CollectionsCrime
IN THE NEWS

Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
On June 30, the Supreme Court of this country declared sodomy a crime. In one fell swoop, millions of Americans were made criminals, punishable with prison terms of up to several years. It is irrelevant to argue that this is simply a "paper" law, one that will not be enforced. The highest court in the land, subject to political pressure and the intolerance of Christian fundamentalists, has made the expression of an act of love between two consenting adults in the privacy of their bedroom a crime.
NEWS
October 16, 2006
WHO CAN stop the killings in our neighborhoods? To see a crime and not report it, to know who committed the crime and not tell who did it, makes you as guilty as the one who did it. We can stop the killing, and we can get guns off the streets, all we have to do is step up and speak on what we see. Tell the police what you know and what you saw - and let the killers out there know you're not taking anymore. If the shooter knew that people were going to tell the cops just what they saw, I bet there wouldn't be that many killings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2015
ISSUE | POLICE REFORMS Citizens should know the ground rules I would add a section to the recent federal report recommending changes in procedures and training in the Police Department (" 'Significant strife,' " March 24). It would include provisions that we should educate citizens that the police volunteered to protect and serve; that if you want to commit crimes, you should be prepared to be arrested; that if you decide to resist arrest, force will be used to control you; and that if you choose to shoot at officers, they will shoot back.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Early on the morning of Sept. 28, police and emergency workers responded to a fire at the central New Jersey home of John and Joyce Sheridan, where, we now know, they found the couple in their smoke-filled bedroom with fatal stab wounds. On searching the scene, detectives found two large kitchen knives, a length of melted metal, a half-empty gas can, and a box of matches. They also allegedly found cocaine, baggies, and a scale in a car at the home, which led to the arrest of one of the Sheridans' sons that day. Even if one of the dead were not a political figure as prominent as John Sheridan - who served four Republican governors before becoming the CEO of Cooper Health System, which is chaired by Democratic power broker George Norcross - New Jersey law dictates that most of the information above should have been released immediately.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Boren and Tom Torok, Inquirer Staff Writers
Two stories of Camden have emerged. The first comes from Gov. Christie and Camden County officials. They point to 2012 - the city's deadliest year ever - and say crime has dropped dramatically, thanks to a sweeping overhaul of policing that cut costs and added officers to the streets. The second comes from Camden residents and activists, who call comparisons with 2012 misleading. "Just because [the streets] are calmer doesn't mean the danger went away," says Angel Cordero, a community activist.
NEWS
March 30, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
"SLAVERY is not an obsolete relic of the past, it is a global industry that generates $32 billion in profits through forced labor and the bodies of tens of millions of human beings each year. " This is what Ivan Cole, who sits on the board of the Life After Trauma Organization, told an audience yesterday during a conference hosted by the nonprofit at Temple University to raise awareness of the pervasiveness of human trafficking. LATO helps women recover from the trauma of human trafficking.
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
The Jinx , Andrew Jarecki's six-part HBO series about perennial murder suspect Robert Durst, is not the first time the filmmaker has told this tale. Subtitled The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst , Jarecki's TV documentary ended last Sunday with Durst's Whoa Nelly bathroom soliloquy: "What the hell did I do? Killed them all, of course. " In the preceding episodes, Jarecki, like a good prosecutor, laid out the evidence linking the peripatetic millionaire, now 71, to the 2000 slaying of Susan Berman, a friend believed to have information about the 1982 disappearance of Durst's wife, Kathie.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
TV's latest comic book crime fighter, iZombie heroine Liv Moore (Rose McIver) can't fly. She can't run faster than a speeding train and she most certainly can't stop a bullet. The latest hot young monster to join CW's growing cadre of sexy vampires, ghouls and ghosts, Liv solves the most puzzling, twisted, heinous murders entirely by her wits. And if her smarts can't quite get her there, all she has to do is eat some more brains. Attractive, clever, sarcastic Liv also happens to be a zombie.
NEWS
March 18, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Education is the most important issue to Philadelphians - more important than crime, jobs, and the economy, according to a new study by the Pew Charitable Trusts. City residents favor eliminating the School Reform Commission, want an elected school board, and "have an extremely low opinion of the performance of the public school system," according to a research study released Monday. Philadelphians were mixed on charter schools in the poll - they view them generally positively, but most back the idea of spending more money on traditional public schools rather than creating new charter schools.
NEWS
March 6, 2015
I FOUND OUT that my brother had committed suicide from my mother. It was hard, particularly when I saw how devastated and small she looked sitting on the living room couch, as if the life had been siphoned from her in one inhuman pull. But the way that I found out was nothing compared to the way she'd learned of his death about an hour before: a telephone call from a kind, but anonymous police officer who'd investigated the death. There was no gentle preparation from a family member, no call from a priest or nun, nothing but the cold news that her middle child had died by his own hand in his adopted hometown in Massachusetts.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Critics pricked up their ears two years ago when screenwriter John Ridley, riding high on the critical acclaim of 12 Years a Slave , announced he was developing a TV drama.       It would be a different kind of crime drama, he said. Ridley, who won an Oscar the following year, stayed true to his promise: American Crime , which premieres at 10 p.m. Thursday on ABC, is one of the most powerful and original dramas to grace the broadcast networks in years. If the first three episodes are any indication, it will rank with HBO's True Detective as the best TV series about crime in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
* AMERICAN CRIME. 10 p.m. Thursday, 6ABC.   TOMORROW night, ABC will try to get away with much more than murder. Moving into the time slot where Viola Davis ruled in a deliriously over-the-top, hashtag-friendly mystery that wrapped up its first season last week, is "American Crime," an 11-episode limited series that is, apparently quite deliberately, neither of those things. Created at ABC's behest by John Ridley, whose commission came before his Oscar for writing "12 Years a Slave," "American Crime" starts, as so many TV dramas do, with the discovery of a body.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|