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Criminal Act

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NEWS
March 10, 2001 | By Patt Morrison
I think I have some inkling how Andy Williams felt Monday morning. Monday morning meant another week of school. Another five days of hearing yourself called "dork," "freak," "geek," "nerd. " Five miserable days among teenagers bigger and older and cooler - the brash, self-assured boys, the pretty, laughing girls. Even when Andy warned some kids that he'd get even, even when he threatened, "I'll show you one day," they just laughed. Told him to his face that he didn't have the guts.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett said Friday that he was not worried about the probe the newly elected state attorney general has said she would conduct of his handling of the Jerry Sandusky investigation while he was Pennsylvania's top prosecutor. Speaking to reporters, the governor said he was not concerned about Kathleen Kane's pending probe because he did not do anything "criminal" when he oversaw the child-sexual-abuse case. "Anybody can sit down and Monday-morning quarterback decisions," said Corbett.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A coroner's jury ruled yesterday that the killing of nine British soldiers, who died during the gulf war as the result of "friendly fire" from two American jets, was a criminal act. After deliberating for five hours, the 11 jurors ruled the deaths "unlawful killings," a finding that amounts to a presumption of manslaughter. The stunning verdict represents neither a conviction nor an indictment, only a decision that a crime has been committed. Whether the American pilots will now be subject to criminal prosecution remains to be seen.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
I SIMPLY DON'T understand what makes people sympathetic toward criminals who complain about inhumane conditions in overcrowded prisons. The only thing that allows these criminals the right to complain is the Constitution, which we are all governed by. But the fact is that when you commit a criminal act, you are sent to prison as punishment and the fact that the conditions are horrible should make you never want to be there. My advice for overcrowding: "Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
HEY, STU, Great column about airport security. I see nothing wrong with questioning or retaining anyone who fits the profile of someone more likely to commit any criminal act. I'm not sure how it is in other countries, but Americans should start getting used to having their feelings hurt and their egos bruised if it's for the good of the nation. We've become way too sensitive and drunk on entitlement. Now if we can only find a way to convince the lawyers that it's not about them.
NEWS
November 24, 1986
To those who lament the severity of the sentence imposed upon Richard Keller, I would like to point out the reason for the severity. In this case of a man who painted racial slurs on a house to be occupied by a black woman, what the District Attorney's Office did was to make use of a law referred to as the Ethnic Intimidation Act. It is important that bigots know of the existence of this law and of District Attorney Ronald Castille's determination to...
NEWS
June 10, 2011
THERE have been very few heroes in my life - my father, a man who's been like a father and, at the top of my list, my husband. I never looked at celebrities or sport figures as heroes, but there have been two men outside my family who I have always admired. Dr. George Tillman, the abortion doctor, and Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who allowed many to die a dignified death. He showed them the compassion that society deems a criminal act. I felt sadness when I heard this great man had died. But I feel even more sadness for those in need who won't receive the dignified death we all so richly deserve.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Eight jurors looked on yesterday as City Council President John Street expressed outrage over a portrayal of him in a 1988 Philadelphia Inquirer column. With his voice cracking, Street told the Common Pleas Court jury he came "very close" to resigning from City Council the morning of Feb. 6, 1988, when he opened the newspaper to a column titled "John Street Is His Own Worst Enemy. " Street's testimony followed opening arguments in a libel suit filed by Street against former Inquirer columnist W. Russell G. Byers, who now works for the Daily News, and Philadelphia Newspapers Inc., parent company of both newspapers.
NEWS
December 18, 1986 | By Christopher Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article.)
A police officer whose undercover work led to the arrests of nine officers on corruption charges showed poor judgment but did not commit a criminal act when he contacted a police commander and three prosecutors on behalf of a friend under investigation in a drug case, departmental investigators have determined. Sgt. Andrew Kalmar, who is assigned to the Ethics Accountability Division, had been under investigation by the department's Internal Affairs Division for allegedly interfering in a narcotics case involving Ronna Sacks Harrow, 33, a paralegal in the district attorney's office.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
"The Ladies Club. " Directed by A.K. Allen. Based on the novel "Sisterhood," by Betty Black and Casey Bishop. Midtown Twin and area theaters. Running time: 90 minutes. 'The Ladies Club," a vengeance film with feminist sensibilities, proposes one criminal act - forcible castration - as the "cure" for another criminal act - rape. It's too far-fetched to work as advocacy, and too serious to click as vengeance. Vengeance films should stir the audience's blood with simple-minded appeals to passion - think about Rambo - that make the audience want to cheer when the bad guys get what they deserve.
