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Crime Statistics

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NEWS
September 13, 1991 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams yesterday defended preliminary statistics indicating that major crimes in Philadelphia fell substantially during the first half of 1991. "I find it personally offensive that people would indicate there is a deliberate and concerted effort to keep crime statistics down," Williams said. "I take personal and professional exception to people who indicate there is some concerted effort to do so. If people have some information, I encourage them to bring it forward.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By Sara Robins, Special to The Inquirer
The Borough of Rutledge has such a low crime rate it doesn't even merit a percentage point on state crime statistics, according to the state. Rutledge Mayor Don McKinney told council members at this week's regular meeting that the borough has tallied only 93 criminal complaints for the entire year. The statewide average, he said, is 580 calls per 1,000 residents. "We don't even register on the scales," he said, "not that I'm complaining. " To illustrate the borough's low crime rate, McKinney read off the police report for the month of May: one theft, one domestic fight, five traffic arrests and 22 tickets for speeding and other traffic offenses.
NEWS
April 14, 1991 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Milczarek knows how to stay out of trouble in Center City. She stays underground. Every morning, she takes public transportation from her home in Fox Chase to Center City. Once there, she makes her way through the underground concourse near City Hall to her office in the Municipal Services Building, where she works as a secretary. Every afternoon, she does the trip in reverse. That way, she never has to be on the city streets she finds so threatening. "I wouldn't feel comfortable," she says, "because of the stigma of Center City.
NEWS
July 2, 1998 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
A Philadelphia police captain who had reported a drop in crime in his West Philadelphia district was transferred out of his job Friday after a police review questioned the validity of his crime statistics. Capt. Daniel Castro, 34, was moved out of the 16th District, where he had worked since October 1997, and reassigned to night work with the command inspections bureau. Through a spokeswoman, Police Commissioner John Timoney called the move an "internal matter. " Thomas Walsh, who had worked in command inspections, was named the new captain.
NEWS
August 10, 1998 | by Maureen Tkacik, Daily News Staff Writer
Persisting in an endeavor to purge the city of inaccurate crime statistics and the cops who compile them, Police Commissioner John Timoney has reassigned a veteran commander to the Command Inspections Bureau at police headquarters. For 47-year-old Capt. Gerard Levins, once the captain of a high-profile, low-crime district in the Northeast and the second captain in two months to be transferred for undercounting crimes, it means the months ahead will be spent working nights. The department has a recent history of crime-counting snafus.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writer Clea Benson contributed to this report
For the second time in less than two months, a Philadelphia police captain has been stripped of his command after department investigators questioned the accuracy of crime statistics for his district. Capt. Gerard Levins, 47, lost his post as commander of the Second Police District in Northeast Philadelphia, the department announced Friday. Tomorrow, he is to begin working nights as a commander at Police Headquarters. The transfer does not affect Levins' rank. The action by Police Commissioner John F. Timoney comes two weeks after he declared that he had no confidence in the crime statistics given him for Philadelphia for this year.
NEWS
September 4, 1998 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Responding to growing evidence that Philadelphia police have been underreporting crime, the City Controller's Office soon will begin an independent audit in an effort to determine the extent of the problem and restore public confidence in the statistics. The Controller's Office has audited aspects of police performance, such as spending on the 911 system, but it has never examined the city's overall system for counting crime. Controller Jonathan A. Saidel, who met with Police Commissioner John F. Timoney last week to discuss the audit, said yesterday that he had ordered the review because of widespread public doubt about official crime figures.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By Michael Matza, Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For the first time, the City Controller's Office is auditing police crime figures. Soon, the Police Department will begin using sting tactics on its own officers, having undercover investigators pose as crime victims to see whether police report the incidents properly. Now, the Justice Department is starting an inquiry into the fudging of crime statistics in the nation's fifth-largest city. Rarely if ever has there been so much pressure on Philadelphia police to present an accurate picture of crime.
NEWS
December 2, 2005 | By Derek Ziegler
Last month, Camden was labeled the "most dangerous city in America" for the second consecutive year, based on rankings by Morgan Quitno Press. Because the rankings were derived from 2004 Uniform Crime Reporting data given to the FBI by police departments, local officials criticized them for not reflecting improvements made in 2005. Those improvements will be factored into next year's rankings, and it is too early to tell where Camden will fall on that list. The FBI, meanwhile, cautions against using Uniform Crime Reporting data to rank cities because "they provide no insight into the many variables that mold the crime in a particular town, city, county, state, or region.
