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Crime Victims

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NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A former executive of a Philadelphia crime-victims support group has been charged with stealing more than $15,000 in grant money and spending it on groceries, restaurant meals, gas, hotel stays, and college tuition, authorities said Wednesday. Stephanie Mayweather, 52, the former executive director of East Division Crime Victim Services, was arrested Tuesday and charged with felony theft, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office said. After being arraigned Tuesday night before a Philadelphia magistrate, Mayweather, of Mullica Hill, was released on her own recognizance.
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Mayweather, accused of stealing more than $15,000 from a Philadelphia crime-victims support group she once directed, was ordered Tuesday to stand trial on felony theft charges. Mayweather, 52, is a former executive director of East Division Crime Victim Services, headquartered in North Philadelphia until it closed last summer. A resident of Mullica Hill, she was arrested in May and charged with several counts of theft and receiving stolen property. After a preliminary hearing Tuesday, Municipal Court Judge Bradley Moss found that state prosecutors had presented sufficient evidence against Mayweather to proceed to trial.
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 30 golfers hacked their way around Ron Jaworski's Eagles' Nest Country Club in Sewell to support a charity tournament as part of the National Crime Victim's Rights Week. After the golf outing last Wednesday, more than 100 people from politics, law enforcement, medicine and business sat down to a buffet lunch and heard state Attorney General Peter N. Perretti Jr. praise the Gloucester County Victim/Witness Advocacy Program and the ordinary people who lend a helping hand to victims and witnesses who often are in need of emotional and financial help.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was going down two evenings ago as Art Benica described to a gathering how a young woman was slain last year while working as a night clerk at a motel in Virginia Beach, Va. He told how the woman had screamed, begging two robbers not to hurt her. He told how the two thugs took $230 from the cash register and then discussed who would kill her. The woman killed by a shot to the back of the head was Benica's sister-in- law, Julia Benica....
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
The latest criminal scam in South Philadelphia's Asian-American community is one of the oldest in the book: A well-dressed Asian man comes to the door. He says he's new in the neighborhood and needs directions. The victim, often Vietnamese or Korean, is sympathetic and invites the visitor inside. "If you open the door, suddenly others force themselves in," said Chinh V. Dinh, president of the Vietnamese Catholic Community in South Philadelphia, describing the scheme. "They tie up the victims, intimidate them, ransack the house and threaten to kill the victims if the robbery is reported to police.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | By PAUL DiLORENZO
A large hole remains in a spot originally designated for a criminal justice center - a symbol of indecision and confusion about how the public was supposed to be served by the building. Whether a new center is built on that spot or somewhere else, an important question remains: How will the victims of crime be accommodated? Obviously, the cost of a new center, the choice of contractors, its location and other matters are important considerations. But let us not forget that the central party in the system is the victim.
NEWS
April 21, 2012 | By Reity O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crime victims will be honored at a candlelight vigil at 6 p.m. Sunday at the Burlington County College Culinary Arts Center in Mount Holly. The event, sponsored by the office of Burlington County Prosecutor Robert D. Bernardi, marks the start of National Crime Victims' Rights Week, a weeklong recognition of victims. The public is encouraged to attend. This year's theme, "Extending the Vision: Reaching Every Victim," targets the need to expand services to all crime victims. According to national statistics from the Department of Justice, more than 50 percent of crimes are not reported each year.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Marc Freeman, Special to The Inquirer
When the man on trial for raping your daughter is seated just rows away in the courtroom, how do you stop yourself from taking the law into your own hands? If a member of your family has been killed or assaulted and the investigating police officers don't have time to answer all your questions, to whom can you turn? The answers can be found through an area agency that helps crime victims and their families overcome the trauma of being crime victims. The Network of Victim Assistance (NOVA)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 8, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, STAFF WRITER
Stephanie Mayweather, accused of stealing more than $15,000 from a Philadelphia crime-victims support group she once directed, was ordered Tuesday to stand trial on felony theft charges. Mayweather, 52, is a former executive director of East Division Crime Victim Services, headquartered in North Philadelphia until it closed last summer. A resident of Mullica Hill, she was arrested in May and charged with several counts of theft and receiving stolen property. After a preliminary hearing Tuesday, Municipal Court Judge Bradley Moss found that state prosecutors had presented sufficient evidence against Mayweather to proceed to trial.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
A former executive of a Philadelphia crime-victims support group has been charged with stealing more than $15,000 in grant money and spending it on groceries, restaurant meals, gas, hotel stays, and college tuition, authorities said Wednesday. Stephanie Mayweather, 52, the former executive director of East Division Crime Victim Services, was arrested Tuesday and charged with felony theft, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office said. After being arraigned Tuesday night before a Philadelphia magistrate, Mayweather, of Mullica Hill, was released on her own recognizance.
