CollectionsCrestor
IN THE NEWS

Crestor

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 24, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Researchers reported yesterday that more people suffered serious side effects from the cholesterol drug Crestor than from other drugs, and recommended that millions of people use it only as a last resort. The Tufts University study contradicted findings by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and will not help Crestor's maker, AstraZeneca P.L.C. - with U.S. operations in Wilmington - build Crestor into the blockbuster product it has intended. Crestor was the first cholesterol-lowering drug in a class known as statins to be introduced since Baycol was withdrawn in 2001 because of muscle problems called rhabdomyolysis.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Linda A. Johnson
Drugmaker AstraZeneca PLC's big gamble, an attempt to prove its top-selling drug works better than rival cholesterol blockbuster Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A study meant to show AstraZeneca's cholesterol drug Crestor prevents plaque buildup in heart arteries better than Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. Two generic versions of Lipitor, the world's top-selling drug for several years, are expected to hit the U.S. market on Nov. 30. Analysts wrote Friday that the study result will make it hard for the British drugmaker to argue patients would fare better on its Crestor than on much-cheaper generic versions of Lipitor.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2010 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Delaware turned down attempts by Israeli-owned Teva Pharmaceuticals USA , of North Wales, and seven other makers of generic drugs to break Anglo-Swedish drugmaker AstraZeneca P.L.C.'s patent on the anticholesterol drug Crestor . AstraZeneca said the ruling by federal Judge Joseph J. Farnan Jr. would stop the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from approving knockoffs of Crestor before the patent expires in 2016. The company employs about 4,000 at its U.S. headquarters in Fairfax, Del. This is bad news for makers of cheap drugs and bargain-hunting, fat-afflicted consumers, but good news for AstraZeneca as it struggles to keep sales high before its most popular drugs face price competition.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The consumer group Public Citizen asked U.S. regulators yesterday for a criminal investigation of AstraZeneca P.L.C., alleging the drugmaker delayed reporting 23 cases of serious side effects in people taking its cholesterol-lowering medicine, Crestor. The advocacy group founded by Ralph Nader wants the Food and Drug Administration to remove Crestor from the market, contending the drug has been linked to kidney failure and potentially life-threatening muscle damage. Sidney M. Wolfe, director of Public Citizen's Health Research Group, said, in a letter to the FDA, AstraZeneca delayed reporting 19 cases of muscle weakening, or rhabdomyolysis, and four incidents of kidney damage.
BUSINESS
March 15, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Administration said yesterday that the cholesterol drug Crestor is just as safe as other drugs in its class if used correctly, formally rebuffing a consumer recall drive and an FDA whistle-blower. However, several equity analysts expressed doubt that the FDA ruling would enable Crestor to reach the 20 percent market share its maker, AstraZeneca P.L.C., has sought. The drug is prescribed to just 4 percent of cholesterol-drug users after three years on the market.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2011 | By Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press
Drugmaker AstraZeneca P.L.C.'s big gamble, an attempt to prove that its top-selling drug works better than rival cholesterol blockbuster Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A study meant to show AstraZeneca's cholesterol drug Crestor prevents plaque buildup in heart arteries better than Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. AstraZeneca released preliminary results of the study Friday. Two generic versions of Lipitor, the world's top-selling drug for several years, are expected to hit the U.S. market Nov. 30. Analysts said the results would make it hard for AstraZeneca to argue patients would fare better on its Crestor than on much-cheaper generic versions of Lipitor.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | By Susan Warner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C., the British company with U.S. headquarters in Wilmington, said yesterday it submitted a formal application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval to sell its new cholesterol medication Crestor. Analysts expect Crestor to become a blockbuster drug with annual sales of between $2 billion and $4 billion by 2005. "This clearly is potentially a star in our portfolio of products," said David R. Brennan, AstraZeneca's senior vice president of commercial operations in the United States.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2003 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C. beat analysts' earnings estimates yesterday with a 19 percent increase in third-quarter profit helped by a weaker dollar and several new medicines. AstraZeneca's earnings rose for the first time in five quarters, based on higher sales of its ulcer drug Nexium, which doubled in the quarter, and the introduction of new drugs Iressa for cancer and Crestor for cholesterol. The London-based drugmaker employs 5,000 at its U.S. headquarters and research complex near Wilmington.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2004 | By Linda Loyd INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C., Europe's second-largest drugmaker, said second-quarter profit increased 25 percent as the company sold more of its ulcer-treatment Nexium and its schizophrenia drug Seroquel. The London-based company said net income was $833 million, or 50 cents a share, compared with $666 million, or 39 cents a share, in the same quarter a year ago. Revenue in the second-quarter rose 19 percent to $5.29 billion. A favorable currency exchange boosted sales by 8 percent.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2005 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C., Europe's third-largest drugmaker, with U.S. operations based in Wilmington, rebounded from a tough year to post a 31 percent rise in first-quarter profit, it said yesterday. The London company raised worldwide sales by 13 percent, to $5.74 billion, led by top-selling heartburn drug Nexium. It held marketing, sales, administration and research costs essentially flat. "This excellent start to the year has set us on track to deliver our financial targets for the year," said Sir Tom McKillop, the chief executive officer who delayed retirement following last year's setbacks on the cancer treatment Iressa, cholesterol drug Crestor, and blood-thinner Exanta.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By David Becker, For The Inquirer
If you have a chronic medical problem, you may be taking a prescription medication daily for the rest of your life. This can prove costly and often causes long-term adverse side effects. But did you know there are alternatives to medications? Though some people will need prescription drugs long-term, others may find that with their doctors' help they can reduce dosages or even get off one or more medications entirely by making simple lifestyle changes. Let's take a look at some of the most-prescribed medications, what they are designed to treat, and how to get started on a path for life with fewer or no medications.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2012
In the Region Fewer PGW terminations Philadelphia Gas Works said Friday that 7,742 of its 479,000 residential customers are without gas service after their accounts were terminated earlier in the year for failure to pay, a reduction of 781 customers from the same time a year ago. The city-owned utility reported the numbers in its annual cold weather survey that it is required to submit to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission....
