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Crime Wave

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NEWS
March 20, 1990 | By Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
What does it feel like to live in the midst of Philadelphia's crime wave? "That it's necessary if you are leaving town, to have someone stay in your home or watch your home," says Ned Van Dyke, co-chair of the 17th Police District Neighborhood Advisory Council. "You pay people to stay in your home if you can. "If somebody is in the house, they won't rob it (usually). " He adds, "You watch yourself coming into the house at night. If you're a woman, you don't carry a purse at night.
NEWS
October 16, 1998 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Residents of Chestnut Hill and Mount Airy were upset by the 11 1/2-to-23-month slap-on-the-wrist jail sentence imposed on Craig "Coco" Ellis for five holdups in 1996. They held meetings and wrote letters to city and state officials about the term imposed by Common Pleas Judge Gregory E. Smith. The sentence was too easy for the man they claimed had been part of a gang of men who were terrorizing their neighborhoods. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Rayford A. Means restored the people's faith in the judicial system.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Media police are continuing to investigate the daylight abduction of a young woman outside a Wawa store and two armed holdups at a hoagie shop. "We're not used to having things like this," particularly two robberies at the same store within two days, said Media Mayor Frank Daly. But Daly said he was not altogether surprised. "Drugs are all around, and there's a lot of crime associated with the drug problem," Daly said. "We've been very fortunate. " Media Police Chief Martin Wusinich said the borough had only one armed robbery in 1989 before the Dec. 19 abduction and robbery of a 20-year-old Boothwyn woman.
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 38-year-old Southwest Philadelphia man's non-violent career as a criminal ended after he escaped from a Bucks County prison last March. It was at that point, said Assistant District Attorney Seth Williams, that Ronald Costagno, of Woodland Avenue near 69th Street, became an urban terrorist. Williams said that during the next month, Costagno, who has 33 arrests and 19 convictions, shot and seriously wounded a 26-year-old woman riding on a SEPTA bus, tried to kill two cops in separate incidents, pulled a carjacking and robbed a convenience store.
NEWS
December 1, 2008
IF CITY CONTROLLER Alan Butkovitz is to be believed, marauding hordes of transit pass-wielding students are creating a crime wave on SEPTA, aided by homeless people who are occupying the train stations because SEPTA won't remove them. This is the picture he paints in a subway safety report issued last week. The only problem is, there's no evidence to back up his claim, especially his main contention: That when the school district switched from student tokens and transfers to passes allowing unlimited rides on the system, the district also gave a pass to truant students to ride SEPTA commiting crimes.
NEWS
April 9, 2008
IS THE RECENT SEPTA crime wave a transit problem, a school district problem or a city problem? Two of the three crimes in the past few weeks in which people were assaulted, one fatally, involved gangs of teenagers. This suggests that whatever the conditions of SEPTA stations - not enough police or cameras or lighting -the real problem is above ground, not below. Thousand of kids flood the stations after school. Some of them are primed for battle with their fellow citizens, using beatings as a sport.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1989 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
Armed bank robbery may grab all the headlines, but it's small potatoes compared with the quiet crime wave striking Philadelphia's financial institutions. Check fraud - every banker's nightmare - has grown into a highly organized multimillion-dollar operation that is sweeping the area, according to the Philadelphia district attorney's office. "Check fraud has always been around, but it's really taken off lately," said Bill Heiman, an assistant district attorney in the economic crimes unit.
NEWS
May 27, 1998 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
He had a loving mother and social workers who tried to help him, but nothing seemed able to stop Johnniethon Burley from hacking a path of destruction through the city streets. A judge said Burley "proceeded to rob, carjack and asssault innocent people over and over again with no regard for the victims, the law or the consequences. " That evaluation was quoted yesterday by state Superior Court Judge Patrick J. Tamilia in explaining why the appeals court decided to reject Burley's argument that he should have been tried as a juvenile when he was arrested at age 16. Tamilia said Burley, now 18, was diagnosed as being "aggressive, evasive, defensive, suspicious, hostile, and possessing assaultive tendencies.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
There has never been much crime in Cheswold, Del., population 300, a town defined by two highways. "You know, we've had our share of problems in the past," said Dorothy Dempsey, who was mayor for 12 years until a few weeks ago, talking about what has passed for major crime there. "You leave something in your front yard and forget to put it away, and it's gone the next day. " But things are changing quickly in Cheswold, and not all the criminals have their acts together yet. On Friday the hamlet five miles north of Dover had what police called a robbery at Marsteller's Market on Route 42. This is a thoroughfare that starts in Leipsic just a couple of miles from the Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, goes into Maryland and along the way serves as Cheswold's Main Street.
NEWS
January 6, 2003 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For shopkeepers in Camden, it's a terrifying cost of business: armed robbers in ski masks ordering customers to the floor and emptying the cash register. During three weeks that ended in November, there were 23 convenience-store robberies in Camden - as many as three in one day - mostly targeting Dominican-run stores. "They occur so much," said Ana Reyes, 35, a store owner who moved to Camden in 1987 from the Dominican Republic. "I am scared. What happens if they come while my children are here?"