NEWS
January 22, 2016
ISSUE | PUBLIC SAFETY Consider the victims A commentary about reform of the criminal justice system advocated better pay for public defenders ("Reforming the justice system," Monday). It lacked mention of or concern for the victims of crime in our city. Where are the advocates of crime victims in this discussion of reform? Those of us who are active in our neighborhoods - I am a Town Watch member - see the devastation that crime inflicts on the victim and the community. Both are violated when crime occurs, yet our leaders don't talk about the victim's rights.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - More victims of sexual violence will be notified if their attacker moves, takes a new job, or has other changes in his or her status as part of a new partnership announced Tuesday by state law enforcement officials and victim advocates. Under Pennsylvania's Adam Walsh law that was signed into law in 2011, the State Police is responsible for notifying victims when a sexually violent offender registers with its Megan's Law unit or if the offender changes jobs or addresses.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
ONE MINUTE Jesus Garcia was telling the angry men not to worry: If his friend had scratched their car while they parked on a South Philly street, they would take care of the damage, no problem. The next, Garcia was on the ground, getting punched and kicked in the head until everything went black. The police came, the ambulance was called. But by then, the guys were long gone, and with only a partial Delaware plate as a clue, they were never found. Back at work the next day as chef at Lucha Cartel, a Mexican restaurant on Chestnut Street near 2nd, Garcia had a swollen face.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is seeking to overturn a new state law that allows violent-crime victims to sue offenders whose speech continues to cause them "mental anguish. " In a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Harrisburg, Abu-Jamal's lawyers said the measure - signed in October - violates the First Amendment rights of prisoners and was specifically targeted to silence him. Abu-Jamal, 60, is serving a life sentence at a state prison in Schuylkill County for the 1981 shooting death of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
November 4, 2014
ISSUE | MUMIA LAW Free speech jailed I find it difficult to understand how the unrelated activities of someone imprisoned for many years - after being convicted of a murder - can perpetuate the crime and cause its victims to "relive that terror over and over again" ("Legislation will help relieve trauma of crime victims," Oct. 24). Nor can I understand how Harrisburg lawmakers, without hearings, passed a law related to the Mumia Abu-Jamal commencement speech that allows any crime victim, without indicating any statute of limitation, "to file a civil action in court if the criminal engages in activity that perpetuates the crime.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - A day after Mumia Abu-Jamal addressed graduates of a Vermont college, a House committee advanced a bill to give the family of the police officer he was convicted of killing a way to shut him up. The bill, believed to be the first of its kind, would let crime victims or their relatives seek injunctive relief if the criminals that harmed them seek publicity from the crime in any way. Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) called it unconscionable that Abu-Jamal - serving life for the 1981 slaying of Philadelphia officer Daniel Faulkner - could get national exposure with a "taxpayer-funded rant.
NEWS
September 17, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
EPITHETS HURLED by a surly crowd. A flurry of blows rained down on two men, singled out because they love someone of the same sex. It sounds like a scene from 30 years ago in some backwater town. But it happened Thursday, police say, when two men were walking two blocks east of Rittenhouse Square to grab some late-night pizza. "I want to find the people who did this," one of the men - whose identities the Daily News is withholding at their request - said last night at his home in South Philly.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Vowing to "become the man my mother raised me to be," a Frankford man who admitted raping four women between 2007 and 2012 was sentenced Thursday to 35 to 100 years in prison by a Philadelphia judge. Matthew Jones, 30, apologized several times to his victims and promised Common Pleas Court Judge Donna Woelpper that he would rehabilitate himself and pay restitution to crime victims while working in prison. "I am truly sorry for all the hurt that I caused," Jones said as his mother, sister, grandmother, and young daughter wept in the rear of the gallery.
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