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Crime Prevention

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NEWS
January 19, 1995 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
I remember an episode in my life when I was a young kid on the sidewalks of New York. It was the day I climbed up a lamp post and then across its arm, where I loosened the screws that kept the outer glass in place over the electric bulb. I then watched as it went crashing to the ground. Mission accomplished, I thought as I began the descent to the sidewalk. Suddenly, a strong hand grabbed me; it was the cop on the beat. He hustled me home, half a block away, and rang the bell, and I watched in horror as my father answered the door.
NEWS
February 19, 2009 | By John M. MacDonald
Crime has always been bad for the economy. It requires taxes to pay for extra police, jail space, and court costs; it leads to medical expenses and loss of work for victims; it scares away shoppers and raises insurance premiums for local businesses; it hurts property values and depresses rents; and it forces companies to spend money on private security measures. During the current economic downturn, Philadelphia should engage in strategic crime-prevention planning as part of its effort to save public money and stimulate the economy.
NEWS
September 13, 2002 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jack G. Samuels, 75, formerly of Drexel Hill, a retired Upper Darby police detective who spearheaded the start of Town Watch crime-prevention units in Delaware County, died of cancer Wednesday at his home in Three Springs, Pa. In 1972, Mr. Samuels helped develop a plan for civilian patrols while sharing a six-pack with then-township Councilman Edward J. Truitt. Sitting in Samuels' living room, Truitt tried to convince the skeptical detective. "Don't start that nonsense, because we don't need it," Samuels said, recounting the discussion in a 1987 Inquirer article.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the sight of Officer Edward Williams' blue-and-white squad car, the pack of teenagers vanished like rabbits in the warren of fenced yards and back porches behind the 100 block of Ruscomb Street. "I wished they hadn't run away," Williams sighed as he slid out of the car. "I just wanted to talk to them. " When Williams reached the spot where the half-dozen boys and girls had been sitting, he found a freshly rolled joint of marijuana. "Those kids couldn't have been more than 13 or 14 years old," Williams said, almost to himself.
NEWS
February 4, 1986
With typical near-sighted vision Gov. Thornburgh speaks of "breaking the chain of juvenile crime" by increasing the punitive prospects for juveniles 15 years or older who are repeat offenders in violent crime. Though appropriate (not prison) punitive consequences are necessary for convicted offenders, prevention of crime would be the more suitable approach and which he does not mention at all. It has long been recognized that jails and prisons are schools for crime, not rehabilitative centers.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Mount Laurel Rotary Club is selling raffle tickets to raise money to convert a cargo van for use in crime-prevention demonstrations. The used Dodge van was donated to the township last summer by Public Service Electric & Gas Co. Mount Laurel police plan to use the vehicle to transport materials for demonstrations on crime-prevention measures, such as instructions on how to properly secure buildings against burglary. Rotary Club president Larry Chatzidakis, who is Mount Laurel's deputy mayor, said the club hoped to raise $14,000 through the sale of $25 raffle tickets.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | By Richard Berkowitz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
One wall in Francis P. Friel's office is covered with pictures of sharks, some in the midst of a feeding frenzy. Friel, the borough's public safety director and top cop, took the photographs while tracking lemon sharks in the Caribbean. "They're not that dangerous," he said, explaining that they are only about eight feet long and weigh about 350 pounds. On one excursion, Friel was bitten on the hand by a shark. He calls the small scar "a badge of honor. " His fascination with sharks offers insight into both his past and his passion for tracking danger.
NEWS
November 25, 1994 | By Paul Anderson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Remember midnight basketball? Scornful Republicans who are taking over the House of Representatives do, and they are planning to reopen this year's angry debate over federal funding for crime-prevention measures in hopes of getting rid of midnight basketball and other so-called prevention programs. The House GOP's "Contract With America" calls for a $5 billion cut in prevention programs that were included in this year's hard-won $30 billion crime bill. Republicans want to see fewer dollars for Democratic "social welfare programs" and more in flexible block grants "to the communities that have the highest crime rates," said Rep. Bill McCollum, a senior member of the House Judiciary Committee and one of three candidates running for House majority whip.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Melissa Milewski and Jeff Gelles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Police Commissioner Richard Neal was there. So were Councilwoman Joan L. Krajewski and a raft of other dignitaries. Even the mayor stopped by. So did Barney, or at least a reasonable facsimile of the much loved (and sometimes reviled) purple dinosaur. The occasion was the National Night Out, an event that is a roughly equal mix of public-awareness campaign, town-watch recruiting drive, and block party. Neal, Rendell and Barney were part of a parade through Northeast Philadelphia that was just one of dozens of such gatherings in Philadelphia, and many more around the country.
