next year.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jonathan Jusino spent his first year out of high school as a stock clerk and sales associate at a clothing store, and found it unfulfilling. "I noticed there was no future for me in the work I was doing," he said. So Jusino enrolled at Community College of Philadelphia last fall as a first step in pursuing a teaching career. With his financial aid, it would have taken him three years to get his associate's degree. But a program introduced by the college this semester will allow him to finish in 21/2.
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