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NEWS
September 9, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
PUT A LID ON IT, JUDGE TELLS CAFE OWNERS Cafe ensembles that enchant tourists with romantic melodies in Venice's Piazza San Marco will have to decrescendo or pack up their instrument cases for good. A judge has given the small orchestras of the Italian piazza's four historic cafes 10 days in which to lower their volume. If not, the city will confiscate the bandstands that draw thousands of customers to the cafes' outdoor tables between April and October. Judge Sara Natto issued her order after tests showed that the music exceeded 65 decibels, the limit for daytime noise levels.
NEWS
August 5, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Security forces using armored personnel carriers prevented a weekend rally in Uzbekistan by 5,000 Tatars campaigning to return to the Crimean homeland from which they were deported 40 years ago, dissidents said yesterday. Mustafa Dzhemilyov, who has served several prison terms for his defense of Tatar rights, told Reuters by telephone from his home in Yangiyul, 25 miles south of the Uzbek capital of Tashkent, that the Tatars first tried to gather Sunday in the town's central park.
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russian Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi, the legal successor to President Boris N. Yeltsin, would likely pursue a far more conservative line in foreign affairs, economic reform and Russian internal relations if he becomes president. A much-decorated pilot in the Afghan war, Rutskoi describes himself as a patriot who favors the establishment of a "Great Russian" state. He has long attacked Yeltsin's economic reforms and has left little doubt he would like to roll back many of the changes and reinstate stronger state control over the economy.
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Klavdia Penkova didn't look like a warmonger. The 76-year-old gray-haired woman was just sitting quietly on a park bench, asking passersby to sign a petition. But her petition urged that this historic Crimean city and all the ships of the Black Sea Fleet be placed under Russian control. Here in newly independent Ukraine, those are fighting words. Nationalists in both Ukraine and Russia have made the fate of the fleet and its home port of Sevastopol volatile issues that threaten to deeply divide the two Slavic republics.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It couldn't get any worse for Malaysia Airlines, still reeling from the disappearance of Flight 370 in March, when reports came Thursday that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashed in Ukraine as it was flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. At the very least, it's a marketing nightmare - two catastrophes for an airline in 41/2 months. What passenger, going forward, will book a flight on the government-run carrier, which until this year had a reputation for high levels of service and safety?
NEWS
December 28, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN SERVICE
Getting elected, the new president might find, was the easy part. Viktor Yushchenko yesterday appeared all but sure of victory in Ukraine's presidential runoff, with 52 percent of the votes to Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych's 44 percent. Yushchenko survived a government-rigged election, months of exhausting campaigning, bitter personal attacks, crippling back pain, and an apparent assassination attempt with poison. Now he is probably days away from confirmation as president, presuming that challenges over voting irregularities in Sunday's runoff are cleared up and the results are validated.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexander Polanski, a pilot for Air Ukraine, is lucky to fly once a month. Almost all of the airline's domestic schedule has been canceled because the cost of aviation fuel has soared. Two years ago, when Ukraine got much of its oil almost for free from Russia, about 240 planes a day flew in and out of Zhulyani Airport here. Now, with Russia charging close to world-market prices for fuel, only 12 flights are scheduled daily. And only one, to the Crimean vacation spot Simfiropol, is guaranteed to fly every day. "It is the only place left for Ukrainians to take a rest," said Victor Kupchik, the deputy head for technical services at the airport.
NEWS
March 27, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Samuil Alyoshin's Theme and Variations, receiving its second American production at the Pennsylvania Stage Company, debuted in Moscow in 1979 and ran for more than a decade. That doesn't necessarily mean that it's a good play, but it does suggest that it's a pretty safe one. And so it is. Don't go burrowing in this unorthodox little love triangle for the kind of camouflaged political satire that you'll find in Yevgeny Shvartz's The Dragon, the subversive fairy tale currently being offered by the Arden Theatre Company of Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | By George F. Will
Putting, as detente demands, the best face on Soviet behavior, we can say that glasnost has glitches, as current troubles with the Tatars show. But the truth is, those troubles are only the most recent recrudescence of a perennial Soviet problem - "the nationalities question" - that sets a severe limit on the scope of glasnost. Tatar leaders recently were expelled from Moscow, where a few hundred Tatars were mounting minuscule protests, demanding that their original homeland in the Crimean peninsula be recognized as autonomous.
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BUSINESS
July 19, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
It couldn't get any worse for Malaysia Airlines, still reeling from the disappearance of Flight 370 in March, when reports came Thursday that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 crashed in Ukraine as it was flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. At the very least, it's a marketing nightmare - two catastrophes for an airline in 41/2 months. What passenger, going forward, will book a flight on the government-run carrier, which until this year had a reputation for high levels of service and safety?
