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Criminal Law

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April 28, 1989 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
"Whoever fights monsters should see to it that in the process he does not become a monster. And when you look long into the abyss, the abyss , also looks into you. " - Nietzsche Had you missed the first few minutes of "Criminal Law" the above admonition, illuminating the screen close on the heels of the opening title, would seem particularly well-suited as a preface to a horror film filled with all manner of darkness and demons. However, having been appropriately prepped by the title that this is a film about law and lawyers, courts and justice, you tend to settle into your seat slightly removed - only to find that "Criminal Law's" premise contains a spectre scarier than Freddy Kruger and his fingernails.
NEWS
July 22, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has a wealth of experience: Government lawyer. Civil litigator. Appellate specialist. But when it comes to criminal law, he just doesn't have much of a track record. That has left legal scholars searching for clues about how Roberts, who was nominated Tuesday by President Bush for the nation's highest court, might approach such hot-button topics as the death penalty and other issues affecting the administration of justice. "The central reality is that it hasn't been part of who he is as a lawyer," said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University who called Roberts an "interesting blank slate" on criminal law matters.
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Pether, 55, of Haverford, a law professor at Villanova University, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of cancer at Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Pether was a widely published legal scholar, specializing in the theory and practice of judging in the federal courts; feminist legal theory; the history of racial discrimination; and rape-law reform. "Penny Pether was a well-respected educator, dedicated mentor, and beloved friend and colleague," said John Gotanda, dean of the Villanova School of Law. "Her passion for teaching was immeasurable, and her death is a tremendous loss for the Villanova Law community.
NEWS
May 27, 2015
LYING TO GET sex has been going on since Adam ate the proverbial apple. It will never stop. But wouldn't it be great if there was somewhere that a burned lover could turn to if she discovered that the man who told her he was childless not only had a 10-year-old, but also a pregnant side jawn? Or if the person they're sleeping with showed them photos of a beautiful home he claimed to own but in reality was living in his parents' basement? In other words, wouldn't it be great if a woman duped into having sex could have the jerk arrested?
NEWS
February 8, 2013
By Paul H. Robinson A hacker is illegally downloading millions of files through computer equipment surreptitiously installed in a utility closet in the victim's basement. Previous attempts to stop the illegal downloading have been countered with a change in strategy by the persistent hacker. When the illicit equipment is finally discovered in the closet, police install a surveillance camera to catch the intruder. After a few misses, he is caught and charged. A law enforcement success?
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | BY GERALD K. McOSCAR
Government and the laws and regulations that make it visible is like a ship, never quite at rest even on the calmest sea, its joints constantly straining and groaning against forces both within and without as it sails on a sea of apathy. Because this ship of state is constantly being buffeted by wave after wave of conflicting interests, one of the roles of the judiciary has been to serve as a beacon of light above the fray to insure that the political game is being played fairly and that the government functions legally, justly, and to further the common good.
NEWS
October 18, 2001 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
District Attorney Anthony Sarcione was a first-year law student when his brother, who was in his second year of law school, was fatally shot during an armed robbery in Westtown Township. "That experience changed my life and the lives of my entire family," Sarcione said. "It's definitely responsible for the direction my career took. " Sarcione, 47, of West Chester, is one of two Republican candidates running unopposed for the Chester County Court seats being vacated by retiring Judges Lawrence E. Wood and M. Joseph Melody.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A lawyer defending an alleged drug dealer has unveiled a novel defense: He says the courts shouldn't waste time trying drug dealers who beat or kill other pushers. "It's a disgrace for the commonwealth to come in here and say it wants to protect these poor, misguided drug dealers," said attorney Norris E. Gelman yesterday. Gelman said dealers put themselves "outside the protection of the law," and shouldn't be allowed to come to court and say, "Protect me, my drug deal went bad. " Gelman spoke at a preliminary hearing for his client and a co-defendant accused of beating a fellow drug dealer last year.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | By Robert W. Tracinski
Tuesday, the Senate passed legislation for a federal "hate-crimes" bill. Such a law would make crimes motivated by enmity toward blacks, gays or other protected groups into a special federal offense. The ostensible purpose of such a law is to protect minorities from persecution. The result, however, would be the exact opposite. Criminal law exists to prohibit certain actions - to safeguard individuals against force or fraud. For this purpose, there is no shortage of existing statutes.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Charles H. Rogovin, 84, of West Conshohocken, a law school professor and longtime law enforcement official at the state and federal level, died Sunday, Jan. 10, of a suspected heart attack at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Rogovin, a specialist in criminal law, as well as in organized and white-collar crime, joined the Temple University School of Law faculty in 1977. At his retirement in 2009, he was named professor of law emeritus. He held numerous high-profile jobs in public service.