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NEWS
May 2, 2014
As reports of colleges' failure to deal with sexual assault have drawn attention to campuses from Swarthmore to Berkeley and Penn State to Florida State, it's become clear that the problem afflicts higher education at large. The White House and others are beginning to respond accordingly. The first report of a White House task force on the issue this week noted the astonishing finding that, according to a 2007 report for the National Institute of Justice, nearly one in five female students suffers an attempted or actual sexual assault during college.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE" makes the sardonic point that exoneration rarely gets the same frenzied publicity as conviction, and takes a small step toward redress. Its documentary subjects are the five boys-turned-men (Yusef Salaam, Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana, Antron McCray) railroaded in 1989 for the beating and rape of the so-called Central Park jogger, and of course there is much shame to be conferred in this story on police and prosecutors. They buried evidence, coerced confessions, and proceeded with prosecution even when it must have been obvious to them (the DNA didn't match)
NEWS
December 9, 2011 | By Darran Simon and Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writers
New Jersey Attorney General Paula Dow came to Camden Thursday to address the crime wave that has spurred outrage in the city, and left without offering any public inkling that quick help is on its way. The state's top law enforcement officer met separately with Mayor Dana L. Redd and Camden County Prosecutor Warren W. Faulk, both of whom have said the city needs a beefed-up police presence, somehow reversing Police Department cuts. The killing of a popular bodega owner Monday night by masked gunmen - the city's 48th homicide of the year - has lent urgency to their request.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Darran Simon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hours after a bodega owner was killed during a robbery, City Council President Frank Moran called for a state of emergency to be declared in Camden to rescue the city. "We are currently a city under siege. We are under siege by criminals. We are under siege by the drug activity. And more, we're under siege by murderers," Moran said today at a news conference in front of Bernard Grocery in the Cramer Hill section, the site of Monday's homicide. The killing was the 48th homicides this year.
NEWS
October 18, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man who caused a 2008 car accident that killed Philadelphia Police Sgt. Timothy Simpson will spend 19 to 40 years in prison under a plea agreement reached Monday. William Foster, 44, of Levittown, pleaded guilty to third-degree murder and other charges in the case. He apologized to the Simpson family. "If I could give my life up for that man's life, I would," Foster said. "He was a giver. I'm a taker. " He said he prayed for the Simpson family every night. Assistant District Attorney Gail Fairman called Foster a career criminal whose actions repeatedly put others at risk.
NEWS
June 27, 2011
DETROIT - Unlike this city, Philadelphia's population is rising. Unlike Philadelphia, Detroit's business community is as galvanized and aggressively optimistic as a Disney theme park. Over the weekend, members of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists were bombarded by some biggies from the past, the Big Three automakers, and the future, Quicken Loans, which just brought 1,600 high-tech jobs to downtown - and will add an equal number in the months ahead, jobs dragged from the suburbs because its young staff wanted to be where the action is. The action is still modest, but the downtown bowl has new buildings, refurbished hotels, casinos and a Hard Rock Cafe.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Philadelphia, people pilfer peonies, hijack hydrangeas, and abduct azaleas. Victims don't usually report this dirty crime, so no one knows how common it is. But every spring, neighbors trade tales of purloined plants. "It's just irritating, because you're like, 'Really, they're going to steal plants now?' You almost can't have anything nice in front of your house because it's going to get smashed or ruined," said Tara Martello, an occupational therapist who lives in the city's Fairmount section.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Guardian Angels are heading to Camden, where about half of the police force is expected to be laid off Tuesday. The volunteer anticrime group, which recently arrived in Philadelphia's Kensington section, will "aggressively patrol" Camden beginning Sunday, its founder, Curtis Sliwa, said Thursday. About 40 leaders of the battalion plan to meet near the Walter Rand Transportation Center in downtown Camden at 11 a.m., then fan out across the city. The group hopes to maintain that presence and recruit members from the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Michel Gondry, the imaginative maker of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind , The Science of Sleep , and Be Kind Rewind , makes whimsical, rueful movies about losers who find themselves in their fantasies. Hiring this sensitive fantasist to make the superhero saga The Green Hornet is like hiring satirist John Waters to make Rambo . Hard to think of a more mystifying mismatch of filmmaker and material. Seth Rogen cowrote and costars in the movie that aims for irreverence and settles for irrelevance.
NEWS
December 23, 2010 | By Troy Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Guardian Angels have come to Kensington. With their signature red berets and their famous founder, they are bringing more eyes - and even more attention - to the search for a killer who raped and strangled three women there recently. Since Sunday, the Guardian Angels have been patrolling the neighborhood, handing out fliers, escorting women, and offering to be a conduit of information. "Our goal is to be out there several hours a day and do that as many days as we can," said Scott Gallagher, the regional commander for the all-volunteer group of anti-crime activists.
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