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Criminal Lawyer

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NEWS
December 14, 1996 | By Allie Shah and Bill Price, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael B. Kean, 58, a prominent Chester County criminal lawyer, died of cancer Wednesday at his home in East Bradford Township. Mr. Kean began practicing law in Chester County in 1968 after teaching for three years at St. Louis University Law School. In 1983, he started his own practice in West Chester after many years of association with law firms in the county. "He was an intelligent, capable attorney," said Chester County Judge Lawrence E. Wood. "He never overstated his case.
NEWS
February 7, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard L. Siegel, 73, of Northeast Philadelphia, a criminal lawyer and educator, died Tuesday, Jan. 17, of pancreatic cancer at Manor Care in Huntingdon Valley. After establishing a law practice in Center City in 1986, Mr. Siegel represented clients charged with robbery, rape, homicide, corruption, and embezzlement and was involved in several high-profile cases. In 1997, he was the attorney for Herbert Haak in the "Center City jogger" murder trial. On Nov. 2, 1995, Kimberly Ernest, 26, was found fatally beaten in a stairwell at 21st and Pine Streets.
NEWS
March 13, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Colas Carroll, 59, of Philadelphia, a criminal lawyer who defended mob figures, government officials, and champions of causes, died of a brain tumor Saturday at the Hospice at St. Agnes Medical Center in Philadelphia. While his legal maneuvers could have made spicy scripts for the television drama The Practice, his law partner, Mark Cedrone, said Mr. Carroll's style was not typical of the actors who portray the flamboyant, contentious defense lawyers on the program. "He was the antithesis of a grandstander," Cedrone said.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Bruce L. Castor Jr. has said he thought Bill Cosby was guilty. He has said he would like a chance to prosecute the comedian himself. But Castor has also said his declaration that he would not charge Cosby in 2005 - when he had the chance as Montgomery County district attorney - might prevent prosecutors from now pursuing their sexual-assault case against the comedian. How Castor reconciles these positions is likely to play a central role Tuesday at the first pivotal court hearing since Cosby's arrest last month.
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council will hire a criminal lawyer to investigate allegations of misconduct in the sheriff's office, and may take money out of the department's budget to reimburse homeowners reportedly bilked out of their equity after auction. Council unanimously passed a resolution introduced by Councilman Francis Rafferty yesterday to pay up to $10,000 for a consultant to assist its Legislative Oversight Committee in an investigation of the department headed by Sheriff Ralph C. Passio III. The Council investigation began last week, following Daily News reports that the FBI was investigating two real estate speculators who had gained access to the sheriff's foreclosure records and allegedly cheated unsuspecting homeowners of surplus equity - the money due them after their homes had been sold at sheriff's sale.
NEWS
February 13, 1997 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lester J. Schaffer, 84, a Center City lawyer, died yesterday of complications of pneumonia at the Logan East retirement community. Mr. Schaffer lived in Penn Valley for 50 years before moving to Logan East two weeks ago. He had been in declining health since breaking his hip in a fall last October. Mr. Schaffer had been devoted to the practice of law since 1937, when he was admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar. Until his fall, he commuted to the law office of Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley.
NEWS
April 10, 2012 | By Sally Downey, For The Inquirer
Donald J. Goldberg, 81 of Rittenhouse Square, a trial lawyer in Philadelphia for 58 years, died of complications from cancer Saturday, April 7, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1991, Mr. Goldberg had been special counsel in the litigation department of Ballard Spahr and was a member of the firm's white-collar investigations group. He previously had a solo practice in Center City for 30 years. "Partners and associates in the firm treasured any opportunity to learn from Don," Ballard Spahr chairman Mark Stewart said.
NEWS
May 26, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Milton S. Leidner, 89, of Center City, a prominent criminal lawyer whose zeal on behalf of his clients sometimes got him in trouble with the law, died at his home on Tuesday. "He was considered a damn good advocate, one of the top five trial lawyers in the city," said his brother, Nelson J., who was also a lawyer. "His cross-examination was terrific, and he knew criminal law forwards, backwards and sideways. Judges said to him that it was a pleasure to try a case for someone who knew what the rules and procedures were all about.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacob Kossman, 79, a quick-thinking, gruff-talking criminal lawyer who represented mob boss Angelo Bruno and ex-Teamsters president Jimmy Hoffa during a long career that brought him a string of major victories and a loyal following, died Sunday at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. He was a resident of Center City and Melrose Park. A man who chomped cigars and seemed to dress to clash, the stocky, bespectacled Mr. Kossman worked for most of his career from cluttered offices in the 1300 block of Spruce Street.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prosecutors on Friday filed motions seeking to have the two teenage brothers charged with murder in the strangulation of 12-year-old Autumn Pasquale tried as adults. Gloucester County Assistant Prosecutor Michelle Jeneby announced the move after a juvenile detention hearing in Woodbury at which the pair were ordered to remain in custody until another hearing on Dec. 13. Before the detention proceeding, Superior Court Judge Colleen A. Maier held another hearing that lasted for 31/2 hours on motions filed by news media organizations, including The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News, to have the juvenile proceedings opened to reporters.
