CollectionsCrime
IN THE NEWS

Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
On June 30, the Supreme Court of this country declared sodomy a crime. In one fell swoop, millions of Americans were made criminals, punishable with prison terms of up to several years. It is irrelevant to argue that this is simply a "paper" law, one that will not be enforced. The highest court in the land, subject to political pressure and the intolerance of Christian fundamentalists, has made the expression of an act of love between two consenting adults in the privacy of their bedroom a crime.
NEWS
October 16, 2006
WHO CAN stop the killings in our neighborhoods? To see a crime and not report it, to know who committed the crime and not tell who did it, makes you as guilty as the one who did it. We can stop the killing, and we can get guns off the streets, all we have to do is step up and speak on what we see. Tell the police what you know and what you saw - and let the killers out there know you're not taking anymore. If the shooter knew that people were going to tell the cops just what they saw, I bet there wouldn't be that many killings.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Michael Boren, Staff Writer
Lawmakers in New Jersey and Pennsylvania are introducing bills to classify attacks on police officers as hate crimes, and a civil-rights group warns that such measures could aggravate day-to-day interactions between police and communities, and worsen tensions. Drivers or pedestrians who believe they were stopped for no reason and got into a heated verbal dispute with an officer, for example, could be charged with a hate crime, depending on the circumstances of the stop and the words used.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Steven Rea, MOVIE CRITIC
IT'S HARD NOT to think of Breaking Bad while watching The Infiltrator . And not just because Bryan Cranston stars in both - as Walter White, the chemistry teacher-turned-mad-meth-king in the groundbreaking series, of course, and as Robert Mazur, an undercover G-man who burrows deeply, dirtily, into the world of drug cartels and international money-laundering in Brad Furman's true-crime pic. Cranston was iconic, a walking tornado of moral crisis,...
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Lauren Feiner, STAFF WRITER
On a secluded street in South Philadelphia, an unusual duo of crime-fighters hopes to fend off night lurkers. Mural artist David Guinn and lighting designer Drew Billiau have combined their talents on "The Electric Street," an illuminated neon mural on Percy Street between Reed and Wharton, down the block from the iconic cheesesteak spots Pat's and Geno's, in an alleyway hidden by the unusual curve of the block. Low-energy flexineon LEDs bend with the curve of the paint on the 30-by-15-foot wall spanning the backs of two residences.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For businesses and health-care institutions, the threat of cyber fraud is on the rise, unleashing fierce competition among law firms and consultants seeking to advise them. Medical records are especially ripe targets because fraudsters can milk the full value of a health-insurance policy. But, for all the high-tech and legal firepower available, some experts say the best protection may be better training of employees. As the threat rises, so have the ranks of lawyers making it a specialty.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
William C. Kashatus is a historian, educator, and writer Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court, in a decision written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, affirmed the protections of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments by ruling that a suspect must be clearly informed prior to any questioning that he has the right to remain silent and that anything he says can be used against him in a court of law; that he has the right to the presence of an attorney; and...
NEWS
June 11, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A 23-year-old Camden man was convicted by a jury Tuesday of two violent attacks in 2011, one in which he killed a woman during an armed robbery and the other in which he joined in a home invasion and sexual assault. Steven Alicea was convicted of felony murder and weapons offenses in the death of Lori Breiding, 38, of Camden, who was shot during an armed robbery on the 2600 block of Cramer Street in Camden in September 2011. She died Oct. 1, 2011. A codefendant, John Gonzalez, now 21, also of Camden, was convicted by a jury in January of murder and weapons offenses in Breiding's death.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITERS
The two Philadelphia lawyers whose investigation led to the ouster of former independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr as president of Baylor University are former veteran sex-crimes prosecutors who have built a practice helping institutions respond to allegations of sexual abuse. After a 10-month probe and 65 interviews, Gina Maisto Smith and Leslie Gomez produced a damning report that said the university did not take seriously the complaints of women who had been assaulted by university football players - and even actively discouraged victims from filing complaints.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
A former staffer and longtime confidant told a federal jury Wednesday that he helped to falsify U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's campaign finance reports and steal thousands of dollars of political donations for just one reason: "The congressman asked me," Gregory Naylor said as he testified on the eighth day of Fattah's federal corruption trial. During three hours on the stand, Naylor - a political strategist whose friendship with Fattah dated back decades - delivered the most damaging testimony so far in the government's case, directly linking Fattah to schemes to cover up and pay back an illegal $1 million campaign loan, and to use cash from the congressman's campaign coffers to repay his son's college debts.
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
It was to room 103 of the Lincoln Motel that Kevin Small brought his girlfriend on a Saturday night. It was in room 103 that they fought, and room 103 that Kevin Small left to go to Wawa, police said, where he filled a coffee cup with gasoline and purchased matches. It was back in that motel room that Small flung the gasoline on Melissa Bacon-Smith, who was smoking. There, he later told police, her face caught fire. It was room 103 that Small fled as Bacon-Smith called out his name, and in that room where responders found her dead and facedown on the floor less than an hour later.
NEWS
May 22, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Mayor Kenney has proposed softening the city's stance on several so-called nuisance crimes, including, ahead of July's Democratic National Convention here, those commonly slapped on protesters. The shift, a sequel to Kenney's successful effort to decriminalize marijuana possession, would make violations that currently land on an offender's criminal record punishable by a $100 fine. His administration said the shift, introduced in legislation to City Council on Thursday, would keep 10,000 cases each year out of the criminal justice system while helping protect the city from lawsuits in the aftermath of the convention.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|