NEWS
December 11, 1998 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
So there's this cop up in the 14th District, see, and he goes to investigate the theft of a cell phone. What's he do? He calls the number. And - can you believe this? - the knucklehead answers. The cop pretends he's the owner. Tells the thief: "Hey, this phone really likes me. Will you take $50 for it?" Sure enough, the guy agrees, they meet. Bingo! An arrest. Captain Joseph Marker told that story yesterday, and the assembled brass roared. "But here's why I wanted to tell you this," Marker said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 2014
Two stories Thursday - one on a shooting in Camden, the other on crime statistics - erred in reporting the number of homicides in Camden so far this year. There have been 32 homicides in the city.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
The Philadelphia region is home to some well-respected municipal-bond-investing experts, among them David Kotok, chief investment officer of Cumberland Advisors in Vineland, N.J., and Tom Kozlik, of Janney Montgomery Scott in Center City. We checked in with them to find out the skinny on investing in munis right now, after Detroit's bankruptcy filing sounded a wake-up call across the market. In recent days, Kotok has been advancing a war of words with the Cassandra of muni bonds, Meredith Whitney, who famously appeared on 60 Minutes in 2010 predicting an avalanche of bankruptcies across American cities.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
A dramatic drop in Philadelphia's homicide rate for the first half of the year is a welcome sign that a comprehensive strategy using all three legs of the local criminal justice system is working. That doesn't mean the police, courts, and prosecutors can rest on their laurels. Rather, they must continue their good work to ensure that the success so far isn't short-lived. For the first six months of the year, there have been 115 homicides, a 38 percent drop from the same period last year and the lowest midyear total in nearly half a century.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Pennsylvania State University officials should have blown the whistle on former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky's child sexual assaults, with or without the mandate of a federal law that requires reporting any serious crime that occurs on a college campus. Had school administrators put a higher priority on complying with the Clery Act, however, they likely wouldn't be in trouble now for their gross mishandling of the Sandusky allegations. Indeed, the scathing report by former FBI Director Louis Freeh that brought down legendary coach Joe Paterno pointed to shortcomings in the university's compliance with the federal law as "a contributing factor" in failing to unmask Sandusky, who was convicted in June by a Centre County Court jury of sexually assaulting 10 boys.
NEWS
April 2, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 39-year-old man shot to death in Chester on Thursday was the city's fifth homicide victim of 2012, and another sign that Delaware County's most beleaguered community can be a dangerous place. "Your chances of being a victim of violence while living in Chester are astronomically higher than if you live in Philadelphia," said Andrew Schiller, founder of Location Inc., a data-mining firm that markets to real estate companies and that last month listed Chester as the country's second-most dangerous city.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | BY PAUL NUSSBAUM, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEGOTIATORS for SEPTA and transit police are to meet for a second straight day of bargaining Thursday, after three hours of talks Wednesday. The strike by 219 transit police enters its eighth day Thursday. Meanwhile, as negotiators met privately at the Ballard Spahr law firm that assists SEPTA in labor talks, the transit agency and its police traded accusations over the strike's effect on public safety. SEPTA challenged claims by the striking cops that crimes have increased at SEPTA stations and vehicles during the strike.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a grinding recession, reported crime in the United States continues to fall, the FBI said Monday. Violent crime was down 6 percent in 2010 - the fourth consecutive yearly decline, according to the FBI's Uniform Crime Report. Property crime dropped for the eighth year in a row, down 2.7 percent in 2010. In Pennsylvania, violent crime fell 3 percent and property crime ticked down 0.5 percent. New Jersey and Delaware reported small drops in violent crime, but increases in property crime.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
ACCORDING to crime statistics, there have been more than 128,000 murders in the U.S. since the Iraq war began in 2003. That's an average of more than 16,000 a year. In that same period, the number of our soldiers killed in Iraq: 4,454. (By comparison, the number of service members killed in the six-month naval and ground fighting during World War II at Guadalcanal - 7,100 - in one battle.) I understand that every life is precious, but when men and women voluntarily raise their hand and swear to do whatever it takes to protect this country, including dying, why does that relatively small number of deaths get more attention than the number of people whose lives were taken from them right in front of our eyes?
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - It was a dramatic scene, even for Congress: Three Peace Corps volunteers raped while serving overseas, plus the mother of a fourth who was murdered in Benin, complaining to lawmakers about one of the government's most revered agencies. Their theme was similar: The Peace Corps, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, did little to train its workers about how to avoid or deal with violent attacks. And it reacted insensitively and unhelpfully in the aftermath of the crimes, they said.
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