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NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Tom Torok, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two stories of Camden have emerged. The first comes from Gov. Christie and Camden County officials. They point to 2012 - the city's deadliest year ever - and say crime has dropped dramatically, thanks to a sweeping overhaul of policing that cut costs and added officers to the streets. The second comes from Camden residents and activists, who call comparisons with 2012 misleading. "Just because [the streets] are calmer doesn't mean the danger went away," says Angel Cordero, a community activist.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
On June 30, the Supreme Court of this country declared sodomy a crime. In one fell swoop, millions of Americans were made criminals, punishable with prison terms of up to several years. It is irrelevant to argue that this is simply a "paper" law, one that will not be enforced. The highest court in the land, subject to political pressure and the intolerance of Christian fundamentalists, has made the expression of an act of love between two consenting adults in the privacy of their bedroom a crime.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 22, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SAFETY Consider the victims A commentary about reform of the criminal justice system advocated better pay for public defenders ("Reforming the justice system," Monday). It lacked mention of or concern for the victims of crime in our city. Where are the advocates of crime victims in this discussion of reform? Those of us who are active in our neighborhoods - I am a Town Watch member - see the devastation that crime inflicts on the victim and the community. Both are violated when crime occurs, yet our leaders don't talk about the victim's rights.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Staff Writer
John Parisi had been a law-abiding citizen most of his life. He had also been a close friend of reputed mobster Nicodemo Scarfo Jr., son of the former Philadelphia organized crime boss "Little Nicky. " In 2007, Parisi's life began unraveling after his friendship with Scarfo turned into a business relationship that scammed millions from a Texas-based financial institution that was forced into bankruptcy. On Tuesday, Parisi, 54, of Atlantic City, appeared in U.S. District Court in Camden, asking for leniency from Judge Robert Kugler.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Last season, ABC proved it could outmatch FX and HBO when it came to the anthology drama, with the superb first season of American Crime . The second season premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday. Unlike HBO's True Detective , which reached dizzying heights of sublimity in its freshman year only to crash and burn in mediocrity the following season, American Crime returns with an equally powerful, compelling, and intelligent story. Created, written, and directed by Oscar-winning writer John Ridley ( 12 Years a Slave )
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | By Ellen Gray
*  AMERICAN CRIME. 10 p.m. Wednesday, 6ABC. A photograph of a high school student named Taylor Blaine (Connor Jessup, "Falling Skies"), apparently inebriated and in his underwear, finds its way into dozens of teens' smartphones in the Season 2 premiere of ABC's anthologized drama "American Crime" tomorrow night. And, ever so slowly, all hell begins to break loose. The story of one boy's public humiliation - followed by an allegation that he had been drugged and raped at a party - may seem at first like a strange follow-up to the grisly murder and sexual assault at the center of Season 1, but this season of one of network television's best shows, is, like the first, about much more than a single criminal act. Different as the stories and settings are, they're tied together by creator John Ridley's willingness to zoom in on the divisions within communities that may look homogenous from a distance.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Charles H. Ramsey sat in an office with empty walls, behind a desk with empty drawers. His bulletproof vest slumped in a chair nearby. His bags were, quite literally, packed. "I guess everything in life comes down to the last hour," he said. It was 2 p.m. on New Year's Eve. At 3, he would walk through the doors of Police Headquarters for the last time as Philadelphia's police commissioner. Ramsey, 65, was commissioner for just under eight years, brought in amid a skyrocketing murder rate and mayoral campaign promises to bring down crime in a city that seemed plagued with it. Five officers were killed in the line of duty in his first 13 months.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I was excited when I heard one of the writers of The Office had created a workplace sitcom set at a Walmart-ian bargain basement box store. It's a tantalizing idea with plenty of room for goofy fun and social satire alike. I should have known better. NBC's America Ferrera vehicle, Superstore , premiering at 8 p.m. Monday, is an unimaginative, run-of-the-mill network affair full of stock characters, flat dialogue, and too many poop references. It's one of two new and very different shows next week.
NEWS
December 18, 2015
The Staircase : A French mini-series about novelist Michael Peterson, accused of murdering his wife. The Paradise Lost trilogy: Three teenagers are convicted of murdering three 8-year-old boys. Dear Zachary : A moving story about the death of director Kurt Kuenne's friend, with a tragic twist. The Jinx: HBO's series was buzzworthy for a reason. The Thin Blue Line : Recommended for any true-crime fan.     - Molly Eichel  
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Sarah Koenig, host of the mega-popular podcast Serial , has this infuriating habit of ending each episode with a cliffhanger or piece of information that changes everything. (It's infuriating because it means I have to wait to hear what happens next.) In the first episode of Serial 's second season - the second ep comes out today - about controversial Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Koenig ends by calling up the Taliban. They answer - and the episode ends. C'mon, Koenig! Not fair! Making a Murderer , Netflix's 10-episode true-crime documentary series, has cliffhangers, too, but this time, we have the benefit of binge watching.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
A year ago, the 16-story Queen Lane Apartments public-housing high-rise came down in a giant cloud of dust. On Tuesday, the new Queen Lane Apartments opened up amid smiles and balloons. "Our day has come," said Corliss Gray, head of the Queen Lane Resident Council. "People are going to be glad to come and live here. " About 5,000 people applied for a chance to live in one of the 55 affordable-rental units, a mix of two-story flats, walk-up apartments, and three-story townhouses at 300 W. Queen Lane in Germantown.
NEWS
December 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
People charged with first-time nonviolent felonies will get an opportunity to go to college rather than jail under a program launched Monday by Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams and Community College of Philadelphia. The "Future Forward" pilot, scheduled to begin in the spring with 10 to 15 students, is one of a growing number of alternative programs introduced by Williams to help those accused of lesser crimes turn their lives around. The program is for defendants facing trials for nonviolent felonies, such as drug sales, forgery, car theft, and commercial burglary.
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