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NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITERS
Bruce L. Castor Jr. has said he thought Bill Cosby was guilty. He has said he would like a chance to prosecute the comedian himself. But Castor has also said his declaration that he would not charge Cosby in 2005 - when he had the chance as Montgomery County district attorney - might prevent prosecutors from now pursuing their sexual-assault case against the comedian. How Castor reconciles these positions is likely to play a central role Tuesday at the first pivotal court hearing since Cosby's arrest last month.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Months before prosecutors in Norristown filed the first sexual-assault case against Bill Cosby last year, Montgomery County's former district attorney sought to persuade his successor to abandon the investigation. In a Sept. 23 email reviewed by The Inquirer, Bruce L. Castor Jr. told then-District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman that he had struck a deal 10 years earlier never to criminally prosecute the comedian for an alleged 2004 attack on a Temple University employee. Castor wrote that, at the time, he hoped his decision would facilitate accuser Andrea Constand's efforts to depose Cosby in a civil suit she planned to file against him. Now, a Common Pleas Court judge has been asked to decide whether that agreement existed and, if it did, whether it protects Cosby from the three counts of aggravated indecent assault filed against him last month.
NEWS
September 10, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was the only former Philadelphia Traffic Court judge to walk free after a hard-fought federal corruption trial last year. Now, prosecutors are taking aim at Michael J. Sullivan for a second shot - even if one of his lawyers is already calling it a cheap one. "It's what you call sore-loser charges," attorney Sam Stretton said of the misdemeanor tax-fraud case filed against Sullivan on Tuesday. "That's a pretty sad day for the federal government, if they're reduced to this type of approach.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IT SEEMED as if Richard Johnson was always looking after society's underdogs. As a criminal-defense lawyer, his concern for his clients extended well beyond the courtroom. "He wanted to encourage his clients to turn their lives around," said his daughter, Diahnne. "He tried to show them there was a better way to live. " And when Richard worked for the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, one of his jobs was to make sure minority workers got a fair shake. Richard Ernest Johnson, who opened his own law office in Center City in the mid-'70s, a history and news junkie who devoured newspapers and magazines and kept up with TV news shows, and a devoted family patriarch, died of heart failure July 31. He was 89 and lived in Center City.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY ELLEN GRAY, Daily News Television Critic graye@phillynews.com, 215-854-5950
PASADENA, Calif. - Even Vince Gilligan wasn't always sure "Better Call Saul" was a TV show. "There were days when we said, 'Oh, man, have we agreed to do - actually not agreed - have we pushed to do a TV show about a guy who doesn't necessarily warrant a TV show?' " said the "Breaking Bad" creator, who, along with Peter Gould, conceived the prequel that premieres Sunday on AMC. "We knew we loved the character of Saul Goodman, we knew we loved Bob Odenkirk, but we really didn't know where the whole thing was going to go," said Gilligan, after an AMC news conference last month.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lawrence Watson, 76, of the city's Wynnefield section, a lawyer, died Tuesday, Aug. 26, of kidney failure at Presbyterian Hospital surrounded by family. Mr. Watson's interest in law, politics, and civil rights began early in his life. He participated in lunch-counter sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations in the 1950s and had occasions to speak with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., once while working the switchboard at his father's law practice. Mr. Watson was born in Philadelphia on Jan. 15, 1938, to Rufus and Arline Watson.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BEING THE subject of a Mafia murder contract carries with it a certain distinction. Not that you would be inclined to capitalize on such an honor, not if you were a prominent criminal lawyer like Donald C. Marino, one of the city's busiest attorneys who later became chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association. In fact, Marino, who died Monday at age 74, said he didn't know that he was one of the targets of the vengeful mob boss John Stanfa in 1993. Asked by Daily News reporter Kitty Caparella in 1996 if he knew about the contract, Marino replied, "This is the first I'm hearing about this.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Jay Lindsay, Associated Press
BOSTON - Nineteen days after Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev died following a gun battle with police, cemeteries still refused to take his remains and government officials deflected questions about where he could be buried. On Wednesday, police in Worcester, west of Boston, pleaded for a resolution, saying they were spending tens of thousands of dollars to protect the funeral home where his body is being kept amid protests. "We are not barbarians," Police Chief Gary Gemme said.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The series so far: New Leash on Life has been working with 12 inmates since late October, teaching them to train six dogs, rescued from shelters. The men have almost completed their life-skills courses, preparing for employment after their release. Nearly all the inmates and their dogs have developed strong emotional bonds, but some of the men have failed to change their way of thinking. On Christmas Eve, Ike and Mike got into a serious fight. After weeks of preparation, the dogs are about to take the AKC Canine Good Citizen Test.
NEWS
November 18, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prosecutors on Friday filed motions seeking to have the two teenage brothers charged with murder in the strangulation of 12-year-old Autumn Pasquale tried as adults. Gloucester County Assistant Prosecutor Michelle Jeneby announced the move after a juvenile detention hearing in Woodbury at which the pair were ordered to remain in custody until another hearing on Dec. 13. Before the detention proceeding, Superior Court Judge Colleen A. Maier held another hearing that lasted for 31/2 hours on motions filed by news media organizations, including The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News, to have the juvenile proceedings opened to reporters.
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