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Crime Victims

NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By ANTHONY CAMPISI
THE PROBLEM: Last month, Louis Jargow was stabbed as he was walking home from work. He doesn't completely remember what happened, but he thinks someone came up from behind, stabbed him in the side and took the iPhone he was carrying - leaving him bleeding face-down on the ground somewhere near his West Philly apartment. He managed to stumble to his girlfriend's place. She called the police. Thankfully, Jargow turned out to be OK. He was released from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania a few days later.
NEWS
December 16, 2001 | By Brendan January INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In November 1995, Blaine Rosenberg watched as Charles E. Reddish was brought into a Camden courtroom, where he was charged with strangling Rosenberg's half-sister and leaving her body in a field of weeds along Route 130 in Salem County. "He was less than six feet away from me," Rosenberg recalled, "the man who supposedly killed my kid sister. I had two choices: to jump over the bench and tackle him . . . or sit there and sob like crazy. I did that. " Linda Burkett, coordinator of the Camden County Prosecutor's Office of Victim-Witness Advocacy, sat with him then, and she would sit next to him later during Reddish's trial, which ended with his conviction in October.
NEWS
April 22, 2009 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betty Love saw her daughter in a hospital bed, bandages barely covering the 19 stab wounds on her face and body. Love wanted to kiss her, but couldn't. A cocoon of tubing kept her away. Nearly a decade has passed, but Love still pictures Kim in that hospital bed, pleading with her mother, though her lips are still. "Her eyes were glaring at me with confidence as if to say, 'Mom, fix it; you can make everything all right,' " says Love, a Gloucester County resident who retired from a purchasing job with the City of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | By Angie Cannon, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU James M. O'Neill of the Inquirer Trenton Bureau contributed to this article
Facing increased public concern with crime, 20 states have amended their constitutions to make clear that those accused of criminal behavior aren't the only ones with rights. Crime victims have rights, too, the states have declared. Now, there's a move in Congress to amend the U.S. Constitution as well. Backed by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Henry J. Hyde (R., Ill.), a constitutional amendment was introduced yesterday that would spell out rights for victims of violent crimes - such as the right to object to plea bargains or to early releases from prison.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | By Stephanie Grace, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For a few days last year, Linda Kleer's daughter Jennifer was by her side again. That's how the Mount Laurel woman felt, anyway, as she lovingly stitched a pink heart with the words Love you guys, one of 18-year-old Jennifer's favorite phrases, on a white cloth square. For although Jennifer Borgese Pheiffer had been shot to death by an abusive boyfriend two years earlier, Kleer felt as if her daughter "was right there with me" while she crafted her contribution to a memorial quilt for Burlington County residents whose lives ended much too soon.
NEWS
January 31, 2000 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Judge Donald P. Gaydos agonized when he had to sentence first-time offenders in Burlington County Superior Court. "I take no joy in sentencing you," he would say, brow furrowed, to defendants who had admitted to murder, sex crimes, drug dealing. "They are sad cases," he would say afterward. Now, after 16 years as a judge, Gaydos, 66, is retiring. He will leave the county bench Feb. 9. Those who worked with him say he will be remembered for being fair, though his empathy for first-time offenders earned him the ire of some victims.
REAL_ESTATE
February 14, 1993 | By Suzanne Gordon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Personal-safety trainer Gary Denney asked everyone in the group before him to point to someone who could be a victim of crime. Fingers pointed everywhere as the real estate agents who work for Richard A. Weidel Corp. in Bucks County each pointed to somebody else. "The men pointed to the women. The women pointed to somebody else," Denney said. "But you all should have pointed to yourselves!" They laughed apprehensively, knowing that what Denney said was true. Real estate agents, say police, personal-safety experts and even agents themselves, are a vulnerable group, escorting total strangers to houses, often driving around alone at night, and sitting alone at open houses.
NEWS
November 3, 1998 | By Karen Masterson, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A new 10 percent tax on goods sold to state prison inmates has raised $260,000 for their victims in just two months. That money was presented yesterday by the Department of Corrections to members of the Victims of Crime Compensation Board. In January, the General Assembly passed legislation creating the tax as a means to help pay for the Victims Compensation Program, which was created in 1971 to help victims and survivors defray the cost of medical care and therapy. Yesterday's presentation, at the Mid-State Correctional Facility here, was a ceremonial recognition of the new tax and the potential revenues it will bring each year.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE WASN'T a monster Corey Feldman couldn't handle in the movies. Feldman, 42, starred in a string of blockbusters and cult classics in the 1980s that Generation Xers and their siblings probably played over and over on VHS tapes until they broke. Feldman slayed vampires in "The Lost Boys," traded wisecracks with Mama Fratelli and her sons in "The Goonies," battled gremlins in "Gremlins" and shed youthful innocence in "Stand by Me. " But monsters lurked in Feldman's offscreen life, too. Adults in the Hollywood system and his own family abused him mentally and sexually, he says, at a time when he was one of the world's biggest child stars.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
On calendars and in his head, Stephen Gallo tracks the number of days that have passed since his 19-year-old daughter, Nicole, was killed by an intoxicated driver. Gallo's mother, Donna, has watched her daughter's friends graduate from college, and seen her son pass his sister's age. Life moves on. But for the Gallos, time stopped the day Rachael Jankins killed Nicole in August 2009. When the Gallos learned that Jankins, 25, was up for parole last year, they took part in a new program that lets crime victims meet privately with the state parole board and testify about the impact of the crime.
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