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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
IF CHRISTINA SANKEY had been an angel-faced toddler when she went missing, we might know by now how she wound up dead, half-naked and alone, between two parked cars in West Philly on a frigid winter morning. The city would've been galvanized by her death. Government officials would've promised to find out how she met her tragic end. Someone would've created a sidewalk memorial, and others would've led prayer vigils to honor the life that was lost. But Christina, 37, had the mentality of a 2-year-old, but not the physique.
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
MAYOR NUTTER is expected to sign an executive order tomorrow that will significantly limit collaboration between Philadelphia police and federal immigration authorities. The order is expected to preclude police from honoring detainer requests by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement except in cases where a person is convicted of a first- or second-degree felony involving violence, and only when ICE secures a warrant to support the detainer. Michael Resnick, the city's director of public safety, had testified about that pending change at a City Council hearing last month.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Philadelphia on Wednesday moved to the forefront of a national movement to protect immigrants from deportation over minor and nonviolent crimes. Amid cheers and applause by immigrant-rights groups, Mayor Nutter signed an executive order to end the city's compliance with federal agents' requests to hold arrested immigrants who otherwise would be released pending trial. Advocates at the standing-room-only ceremony at City Hall - some in tears - hailed the order as historic and "one of the most progressive anti-deportation policies" in the country.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
When he began a career in federal law enforcement, Arthur Lewis set a simple but ambitious goal. He wanted to see his photograph hang on the wall in a prominent place of honor among the hierarchy. In a journey that took nearly three decades, Lewis rose through the ranks as a trailblazer in the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. He became the first African American acting deputy administrator of the DEA during a career that took him from the gritty streets of Harlem as an undercover agent to the second in charge of the agency in Washington.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the first officers to arrive at the rowdy bar on that awful night was Detective Joseph Delaney. What he saw would haunt him for the rest of his life. "I remember walking in and the tavern being very dark," Delaney recalled in 1988, 25 years after the cold-blooded killings of two officers shocked New Jersey and the country. "My foot slipped on what I thought was spilled beer or wine. "It was blood. The blood of men whom I'd known. " When Delaney entered, the smell of gunpowder lingered in the air. It was Aug. 26, 1963.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
PATRICK KANE couldn't help himself. He had been back to the Wells Fargo Center once - more than 2 years ago - since the shot that changed his life on June 9, 2010, back when the place was still called the Wachovia Center. "I know it was a long time ago," Kane said. "But it feels like it was just yesterday. " Late on that warm summer night, Kane snuck a shot through Michael Leighton's pads that stretched Philadelphia's Stanley Cup drought to 35 years just 4:06 into overtime of Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals.
NEWS
March 19, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Monday that she believed leading Philadelphia Democrats ensnared in an undercover sting operation committed crimes, but that the case against them was so badly mishandled by her predecessors that it could not be prosecuted. Responding to a report in Sunday's Inquirer that five public officials, including four state legislators from Philadelphia, were captured on tape accepting cash, gifts, or money orders, Kane said she had no choice but to shut down the investigation.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
If network TV has taught us anything, it's that America's heart and soul reside in its small towns. The Andy Griffith Show , Father Knows Best , Little House on the Prairie taught us about the frontier spirit that built the nation and the moral clarity that guides it. Crime, we learned, was entirely urban, a social disease that festered in big cities. That was before Walter White took us into the New Mexico desert on AMC's Breaking Bad ; before Raylan Givens, the Stetson-sporting lawman on FX's Justified , gave us a tour of the Kentucky trailer parks where prostitutes and gun dealers ply their trade; before Detective Rustin "Rust" Cohle introduced us to a Louisiana scarred by abandoned factories and polluted waterways in HBO's stunning masterwork True Detective . While the networks continue setting crime shows in New York and Los Angeles, cable channels have introduced a new breed of drama that puts the lie to the notion that violent crimes are fundamentally urban phenomena.
NEWS
February 23, 2014 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
NORRISTOWN The Montgomery County District Attorney's Office and two police departments are teaming to investigate sex trafficking and prostitution in hotels and motels in King of Prussia and Montgomeryville, authorities announced Friday. "Public safety and quality-of-life issues relating to the illegal commercial sex trade and human trafficking are of growing concern in Montgomery County," District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman said in a statement. The concern over sex trafficking and prostitution rings is so great, Ferman said, that she, Upper Merion Police Chief Thomas Nolan, and Montgomery Township Chief Scott Bendig took the unusual step of publicizing the operation before it starts to educate the public and hotel workers about the damage to people and communities these activities cause, and to dissuade those who might use the hotels for illegal activities.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
CLOUT TODAY explores the intersection of Philadelphia's political community and the criminal-justice system, paths that have been known to cross before. It's been a busy week. Let's run down the interesting stuff: * The Ironworkers Local 401 made news when 10 members, including business manager Joe Dougherty , were indicted on federal charges, accused of conspiring to torch and damage property when the union wasn't given jobs on construction projects. Here, the Pennsylvania Republican Party saw an opportunity.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA While serving 12 years in state prison for armed robbery and assault, Phillip Eric Weems renounced his violent past and wrote a book detailing the more enlightened path he planned to pursue upon his release. "White-collar crime is one of the most sophisticated rackets of illegal activity today," he said in his jailhouse manuscript. "Unlimited amounts of money can be made virtually overnight, and the parties involved usually face minimal and/or no consequences at all. " Weems was right about one thing.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Philadelphia grand jury unearthed plenty of blame in the 2012 Kensington blaze that killed two firefighters, but the jurors couldn't come up with a crime that fit "the tale of misdeeds we found. " In a 110-page report released Monday, the grand jury said the owners of the dilapidated Thomas W. Buck Hosiery building had allowed it to become "a firetrap. " Nahman and Michael Lichtenstein never "did anything to bring the building up to code," while an army of scrappers, squatters, and drug addicts had free rein inside the property, the grand jury said.
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