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NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony Caso has 15 years of experience in law enforcement, but no college degree. At 42, the East Norriton Township detective noticed that younger, better-educated officers were joining the force and his contemporaries were going back to school. Jean Cahill, 50, of Brookhaven, likes working with breast cancer patients at Delaware County Memorial Hospital as a licensed practical nurse, but where she wants to go requires a nursing degree. Mher Vartanian, 20, of Lansdale, dug "Disney College" in Orlando, where he learned management and communication skills, but hated to lose time toward his associate's degree.
NEWS
January 24, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Michele Brown, a longtime ally of Gov. Christie and chief of the state agency that has approved hundreds of millions of dollars in tax incentives for corporations in recent years, is leaving her post to head a nonprofit economic-development group. The group, Choose New Jersey, has helped pay for Christie's trade missions to Mexico and Canada in recent months, and says it will play a role in the Republican governor's trip to London in February. Since it launched after Christie took office in 2010, the group says, it has received pledges of $12 million from an array of businesses, labor groups, and educational institutions to promote economic development in New Jersey.
NEWS
January 22, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
In an era of increasingly grotesque wealth concentration and stubborn wage stagnation, shifting the federal tax burden from the middle toward the highest incomes shouldn't be as controversial as it is. Nevertheless, the proposal President Obama put forward in his State of the Union address Tuesday, which would raise taxes on investments by hundreds of billions of dollars to fund credits for families of more modest means, is the Democratic counterpoint to...
BUSINESS
January 18, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chicago resident Keith Santangelo has filed a federal lawsuit against Comcast, claiming that the company took a $50 deposit in lieu of a credit check when he signed up for Internet service but then did a credit check on him anyway. The suit claims the company's action violated the Fair Credit Reporting Act and seeks class action status. Comcast had no comment on the pending litigation. A Comcast spokeswoman says that its policy is to take a deposit, typically $50, when a person declines to allow a credit check.
NEWS
January 3, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The two uniformed police officers were walking through Camden's Liberty Park neighborhood late Wednesday afternoon when residents urgently flagged them down. A house was on fire, with children trapped inside. Sean McMahon and Aaron Roselli, officers in the Camden County Police Department, ran to the house on the 800 block of Atlantic Avenue, where neighbors were breaking windows and trying to get upstairs. "The smoke was extremely thick," McMahon said. "It was overwhelming. " A mother and her young son and daughter would ultimately be saved by officers, who helped them jump from the burning home, police said Thursday at a news conference.
REAL_ESTATE
December 29, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Credit scores have become all-important to financial well-being - well, at least to whether someone will give you a mortgage. They reflect creditworthiness and are based on credit reports, which indicate whether you pay your bills on time. Lenders use someone's credit score to decide whether to lend that person money and at what interest rate. Credit scores also are used for screening insurance and other applications. In the heady years leading up to the collapse of the housing market, it became obvious that people with credit scores that weren't very good were being given mortgages that they would never be able to repay.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
A ccording to Amy Adams (presumably a reliable source in this matter), octogenarian artist Margaret Keane had never heard of the actress when approached last year and asked, "Are you OK with Amy Adams playing you?" "She was like, 'Who's Amy Adams?' " the five-time Oscar nominee recounts with a chuckle. "But she went and did her research and watched some films, and so I ultimately got the seal of approval, which is good. " Very good. Two weeks ago, Adams made the list of best-actress nominees for a Golden Globe (in a musical or comedy)
NEWS
December 12, 2014
IT'S HARD enough managing one's own money, but navigating through financial issues with another person can be even more frustrating. I often get questions about marriage and money during my weekly online chats. The following are answers to two recent questions. "What happens when someone with a FICO score of 800-plus marries someone with a score of 400? I anticipate getting engaged soon but am not sure where to start dealing with financial matters. I love my boyfriend, but financial management is not one of his strengths, though it is one of mine.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - The New Jersey Economic Development Authority on Tuesday approved $118 million in tax incentives for Subaru of America and an additional $40 million for Cooper Health System to relocate their operations in Camden. The health system, whose Cooper University Hospital already is a major presence in the city, intends to move 353 back-office jobs from Cherry Hill and Mount Laurel to Federal Street in downtown Camden and add 19 new jobs in the city, according to the application made to the EDA. Camden Mayor Dana Redd, who attended the EDA board's meeting, said the projects would help Camden return to its former glory as an economic hub of South Jersey.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Rather than taking on the hard work of genuine tax reform, Congress plans to continue its sloppy approach to the issue by extending roughly 50 temporary tax breaks for another year. That sets up another crisis next year. It also means individuals and businesses can't keep accurate budgets because they don't know if their tax breaks will survive the next hostage-taking episode in Washington. The wind energy business, for example, is slumping because a key tax credit expired last year.
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