NEWS
June 20, 1996 | By Lori Montgomery, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Often-scorned crime prevention efforts aimed at disadvantaged youngsters may be far more effective than tough prison terms at keeping you safe. In a study released yesterday, researchers at the respected RAND institute found that, dollar for dollar, programs like a Ford Foundation effort in Philadelphia that encourage high-risk youth to finish school and stay out of trouble prevent five times as many crimes as stiff penalties imposed on repeat...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 2012
By Jerry Ratcliffe The recent increase in seemingly random violence across Philadelphia has many commentators calling for action - in some cases drastic and misguided action (including one call for a response by the National Guard). The city's residents are right to be concerned, but this is not the time for knee-jerk reactions and short-term crackdowns. This is the time for a discussion about policing, crime prevention, and the city's dysfunctional criminal justice system. Violent crimes are committed for a variety of reasons; money, sex, status, thrills, and anger all contribute to the death toll.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
This year began bloody and deadly, 20 murders by Martin Luther King Day, only 16 days into 2012. Along with improving education, crime reduction is one of Mayor Nutter's core missions for his second term. "When those spikes hit, we're going to acknowledge, 'Yep, we have a problem.' We're not going to walk away from the people. We can't be dissuaded that when crime spikes it will remain that way," said Deputy Mayor for Public Safety Everett Gillison, Nutter's point man on crime.
SPORTS
May 29, 2011 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
Sunday is Day 75 of the NFL lockout. If you don't care or you forgot about it because you're having fun Down the Shore or you're busy living life, that apparently makes you a terrible person. It might even mean you're anti-American or a terrorist or a thug looking to rob an unsuspecting rube. You might think that's madness. I think it's madness, too. There are people, however, who evidently believe it, and some of them have even managed to say it on camera with a straight face or write it down without adding, Nah, just kidding, that's madness.
NEWS
September 22, 2010 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing between an art gallery and a fledgling restaurant, a new storefront has come to Northern Liberties - the district attorney's first crime-fighting office. The city's chief prosecutor, Seth Williams, unveiled it Tuesday to a small crowd at the Piazza at Schmidts. Inside the Community Action Center, one of several Williams hopes to open, prosecutors and police officers will work with residents to dampen crime before it can explode. "Government can't solve all the problems," said Williams, standing by a door draped with yellow ribbon along with Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, City Councilman Frank DiCicco, and developer Bart Blatstein.
NEWS
April 28, 2010 | By Matt Katz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly 99 percent of the Camden police budget is devoted to salaries, leaving little left over for the tools of the law-enforcement trade. So Mayor Dana L. Redd and Police Chief Scott Thomson joined several Camden business leaders Tuesday to announce an initiative that allows individuals and companies to make tax-deductible contributions to the Police Department. The new nonprofit Camden Police Foundation, online at camdenpolicefoundation.org and begun with more than $50,000 in donations from a handful of companies, is similar to educational foundations, which have raised money for school districts for years.
NEWS
February 19, 2009 | By John M. MacDonald
Crime has always been bad for the economy. It requires taxes to pay for extra police, jail space, and court costs; it leads to medical expenses and loss of work for victims; it scares away shoppers and raises insurance premiums for local businesses; it hurts property values and depresses rents; and it forces companies to spend money on private security measures. During the current economic downturn, Philadelphia should engage in strategic crime-prevention planning as part of its effort to save public money and stimulate the economy.
NEWS
September 11, 2007 | By LAURA BEITMAN
I'M A WALKER. I've walked from Manayunk to the Art Museum, the length of South Street river to river, and from 49th Street in West Philly to City Hall. I walk because I don't like waiting for the bus, because I don't always feel like paying for a cab, and because I like the rhythm and the air. Mostly, I walk because I like to observe the world. I like to see. Being able to walk around is one of the reasons I love Philadelphia, why I decided I could live here three years ago when walking my sister's dog, and why I prefer it over Baltimore and the other places I've been.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Leon A. King
Our jails are full, and the social and economic cost of incarceration is enormous. The Pennsylvania General Assembly is now considering Gov. Rendell's proposed budget, which includes a $75 million investment in prekindergarten for 11,000 at-risk children 3 and 4 years of age. Funding would be awarded through competitive grants to high-quality preschool programs in school districts, Head Start, child-care centers, and nursery schools. Programs throughout the state would be eligible to apply, with priority to those serving children at risk of educational failure.
NEWS
February 27, 2005 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Camden, a crime-infused city where a violent drug trade props up the economy of many impoverished neighborhoods, a special subset of criminal exists. State Attorney General Peter C. Harvey calls them the hard-core "knuckleheads" and places their number around 175. They are the young men deeply embedded in the drug culture, and they drive much of the city's crime while spinning through the court's revolving door. And they are just as likely to commit a murder as they are to die a violent death.
NEWS
December 26, 2004 | By Wendy Walker INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Widener University's new program in Exton for senior citizens was the brainchild of Ida Snyder, 91. Snyder, of Paoli, approached the university earlier this year with an idea to relieve the boredom that many seniors feel. "Not everyone over the age of 50 wants to watch television all day and play bingo twice a week," she said. She proposed offering academic courses "both attended and instructed by my peers. " Administrators at the university, whose main campus is in Chester, did some research and found a wide audience of well-educated retirees in Philadelphia's western suburbs.
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