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | Lisa Scottoline
My life just changed in a good way. In fact, in a great way. By gummi vitamins. Let me explain. I'm supposed to take a multivitamin, B complex, calcium, CoQ10, and Crestor. But the only thing I take is Crestor. Why? because I don't like taking pills, or I forget, and pills suck. That would be a medical term. So imagine my delight when I'm cruising the aisles in the food store, and I see a massive jug of gummi vitamins. I don't mean gummy, like my pie crust.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
AstraZeneca P.L.C. chief executive officer David Brennan said Thursday he would retire June 1 in the wake of another difficult quarter for the pharmaceutical manufacturer. Based in the United Kingdom, AstraZeneca has its U.S. headquarters in Wilmington and a plant in Newark, Del. The company has struggled lately as it tried to replace revenue, some of which has been lost as blockbuster drugs face generic competition because their patents are expiring. AstraZeneca's best-selling drugs are Crestor (cardiovascular)
NEWS
October 23, 2011
City overreacts with police at camp I'm outraged about police costs for Occupy Philadelphia (" 'Occupy Philadelphia' keeps growing as move looms," Wednesday). I'm also frustrated that some have tried to pin these costs on the people camped out at Dilworth, as if they chose for the police to come out in force. While I work full time as an educator in Kensington, I've made it out to the demonstrations regularly since they started. No one I've talked to there has thought the police overkill is necessary.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I thought the days were over when I worried about my grades, but I've been checking the mail with college-acceptance levels of anticipation. Let me explain. A few years ago, I went to my great cardiologist for a checkup, and he did a blood test that showed my cholesterol was 258, which was high. Oddly, this was about the same as my math SAT score, which was lower than low. In fact, it was downright embarrassing, and maybe half my brain is missing. Anyway, to stay on point, the cardiologist explained that cholesterol is composed of bad cholesterol, or LDL, and good cholesterol, or HDL. I remember which is which by thinking that the L stands for lousy and the H stands for you can buy green bananas.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2011 | By Linda A. Johnson, Associated Press
Drugmaker AstraZeneca P.L.C.'s big gamble, an attempt to prove that its top-selling drug works better than rival cholesterol blockbuster Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A study meant to show AstraZeneca's cholesterol drug Crestor prevents plaque buildup in heart arteries better than Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. AstraZeneca released preliminary results of the study Friday. Two generic versions of Lipitor, the world's top-selling drug for several years, are expected to hit the U.S. market Nov. 30. Analysts said the results would make it hard for AstraZeneca to argue patients would fare better on its Crestor than on much-cheaper generic versions of Lipitor.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Linda A. Johnson
Drugmaker AstraZeneca PLC's big gamble, an attempt to prove its top-selling drug works better than rival cholesterol blockbuster Lipitor, appears to have backfired. A study meant to show AstraZeneca's cholesterol drug Crestor prevents plaque buildup in heart arteries better than Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor showed no clear advantage for Crestor. Two generic versions of Lipitor, the world's top-selling drug for several years, are expected to hit the U.S. market on Nov. 30. Analysts wrote Friday that the study result will make it hard for the British drugmaker to argue patients would fare better on its Crestor than on much-cheaper generic versions of Lipitor.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - Anglo-Swedish drug marker AstraZeneca PLC on Thursday reported more or less unchanged profits for the second quarter as it weathered a hit to sales revenue from generic competition. AstraZeneca, whose U.S. headquarters are outside Wilmington, reported a net profit for the period of $2.11 billion, up 0.3 percent from a year earlier. Revenue in the three months ending June 30 was $8.34 billion. That was 3 percent higher on a reported basis but 2 percent lower if exchange rates were considered to have remained unchanged.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|