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NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
A ccording to Amy Adams (presumably a reliable source in this matter), octogenarian artist Margaret Keane had never heard of the actress when approached last year and asked, "Are you OK with Amy Adams playing you?" "She was like, 'Who's Amy Adams?' " the five-time Oscar nominee recounts with a chuckle. "But she went and did her research and watched some films, and so I ultimately got the seal of approval, which is good. " Very good. Two weeks ago, Adams made the list of best-actress nominees for a Golden Globe (in a musical or comedy)
NEWS
December 12, 2014
IT'S HARD enough managing one's own money, but navigating through financial issues with another person can be even more frustrating. I often get questions about marriage and money during my weekly online chats. The following are answers to two recent questions. "What happens when someone with a FICO score of 800-plus marries someone with a score of 400? I anticipate getting engaged soon but am not sure where to start dealing with financial matters. I love my boyfriend, but financial management is not one of his strengths, though it is one of mine.
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - The New Jersey Economic Development Authority on Tuesday approved $118 million in tax incentives for Subaru of America and an additional $40 million for Cooper Health System to relocate their operations in Camden. The health system, whose Cooper University Hospital already is a major presence in the city, intends to move 353 back-office jobs from Cherry Hill and Mount Laurel to Federal Street in downtown Camden and add 19 new jobs in the city, according to the application made to the EDA. Camden Mayor Dana Redd, who attended the EDA board's meeting, said the projects would help Camden return to its former glory as an economic hub of South Jersey.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Rather than taking on the hard work of genuine tax reform, Congress plans to continue its sloppy approach to the issue by extending roughly 50 temporary tax breaks for another year. That sets up another crisis next year. It also means individuals and businesses can't keep accurate budgets because they don't know if their tax breaks will survive the next hostage-taking episode in Washington. The wind energy business, for example, is slumping because a key tax credit expired last year.
NEWS
December 3, 2014
T HE PRESSURE is on this holiday season. Cashiers will be pushing store-issued credit. And for many of you, the pushiness isn't pleasant. Yet you cave. Credit.com found that 31 percent of shoppers felt store clerks "bullied" them into opening store-branded credit accounts. During the holiday shopping season, 28 percent of consumers said they succumbed and signed up. But it turns out the discounts dangled to get people to give in aren't enough to overcome the regrets they have later.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
We love to toast the Internet as an amazing engine for connection, creativity, and growth. We rarely want to dwell on its darker side - the vast cyber-badlands where ne'er-do-wells freely roam. On the Web, you can get away with nearly anything if you have the technical skills to pull it off and the wiliness to stay ahead of the law. Just ask a Nigerian prince - or one of his sorry victims. But if it's the Wild West out there, here's reason for hope. Last week, a Texas company became one of the first reined in by frontier marshals armed with new authority out of Washington - though this time, Wyatt Earp was played by the Federal Trade Commission and state officials in Texas, Illinois, and Ohio.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania got a double whammy of bad news Thursday in separate reports, one projecting a nearly $2 billion budget deficit, and another saying the state had maxed out its borrowing. The Independent Fiscal Office, in its long-term economic and budget outlook report, estimates a $1.85 billion shortfall in fiscal year 2015-16, based in large part on reliance on onetime revenue sources. "The non-recurring revenues and one-time costs savings employed in the FY 2014-15 budget contribute significantly to this deficit," said Matthew Kittel, the fiscal office's director, adding that rising pension costs also are a factor in the poor fiscal outlook.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Defense contractor Lockheed Martin will receive $107 million in tax credits to operate in Camden, the state Economic Development Authority said Monday. The company will create laboratory facilities in two downtown buildings and move about 250 jobs from the company's headquarters in Moorestown, according to the EDA. The company also has a laboratory in Cherry Hill. The company told the EDA that some of the jobs that will go to Camden are in danger of being eliminated due to increased competition in the defense industry, and that the subsidy will help save them.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, VINNY VELLA & STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
EVEN BEFORE the clues fell into place leading investigators to rescue Carlesha Freeland-Gaither, Detective James Sloan knew two things: The 22-year-old abduction victim was more clever than her captor, and she was going to make it home safely. "I won't say something if I don't believe it," Sloan said yesterday of the promise he'd made to Carlesha's mother, Keisha Gaither, early in the investigation, that she would see her daughter alive again. The first of many clues that led to Freeland-Gaither's safe return home after authorities found her in Jessup, Md., with her alleged kidnapper on Wednesday was provided by the young woman herself, police said.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Joe Dolinsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia tax preparer pleaded guilty Monday to multiple counts of tax fraud after falsifying hundreds of clients' returns. Edward J. Rorie, 50, doctored 968 returns between 2009 and 2011, seeking inflated refunds totaling $3.85 million, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. The returns claimed miscellaneous tax credits and fictitious expenses the filers were not entitled to receive, netting more than $100,000 in losses for the IRS. The credits Rorie fraudulently claimed included the First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit, the Hope Tax Credit, the Earned Income Tax Credit, education credits, child care credits, and the Recovery Act's Additional Child Care Credit.
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