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NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WALLACE STREET was quiet yesterday. An elderly man, sunning himself on his porch, said the block, near 38th Street in Mantua, had been "deserted" since Jamara Stevens, 11, was shot to death inside one of its homes April 5. "A terrible thing, losing a child like that," he said as he sat on his property, across the street from that home. "The only people who know what happened are the ones who were there. "And God, of course. " Which explains why police have issued an arrest warrant for Stevens' mom. Tiffany Goldwire, 31, is wanted for involuntary manslaughter in connection with her daughter's death, Lt. John Stanford, a police spokesman, said.
NEWS
April 17, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writervellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
WALLACE STREET was quiet today. An elderly man, sunning himself on his porch, said the block, near 38th Street in Mantua, had been "deserted" since Jamara Stevens, 11, was shot to death inside one of its homes April 5. "A terrible thing, losing a child like that," he said as he sat on his property, across the street from that home. "The only people who know what happened are the ones who were there. "And God, of course. " Which explains why police have issued an arrest warrant for Stevens' mom. Tiffany Goldwire, 31, is wanted for involuntary manslaughter in connection with her daughter's death, Lt. John Stanford, a police spokesman, said.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett said Friday that he was not worried about the probe the newly elected state attorney general has said she would conduct of his handling of the Jerry Sandusky investigation while he was Pennsylvania's top prosecutor. Speaking to reporters, the governor said he was not concerned about Kathleen Kane's pending probe because he did not do anything "criminal" when he oversaw the child-sexual-abuse case. "Anybody can sit down and Monday-morning quarterback decisions," said Corbett.
NEWS
November 10, 2012 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Corbett said Friday that he was not worried about the probe the newly elected state attorney general has said she would conduct of his handling of the Jerry Sandusky investigation while he was Pennsylvania's top prosecutor. Speaking to reporters, the governor said he was not concerned about Kathleen Kane's pending probe because he did not do anything "criminal" when he oversaw the child-sexual-abuse case. "Anybody can sit down and Monday-morning quarterback decisions," said Corbett.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
THERE have been very few heroes in my life - my father, a man who's been like a father and, at the top of my list, my husband. I never looked at celebrities or sport figures as heroes, but there have been two men outside my family who I have always admired. Dr. George Tillman, the abortion doctor, and Dr. Jack Kevorkian, who allowed many to die a dignified death. He showed them the compassion that society deems a criminal act. I felt sadness when I heard this great man had died. But I feel even more sadness for those in need who won't receive the dignified death we all so richly deserve.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
HEY, STU, Great column about airport security. I see nothing wrong with questioning or retaining anyone who fits the profile of someone more likely to commit any criminal act. I'm not sure how it is in other countries, but Americans should start getting used to having their feelings hurt and their egos bruised if it's for the good of the nation. We've become way too sensitive and drunk on entitlement. Now if we can only find a way to convince the lawyers that it's not about them.
NEWS
December 17, 2009
Americans were shocked two years ago to read that wounded soldiers were being housed at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in moldy, rotting buildings with cockroaches and mice. Ultimately, that reporting led to the firings of the secretary of the Army and two generals. But the articles wouldn't have been written without information provided to reporters by confidential sources who spoke up because their identities were hidden. Now, the Senate has an opportunity to establish federal protections that will make it easier for other government whistle-blowers to come forward when they see wrongs that won't be corrected unless the public is made aware.
NEWS
October 28, 2009 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
County Court Judge Chad F. Kenney looked out at his Delaware County courtroom yesterday and acknowledged the irony that the victim's family was sitting on the side of the defendant. In this case, the defendant, Maribel Rodriguez, was also a member of the victim's family. In September, the Sharon Hill mother was convicted in the stabbing death of her daughter, Yeydilyss Acevedo, during a heated argument. "Where is the family to cry for this victim?" Kenney asked. Where were the stories of how there would be no prom, high school graduation, college years, or marriage?
NEWS
January 29, 2008
A criminal act should get criminal citation Thank goodness for crossing guards like Theresa Robbins, who was profiled by Monica Yant Kinney for saving the lives of two young schoolchildren as they were crossing the street ("The almost unsung hero of Bristol Pike," Jan. 23). Please tell me, though, that the driver of the Cadillac who didn't slow down at all, and who didn't clear or defrost her windshield, did not get off with just a citation. The safety director said, "It's not criminal.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
I SIMPLY DON'T understand what makes people sympathetic toward criminals who complain about inhumane conditions in overcrowded prisons. The only thing that allows these criminals the right to complain is the Constitution, which we are all governed by. But the fact is that when you commit a criminal act, you are sent to prison as punishment and the fact that the conditions are horrible should make you never want to be there. My advice for overcrowding: "Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.
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