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Credits

NEWS
December 28, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
On his first full day as mayor, Michael Nutter flung open City Hall's doors to thousands of Philadelphians who waited hours to shake the hand of someone they believed could become one of the city's finest mayors. By many measures, Nutter did not disappoint. After eight years of his leadership, the city has its lowest homicide rate since 1967, its highest credit rating ever from Standard & Poor's, and the rewards of a well-run government. It was frustrating to see Nutter too often choose taxation to stave off the impact of the 2008 recession, but his strategy kept the city on its feet and allowed it to hit its stride, as Center City's energy and prosperity began spilling into nearby neighborhoods.
NEWS
November 21, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput on Thursday called on Catholics to urge Gov. Wolf to release approval letters for corporate tax credits that help pay for scholarships for low-income K-8 students who will attend Catholic and private schools next fall. Chaput, who oversees the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia, said the tax credits were vital because they "assist many thousands of needy children. They do it by enabling Pennsylvania businesses to donate to qualified scholarship organizations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Attending the Accessories Council's annual ACE Awards - with its bottomless bellinis and butlered caviar hors d'oeuvres - is like spending the evening inside a luxe jewelry box lined with burgundy crushed velvet. Look, there's designer Carolina Herrera. And did you see Ivanka Trump? Oh, snap - Alexander Wang (I just love his hair). And, clutch my Judith Leiber, there is actress Taraji P. Henson, better known as Cookie Lyon on Fox's hit TV series Empire , clutching a Judith Leiber.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pilot program to expand federal financial aid to high school students taking college courses will make college more affordable and accessible for low-income students, local community college officials said. The U.S. Department of Education announced Friday that it would put up to $20 million in the Pell Grant program for up to 10,000 high school "dual enrollment" students in the 2016-17 school year. High school enrollment in specialized programs has fallen at some local colleges as costs have gone up. Pell grants would essentially subsidize those credits for low-income students, potentially boosting the number of high school students who take the college courses and then pursue college degrees.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peco Energy Co. and its parent company, Exelon Corp., have arranged credit lines totaling $41.8 million with nine minority and community-owned banks located in Peco's service area, part of a broader Exelon effort to secure a more diverse supply for $123 million in credit lines. United Bank of Philadelphia served as a lead arranger for Peco's $34 million credit facility, of which the nine local banks contributed $19.8 million, said Ben Armstrong, a Peco spokesman. Exelon says its minority and community banking program, which is administered by JPMorgan Chase, has more than tripled in credit-facility size and quadrupled the number of participating banks since it began in 2003.
SPORTS
October 19, 2015 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Byron Maxwell often can be found sitting in front of his locker with his legs crossed in a yoga pose. Amid the hubbub of the Eagles' locker room, Maxwell finds moments to stretch. He does yoga whenever he can - when he wakes up in the morning, in the hotel room on the night before games, in the idle moments between practice and meetings. He finds classes after the workday. During his four years with the Seattle Seahawks, Maxwell spent time at a local yoga studio that partnered with the team.
SPORTS
October 5, 2015 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's called the ladder drill, but there isn't any climbing involved. In fact, the point of Cory Undlin's drill for the Eagles' defensive backs is for them to keep their feet on the ground. They start out with each foot in the middle of two ladder squares laid out on the ground. Their feet should be spread shoulder-width and they should be in their stance for press coverage. When the drill starts, the defensive backs take lateral steps back and forth, back and forth. And that's it. "All we work on doing is taking the lead step and the trail step, so when you move laterally your feet should still be in the middle of those boxes," safety Malcolm Jenkins said.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Philadelphia has given final approval to a $50 million settlement to an antitrust class action that pitted Comcast Corp. against plaintiffs' lawyers who were seeking $875 million. The pact will net customers a $15 credit on their bill or service upgrades worth $44, while plaintiffs' lawyers will get $15 million in fees and expenses. About 800,000 Philadelphia-area Comcast subscribers in Pennsylvania will benefit in late 2015 or early 2016 from the settlement. U.S. District Judge John R. Padova of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania agreed to the final settlement, which gives Comcast the green light to shell out $33.3 million for the service enhancements and distribute a $16.7 million cash fund for attorneys' fees and payout costs to subscribers who requested them.
NEWS
September 10, 2015
OOOH, NEW YORK. If you can make it there, you can make it anywhere, that's what they say. That's a little spin on Alicia Keys' "Empire State of Mind (Part II)" and its nod to Frank Sinatra. For job seekers in the Big Apple, those words will really hit home now because, effective Sept. 3, some of them will have a better chance to make it there. Employers, except in limited situations, are no longer allowed to check credit histories. "Every New Yorker applying for a job deserves a fair shot - and we are committed to protecting the rights of our workers and making sure that every New Yorker has the opportunity to succeed," Mayor Bill de Blasio said after signing the legislation into law. The policy is being heralded nationwide as an example to follow.
NEWS
September 4, 2015
I HAVE FRIENDS who cannot watch horror movies alone. One in particular keeps every light on in the house and packs her living room with warm bodies before she will even roll the credits on "The Exorcist" (and actually, the credits are the scariest part with that maniacal bells music). I have other friends who love "The Walking Dead" but shield their eyes at some of the gorier parts, which is every part between the commercials. I do not understand the fear that overtakes these people, who are otherwise upstanding, mature members of society.
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