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Despite Russia's Crimean landgrab and its massing of troops on the Ukrainian border, Western leaders still refuse to recognize the mind-set of Vladimir Putin. U.S. officials still hope he will negotiate a "compromise" with the Kiev government rather than engineer the dismemberment of Ukraine. Anyone who still believes this pap should be sentenced to a week of watching the gross anti-Western propaganda on Russian state TV (nearly all national media are now state-controlled), which distorts the facts on Ukraine while whipping up nationalist fervor.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It will take cool heads to deal with Vladimir Putin after he dismembers Ukraine. And that moment is coming soon. Even as President Obama welcomed the acting prime minister of Ukraine, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, to the White House, the Russian leader advanced toward annexation of Crimea. Putin continues to deny what the whole world sees - that Russian troops have invaded Crimea - while hinting that he might send forces into eastern Ukraine to "protect" ethnic Russians. It's time for Obama and European leaders to look beyond Crimea to how they can prevent Putin from making even more dangerous moves.
NEWS
July 25, 2009 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 28 days since nine orphans from Ukraine stepped off their plane in the United States, they've visited a zoo, the Liberty Bell, Cinderella, and an Iron Pig. But for 10-year-old Oleg, the best thing about his first trip to America was in the driveway of his Bucks County host family. "To tell you the truth," Oleg said through a translator, "I liked riding the bicycle. " For the last month, the young visitor from an orphanage near the Crimean peninsula has been part of a new kind of family.
NEWS
December 28, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN SERVICE
Getting elected, the new president might find, was the easy part. Viktor Yushchenko yesterday appeared all but sure of victory in Ukraine's presidential runoff, with 52 percent of the votes to Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovych's 44 percent. Yushchenko survived a government-rigged election, months of exhausting campaigning, bitter personal attacks, crippling back pain, and an apparent assassination attempt with poison. Now he is probably days away from confirmation as president, presuming that challenges over voting irregularities in Sunday's runoff are cleared up and the results are validated.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | By Si Liberman, FOR THE INQUIRER
For years, I've had this strange fascination with the south Ukrainian coastal cities of Yalta and Odessa. You might call it a kind of must-see imperative. It was from Odessa that my father emigrated 83 years ago. And Yalta is where Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin secretly met near the end of World War II to agree on zones of occupation after Nazi Germany's surrender, and to lay the groundwork for creation of the United Nations. A 12-day Black Sea cruise in early October on the Royal Princess, a 1,200-passenger ocean liner christened by Princess Diana in 1986, was just the ticket - an opportunity for my wife, Dorothy, and me to see both areas while traveling in comfort.
NEWS
September 9, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
PUT A LID ON IT, JUDGE TELLS CAFE OWNERS Cafe ensembles that enchant tourists with romantic melodies in Venice's Piazza San Marco will have to decrescendo or pack up their instrument cases for good. A judge has given the small orchestras of the Italian piazza's four historic cafes 10 days in which to lower their volume. If not, the city will confiscate the bandstands that draw thousands of customers to the cafes' outdoor tables between April and October. Judge Sara Natto issued her order after tests showed that the music exceeded 65 decibels, the limit for daytime noise levels.
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Klavdia Penkova didn't look like a warmonger. The 76-year-old gray-haired woman was just sitting quietly on a park bench, asking passersby to sign a petition. But her petition urged that this historic Crimean city and all the ships of the Black Sea Fleet be placed under Russian control. Here in newly independent Ukraine, those are fighting words. Nationalists in both Ukraine and Russia have made the fate of the fleet and its home port of Sevastopol volatile issues that threaten to deeply divide the two Slavic republics.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alexander Polanski, a pilot for Air Ukraine, is lucky to fly once a month. Almost all of the airline's domestic schedule has been canceled because the cost of aviation fuel has soared. Two years ago, when Ukraine got much of its oil almost for free from Russia, about 240 planes a day flew in and out of Zhulyani Airport here. Now, with Russia charging close to world-market prices for fuel, only 12 flights are scheduled daily. And only one, to the Crimean vacation spot Simfiropol, is guaranteed to fly every day. "It is the only place left for Ukrainians to take a rest," said Victor Kupchik, the deputy head for technical services at the airport.
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Russian Vice President Alexander V. Rutskoi, the legal successor to President Boris N. Yeltsin, would likely pursue a far more conservative line in foreign affairs, economic reform and Russian internal relations if he becomes president. A much-decorated pilot in the Afghan war, Rutskoi describes himself as a patriot who favors the establishment of a "Great Russian" state. He has long attacked Yeltsin's economic reforms and has left little doubt he would like to roll back many of the changes and reinstate stronger state control over the economy.
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