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NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, MICHAEL HINKELMAN & GLORIA CAMPISI, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
NEVER AGAIN, said the feds, and they meant it. Never again will owner Rosalind Lavin nor the managers of her four personal-care centers in Philadelphia and Media allow more than 210 residents to live in what U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan called "appalling" conditions. Never again will Lavin or her managers allow residents to lie in vomit or feces for days, unattended. Never again will Lavin or her managers serve insufficient food to residents, like a slice of bologna and a piece of cheese between bread, and call it nutritious.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As sporadic demonstrations continue against the killings of two unarmed black men by white officers last year, annual tallies showing fewer murders in a number of big cities offer a different perspective on policing. Common among cities with fewer homicides are programs targeting not only specific high-crime areas, but also individuals whose history with violence makes them more likely to be involved in a homicide, either as victim or perpetrator. Cities with fewer murders include Chicago: 407, compared with 419 in 2013; New York: 332, compared with 335; Detroit: 300, compared with 333; and Baltimore: 211, compared with 235. New York cut its murder rate to 3.95 per 100,000 residents last year.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
AW, SHUCKS! Child rape is not a capital crime. No state may execute for it. In a perfect world, all murderers, rapists, heroin-heads, etc., would be exterminated. Can you imagine? Lawful jurisprudence protecting the innocent instead of protecting the guilty and damning the innocent? Whew! Makes your head spin. M. Anthony Vare, Philadelphia
NEWS
May 16, 2008
Re "If guns are the problem, why aren't Hispanic, Asian and white males killing each other?": First, the press reports more black-on-black crimes. Second, whites are so busy leaving the border open, killing people in schools, molesting in churches, kiddie porn, meth labs, political crimes. Maybe whites are killing whites in the suburbs. There is crime everywhere. Not just blacks - whites, Asians, Hispanics. And whites who run the White House are getting whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics killed every day in a war that isn't necessary.
NEWS
June 28, 2004
The next time John Street, Ron White or any other African-American cries race when investigated by the FBI or any other agency I would ask them to read page 47 of the Daily News on Tuesday, June 22. Maryland's former police superintendent Edward Norris, a white man, was sentenced to six months in prison for misusing thousands of dollars in police funds while he was Baltimore's Police Commissioner. Please spare everyone the race card when the indictments are served and remember crime and graft knows no color.
NEWS
July 3, 2009
I AND A lot of others blame the system for these continous crimes. A suggestion: When criminals commit these horrible crimes with little or no fault of the victim, it really should be a stiff sentence. Jury duty never calls on me because I'll send the criminals to hell. Cissy Benjamin, Philadelphia
NEWS
February 27, 1994
In taking a fresh look at the allegations of womanizing and sexual misconduct by former Warminster Police Chief Elmer P. Clawges, Bucks County District Attorney Alan M. Rubenstein has added fuel to the notion that this case is too hot to handle. A few weeks back, the D.A. said the former police chief's alleged conduct in one instance was "not only criminal, it is reprehensible and it's wrong. " The case involved a former township police clerk, Julie Beekman, who said the chief had sex with her regularly, beginning when she was 16. While he said he wanted to prosecute, Mr. Rubenstein said he was "absolutely barred by the statute of limitations.
NEWS
May 23, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by April Saul
Philadelphia Interfaith Action tried yesterday to present a fiddle to Commissioner Richard Neal at Police Headquarters, saying he and mayoral chief of staff David Cohen are fiddling while the city burns. The group cited a lack of response to rising crime and police scandal.
NEWS
July 14, 1986
On June 30, the Supreme Court of this country declared sodomy a crime. In one fell swoop, millions of Americans were made criminals, punishable with prison terms of up to several years. It is irrelevant to argue that this is simply a "paper" law, one that will not be enforced. The highest court in the land, subject to political pressure and the intolerance of Christian fundamentalists, has made the expression of an act of love between two consenting adults in the privacy of their bedroom a crime.
