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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Tom Torok, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two stories of Camden have emerged. The first comes from Gov. Christie and Camden County officials. They point to 2012 - the city's deadliest year ever - and say crime has dropped dramatically, thanks to a sweeping overhaul of policing that cut costs and added officers to the streets. The second comes from Camden residents and activists, who call comparisons with 2012 misleading. "Just because [the streets] are calmer doesn't mean the danger went away," says Angel Cordero, a community activist.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
On June 30, the Supreme Court of this country declared sodomy a crime. In one fell swoop, millions of Americans were made criminals, punishable with prison terms of up to several years. It is irrelevant to argue that this is simply a "paper" law, one that will not be enforced. The highest court in the land, subject to political pressure and the intolerance of Christian fundamentalists, has made the expression of an act of love between two consenting adults in the privacy of their bedroom a crime.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 19, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WHEN POPE FRANCIS hits Philly next month, I pray he misbehaves. Go rogue, pontiff. Throw caution and schedules to the wind and head to one of the city neighborhoods hardest hit by poverty and crime. Lots of people have suggested Kensington, but I'm not picky. Pontiff's choice - we have plenty of hurting people and places in Philadelphia. Hey, his holiness has gone off script before. In February, he made a detour on the way to a parish to stop at a shantytown on the outskirts of Rome.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Mark Fazlollah and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Arrests by Philadelphia police dropped by 16 percent during the first half of 2015, the biggest plunge in six years, records show. And during the same period, all crime - including violent felonies, misdemeanors, and property offenses - increased by 5 percent, according to the latest data posted on the Police Department's website. Through June, police recorded 5,661 fewer arrests than they did in the first half of last year. Police made 34,786 arrests during the first six months of 2014; this year, 29,125.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
YOU COULD BE forgiven for thinking Philadelphia's biggest problems have been limited recently to pope fences, a dismembered traveling robot and Chip Kelly's roster moves. Violent-crime numbers - a quality-of-life measurement temporarily forgotten in the basement of the city's consciousness - have been climbing. As of Sunday night, 152 murders had been recorded - a 5 percent increase from the same point last year, when the tally stood at 141, according to police statistics. The number of Philadelphians who have been shot has risen 9 percent, hovering at 627 victims as of last Monday, compared to 572 at the same time last year.
NEWS
July 31, 2015
ISSUE | MORATORIUM Death penalty hardly tough on crime Two positives arise from the death-penalty confrontation among Gov. Wolf, District Attorney Seth Williams, and Attorney General Kathleen Kane ("Wolf calls on court to uphold his moratorium on death penalty," July 22). It keeps capital punishment under the spotlight, and it also makes it clear that many Democrats differ little from Republicans in important areas. Williams, Kane, and other tough-on-crime officials of either party seem to have given no consideration to the words of George Bernard Shaw: "It is the deed that teaches, not the name we give it. Murder and capital punishment are not opposites that cancel one another, but similars that breed their kind.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - More victims of sexual violence will be notified if their attacker moves, takes a new job, or has other changes in his or her status as part of a new partnership announced Tuesday by state law enforcement officials and victim advocates. Under Pennsylvania's Adam Walsh law that was signed into law in 2011, the State Police is responsible for notifying victims when a sexually violent offender registers with its Megan's Law unit or if the offender changes jobs or addresses.
NEWS
July 28, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
J EFFREY WALKER, the disgraced ex-cop behind one of Philly's biggest police scandals, will be sentenced for his crimes on Wednesday. But his punishment is hardly the end of a controversy that erupted about a decade ago, when attorneys first raised concerns about arrests made by the elite narcotics squad, where Walker once worked as an officer. Because, while Walker pleaded guilty and implicated his colleagues in crooked schemes to rob and beat drug dealers, those colleagues - Thomas Liciardello, Brian Reynolds, Michael Spicer, John Speiser, Perry Betts and Linwood Norman - were acquitted in May and got their jobs back earlier this month.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The deadly June 5, 2013, Salvation Army thrift store collapse gave rise to commissions, reports, lawsuits, a criminal grand jury probe, tens of thousands of pages of documents, and an ongoing debate about why only two people have been criminally charged in the deaths of six and injuries to 13. On Friday, a Philadelphia judge decided what the Sept. 29 murder trial of demolition contractor Griffin Campbell will not be: a public airing of the failures of city government and officials. "The mayor's, the chief of staff's public statements - what effect do they have . . . that's relevant to the state of mind of your client?"
NEWS
July 22, 2015
ISSUE | FORFEITURES Seize criminals' property only I join in applauding District Attorney Seth Williams for stopping his office's practice of using the commonwealth's forfeiture laws to take homes and cars from people who have never been accused, much less convicted, of a crime ("Dirty money," July 6). However, these changes do not go far enough. According to a recent American Civil Liberties Union report, Williams' office takes $1 million in cash annually from Philadelphians who have never been found guilty of a crime.
NEWS
July 10, 2015
A former employee at Plymouth Whitemarsh High School was arrested this week for having sex with a 12th grade student. Michael Evan Morse, 26, is charged with institutional sexual assault, unlawful contact with minors, and other crimes for having sex with a female student while she was under 18. Officials said Morse, who worked as an audio visual technician at the high school, had sex with the student and communicated with her via cell phone...
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even the most bare-bones renovations to a vacant house - something as simple as replacing a gaping doorway or a broken window - could have an impact on violence in Philadelphia neighborhoods, a study coauthored by University of Pennsylvania researchers has found. With two years' worth of data from the Police Department and the Department of Licenses and Inspections, the researchers looked at the rates of violent and nuisance crimes around houses where property owners replaced doors and windows to comply with a city ordinance to combat blight.
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