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NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Charles H. Rogovin, 84, of West Conshohocken, a law school professor and longtime law enforcement official at the state and federal level, died Sunday, Jan. 10, of a suspected heart attack at Lankenau Hospital. Mr. Rogovin, a specialist in criminal law, as well as in organized and white-collar crime, joined the Temple University School of Law faculty in 1977. At his retirement in 2009, he was named professor of law emeritus. He held numerous high-profile jobs in public service.
NEWS
May 27, 2015
LYING TO GET sex has been going on since Adam ate the proverbial apple. It will never stop. But wouldn't it be great if there was somewhere that a burned lover could turn to if she discovered that the man who told her he was childless not only had a 10-year-old, but also a pregnant side jawn? Or if the person they're sleeping with showed them photos of a beautiful home he claimed to own but in reality was living in his parents' basement? In other words, wouldn't it be great if a woman duped into having sex could have the jerk arrested?
NEWS
September 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penelope Pether, 55, of Haverford, a law professor at Villanova University, died Tuesday, Sept. 10, of cancer at Pennsylvania Hospital. Dr. Pether was a widely published legal scholar, specializing in the theory and practice of judging in the federal courts; feminist legal theory; the history of racial discrimination; and rape-law reform. "Penny Pether was a well-respected educator, dedicated mentor, and beloved friend and colleague," said John Gotanda, dean of the Villanova School of Law. "Her passion for teaching was immeasurable, and her death is a tremendous loss for the Villanova Law community.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
By Paul H. Robinson A hacker is illegally downloading millions of files through computer equipment surreptitiously installed in a utility closet in the victim's basement. Previous attempts to stop the illegal downloading have been countered with a change in strategy by the persistent hacker. When the illicit equipment is finally discovered in the closet, police install a surveillance camera to catch the intruder. After a few misses, he is caught and charged. A law enforcement success?
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
JOSHUA SCOTT ALBERT, an unemployed blogger who had attracted the wrath of local restaurateurs before he recently triggered outrage among law-enforcement authorities for Facebook pages he created, apparently didn't realize his antics could get himself in deep trouble. But after the District Attorney's Office on Monday said it had charged the 26-year-old with serious offenses, Albert posted on his Staph Meal blog: "This Is A Sad Day for American Civil Liberties. " And in smaller print: "That's all I have to say. " Albert was not yet in custody as of Monday night.
NEWS
May 3, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's fortune-tellers are reading palms, tea leaves and tarot cards again, one week after the Philadelphia Department of Licenses and Inspections ordered them closed. The City Solicitor's Office said yesterday that it had advised L&I to back off because the state law banning fortune-tellers seemed better suited to fraud prosecution than to regulation. Last week, L&I inspectors closed at least 16 establishments after police called the department's attention to a state criminal statute that makes it a misdemeanor for any person to "pretend for gain or lucre to tell fortunes or predict future events.
NEWS
February 3, 2006 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abdus Malik was looking at 15 years in prison - minimum. His crime? Possession of two guns. Malik, 45, of Camden, was nabbed in a federal investigation in Philadelphia targeting so-called "straw buyers," who legally buy guns with the purpose of reselling them illegally. Malik faced such a lengthy prison term at his sentencing yesterday because he has a violent record, including a murder conviction when he was a teenager. Under the armed career-criminal statute, anyone with three convictions for violence or drugs faces a minimum of 15 years for possessing a gun. In addition to his murder conviction, Malik had drug and assault arrests in the 1990s.
NEWS
July 22, 2005 | By Emilie Lounsberry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has a wealth of experience: Government lawyer. Civil litigator. Appellate specialist. But when it comes to criminal law, he just doesn't have much of a track record. That has left legal scholars searching for clues about how Roberts, who was nominated Tuesday by President Bush for the nation's highest court, might approach such hot-button topics as the death penalty and other issues affecting the administration of justice. "The central reality is that it hasn't been part of who he is as a lawyer," said Douglas Berman, a law professor at Ohio State University who called Roberts an "interesting blank slate" on criminal law matters.
NEWS
February 4, 2004 | By Gregory J. Sullivan
The American Civil Liberties Union, joined by the Constitutional Litigation Clinic at Rutgers Law School, has filed a lawsuit in New Jersey state court to lift the ban on serious criminals voting while on parole or probation. This case is an attempt to use the courts legislatively to make policy based on spurious and dangerous assumptions about race, crime, and law enforcement. It is an action that, in any reasonable system, would be laughed right out of court. In New Jersey courts, however, it might just succeed.
NEWS
October 30, 2002 | By Kathleen Brady Shea INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Paoli dentist, already facing the loss of his license, heard a former patient testify yesterday that she painfully regrets allowing him to remove 13 of her fillings based on his scary warnings about mercury poisoning. Jana Nestlerode, 53, of West Chester, said that after Dr. Anthony Roeder removed and replaced her amalgam fillings with composites, she endured months of pain and was unable to eat solid food. Since then, she has had one tooth extracted and four root canals. Nestlerode, who teaches criminal law at West Chester University, sued Roeder for malpractice in March 2000.
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