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NEWS
January 9, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
JAMES WALSH, one of the most notorious of the "goons" in the local Ironworkers union who committed acts of violence and sabotage at nonunion-contractor sites, told a federal jury yesterday that his actions had the approval of the union's leadership. They were "endorsed, and they were appreciated by the administration of the local," Walsh, 50, testified. That administration included Joseph Dougherty, 73, the former longtime head of Ironworkers Local 401, who is on trial on racketeering conspiracy, arson and extortion charges.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As sporadic demonstrations continue against the killings of two unarmed black men by white officers last year, annual tallies showing fewer murders in a number of big cities offer a different perspective on policing. Common among cities with fewer homicides are programs targeting not only specific high-crime areas, but also individuals whose history with violence makes them more likely to be involved in a homicide, either as victim or perpetrator. Cities with fewer murders include Chicago: 407, compared with 419 in 2013; New York: 332, compared with 335; Detroit: 300, compared with 333; and Baltimore: 211, compared with 235. New York cut its murder rate to 3.95 per 100,000 residents last year.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
PHILADELPHIA ended the year with 248 murders, just one higher than in 2013, when the city saw a historic low of 247, according to crime statistics touted yesterday by Mayor Nutter. Nutter noted that the 2014 murder total represented a nearly 37 percent drop from 2007, the year before he took office, when 391 were slain. The mayor credited the decrease in murders - and a decline in shootings and violent crime overall - to the leadership of Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, the diligence of his officers and a collaboration between police and community activists to fight crime.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
WITH A mouse click, Carlesha Freeland-Gaither's blood-curdling screams echoed off the kitchen walls in the old house in Germantown the other day, as clearly as on the chilly Sunday night when a predator snatched her off the dark sidewalk outside. "I hate hearing it," said the man at the kitchen table with his laptop - a Germantown resident for two decades who lives steps from where the 22-year-old woman was abducted Nov. 2. On condition of anonymity, he spoke about the recording that his home surveillance system had caught.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
President Obama granted a presidential pardon Wednesday for a 1980s drug crime to a Bucks County woman who is now chief executive officer of a nonprofit company that operates halfway houses. Diane Mary DeBarri of Fairless Hills was pardoned for a 1984 conviction on federal charges of conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine, and distribution of methamphetamine. She was sentenced to 90 days in prison and five years' probation. DeBarri, formerly known as Diane Mary Wilhelm, is CEO and chairman of the board of the Kintock Group, which is headquartered in King of Prussia and runs facilities in New Jersey and Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 18, 2014
GUN-CONTROL zealots like Helen Ubiñas don't miss a beat when it comes to exploiting tragedy. Here's a more accurate breakdown: Of the 30,000 "deaths by gun," more than two-thirds are suicides. Not much we can do about this; if guns had any link to suicide rates, Japan would have the lowest suicide rate in the world instead of one of the highest. Of the 10,000 or so homicides by gun, the vast majority are criminal-on-criminal or likely self-defense homicides. Studies have shown consistently that at least three-fourths of homicide victims (regardless of weapon)
NEWS
December 6, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A summer jobs program for teenagers appears to cut the rate of violent crime, according to a new study by a University of Pennsylvania researcher. And not because the youths were too busy working to break the law. Those who were randomly chosen to get the eight-week positions were arrested for violent offenses 43 percent fewer times than their peers, and most of that difference occurred during the 13 months after the jobs were finished. The findings by Sara B. Heller, an assistant professor of criminology at Penn, are reported in Friday's issue of the journal Science.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Given local authorities' secrecy about the violent deaths of New Jersey political fixture John Sheridan and his wife, Joyce, the reported involvement of state investigators is reassuring. Beyond helping determine what happened to the couple - who died Sept. 28 after being found amid a deliberately set fire in their Skillman home - the Attorney General's Office should make information about the crime and the investigation available in accordance with the public's legitimate interest and state law. The Inquirer reported Wednesday that a team of investigators from the Attorney General's Office has been participating in the investigation, which is being led by the Somerset County Prosecutor's Office.
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
From his barbershop at Seventh and Bigler Streets, Darin Capo has seen all the concrete giants rise - the Wells Fargo Center in 1996, Lincoln Financial Field in 2003, Citizens Bank Park in 2004 - and worried how each would affect the neighborhood. When a customer stopped by Tuesday to say a new neighbor, a $425 million casino, had just gotten the go-ahead to move in, Capo was struck with déjà vu. But also with hope - that it would be good for business despite the mixed response from the men who sit in his barber's chair.
NEWS
November 8, 2014
ISSUE | ROADWORTHY Pothole heroes Last winter was one for the record books. The storms and prolonged cold wreaked havoc on our roads. This long-overdue letter is to thank all the local, county, and state workers who tirelessly worked this summer to repair all the roads. |James T. Dodaro, Furlong, Jamestdodaro@aol.com ISSUE | MUMIA LAW Free speech jailed I find it difficult to understand how the totally unrelated activities of someone imprisoned for years - after being convicted of a serious murder - can perpetuate the crime and cause its victims to "relive that terror over and over again" ("Legislation will help relieve trauma of crime victims," Oct. 24)
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