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Credits

NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Voorhees-based American Water Works has asked the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (EDA) for $164 million in tax credits to move its headquarters to Camden. The application is to be considered at Tuesday's meeting of the EDA at the Waterfront Technology Center in Camden. The EDA also will consider a request from a joint Rowan University/Rutgers-Camden board for $50 million to build a "health sciences" building in the city, according to the agenda. That building, on Broadway near Cooper Medical Center, would have classrooms, lab space and offices, and would house Rutgers-Camden's Center for Computational and Integrative Biology.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
After two straight years of rejection, a proposed apartment complex for veterans in Chester County has received the tax credits it needs to move forward. Mission First Housing Group, the project's Philadelphia-based developer, said it plans to break ground at the site of the historic Whitehall Inn in East Vincent Township late this year or early next year. Construction of the development, which is to have 48 units available for veterans attached to the refurbished inn, is expected to take about a year.
NEWS
May 17, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Pennsauken printing and packaging firm will receive $34 million in tax credits to relocate to and expand in neighboring Camden. Approved Friday morning, the deal for Contemporary Graphic Solutions is another by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to help bring economic activity to the city. The company plans to also spend about $7.5 million in capital investment and add 56 full-time positions to its current staff of 170, according to a project summary with the agency.
SPORTS
May 12, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
WHAT IS THIS academic world coming to? Tom Brady gets caught with his air compressor on so now they're going to be teaching a four-credit course on "Deflategate" at the University of New Hampshire. UNH sports law professor Michael McCann designed the course, which according to its description, will be about "the interplay between those footballs . . . and the legal, regulatory and journalistic systems governing sports. " So, got to thinking: If courses can be offered in that, why not have some Philadelphia sports officials teach a course?
NEWS
May 9, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey State Sen. Raymond J. Lesniak (D., Union) introduced a bill Thursday that would freeze corporate tax-break programs until the state could produce reports assessing how effective they have been at creating jobs and growing the local economy. Lesniak said the legislation would create more transparency surrounding the $5 billion in tax incentives that the state's Economic Development Authority (EDA) has given in recent years to companies, many of which have been awarded the credits in exchange for relocating to Camden and other struggling cities.
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
At stake is a claim to the historic origins of the musical instrument that bellows "oompah" at parades and halftime shows, and for the Philadelphia band the Roots. Who built the first sousaphone, the largest member of the tuba family, named for patriotic-music icon John Philip Sousa? For decades, the issue has been in dispute, with the choice between a music publisher in Exton, Chester County, and an instrument manufacturer in Elkhart, Ind. More than a century after the first instrument was crafted, a Harleysville pastor and a Kentucky collector have stepped into the debate, adding a previously unknown piece of information they believe helps to firmly place the sousaphone's 1890s beginnings in Pennsylvania with music publisher J.W. Pepper Co. "There's no doubt," said Dave Detwiler, a pastor at LCBC BranchCreek church in Harleysville.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marjorie Ross Traver, 90, of Mount Holly, a retired credit manager for the Burlington County Times, died Sunday, April 12, at her home. A 50-year resident of Mount Holly, Mrs. Traver died the day before her 91st birthday. Born in Pawtucket, R.I., she graduated from Cranston (R.I.) High School, and studied drawing and painting at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. In the 1950s, while raising her family in Cedar Grove, Essex County, Mrs. Traver "went to houses and interviewed people" for the public opinion polling firm founded by George Gallup, daughter Susan Skoviak said.
NEWS
April 17, 2015
DESPITE the number of exemplary schools in this city, far too many Philadelphia youth are still attending low-achieving schools. For that reason I am a proud board member of Sky Community Partners. SCP is an independently audited 501(c)(3) organization that supports expanding educational opportunities and health and wellness in underresourced communities. SCP enthusiastically supports the Opportunity Scholarship Tax Credit and Education Improvement Tax Credit programs. These programs allow businesses to divert a portion of their tax liability from the state to fund scholarships for students in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | Daily News Editorial
A PROGRAM that gives generous tax credits for donations to scholarship programs for low-income students to attend private and parochial schools may strike some as a laudatory way to equalize educational opportunities. Some might even say that the Educational Improvement Tax Credit program is a way to address the civil-rights wrongs of a public system that leaves too many poor and minority children behind, while the privileged few who can afford to send kids to more expensive private schools get an unfair leg up. One of the architects of the state-administered EITC program, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams, has made that civil-rights case in promoting it. According to a report on Philly.com's Next Mayor site, some of Williams' major campaign backers for his mayoral run are also some of the EITC program's biggest donors, with the principals of Susquehanna International Group contributing up to $21 million to EITC.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two days after Atlantic City's state-appointed emergency-management team released its first report, Moody's credit-rating agency gave the city another of its patented thumbs-downs, warning of a possible default. And Standard & Poor's said it was reviewing its rating on Atlantic City's bonds, based on the report's holding open the possibility of the city delaying debt service payments. Moody's pelted the city back in January with a six-step credit downgrade after Gov. Christie appointed Kevin Lavin, a corporate restructuring expert, and Kevyn Orr, the man who steered Detroit through its bankruptcy, to take on Atlantic City's enormous fiscal hole.
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