CollectionsCrises
IN THE NEWS

Crises

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 13, 1988 | By Melvin Maddocks
Radio talk show host: "Why is it that we can't seem to do anything about anything until it gets to be a crisis?" Guest expert (picking up on his cue): "Well, I'd say automobile insurance is pretty close to a crisis. . . . Yes, I'd say it's definitely in the crisis category. " Too late, you talk-show people. Nice try, but the '88 quota of crises has just been filled, and then some. We have crises standing in the waiting rooms. We have crises lined up in the street, winding around the block.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lockheed Martin Corp.'s Advanced Technology Laboratories in Cherry Hill received a $1.3 million contract yesterday to develop computer software that helps military commanders anticipate crises that could turn violent. The contract is for the first phase of a new system called "predicting stability through analyzing germane events," or PRESAGE. It was awarded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The Cherry Hill unit will spend the next 15 months integrating proven social-science models and evaluating data from military, economic, diplomatic and other sources.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper and Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Far from the staid chambers of the Senate, Secretary of State John Kerry has been presented with a full plate of global crises as he plots his maiden voyage abroad: Egypt in chaos, Syria engulfed in civil war, moribund Mideast peace talks, and North Korea threatening to detonate an atomic bomb while Iran moves closer to developing one of its own. As he seals his transition from legislator to diplomat with his first official trip overseas,...
NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Like omelets and broken eggs, little old ladies and tennis shoes, and crying and spilt milk, historic preservation and crisis are words that seem inextricably linked. This is easy to understand. Buildings and places that aren't threatened by development or physical deterioration don't need any organized effort to save them. Responsible, sensitive maintenance is the ultimate preservation strategy, but that is a lesson most often learned only after years of neglect. Thus, although preservation is institutionalized in the United States as never before - in the federal tax code and environmental legislation and in many city and county building regulations and planning policies - the crises have not gone away.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
Still rattled by Asian economic and Iraqi diplomatic crises, American investors sought solace in government bonds. Blue-chip stocks fell.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
When I was 17, as I was leaving my house to watch a late-night movie at a friend's house, a boy from my block told me he was going to be a father. His expression was more contemplative than jubilant. I will never forget it. He was 19. The next morning, my father came into my room, teary-eyed, and before his lips parted, I knew what had happened. "Your friend . . . basement . . . mother found him . . . gun. " I was paralyzed by these words, by a single bullet that rippled heartache through our community.
NEWS
May 18, 2010
The Democrats DAN ONORATO What we said: "Running a state in these times will take smarts, guts and executive experience to manage the crises. " The Republicans TOM CORBETT What we said: "He is the only Republican in the race who seems to think state government has some value. "
NEWS
June 16, 1997 | by Jamal Watson, Daily News Staff Writer
Vernard Trent has seen his share of crises in Philadelphia public schools. He was the on-call psychologist two years ago helping students cope with the rape of a Martin Luther King high-school teacher in her classroom. Now, as adviser for school safety for the School District's Family Resource Network, Trent spends much of his time working with counselors, teachers, administrators and parents, teaching them how to help children cope with emergencies and crises. Those crises can occur in school, as with the rape in February of a Barratt Middle School pupil by two other pupils.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
A CHILD starving in South Sudan should matter to Americans. That was the message delivered last week by Nancy Lindborg, whose job at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is to lead a federal bureau spreading democracy and humanitarian assistance across the world. That world has reached a critical danger zone, with three high-level crises combining military conflict with humanitarian catastrophes affecting millions of innocents in Syria, the South Sudan and the Central African Republic.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | Associated Press
GALESBURG, Ill. - Seeking to build momentum for looming fiscal fights, President Obama yesterday cast himself as the champion for middle-class Americans struggling to make ends meet. He chided Washington for having "taken its eye off the ball" and declared that the economy would be the "highest priority" of his second term. Obama, in an hourlong address that was at times deeply partisan, also accused Republican lawmakers of succumbing to "an endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 23, 2014
PENNSYLVANIA is a state dealing with multiple crises. It faces a crisis in education, to be sure. And a new report by the Keystone Research Center suggests a serious jobs crisis: The state has slipped to last place among 50 states in job growth. According to data by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Pennsylvania lost 9,600 jobs in September alone. Between 2011 and 2014, the state experienced a paltry 2 percent growth in jobs. Compare that with the 22 percent growth in North Dakota, or the 11 percent growth in Texas.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Janani Rangaswami, M.D., For The Inquirer
Evan's family looked on distraughtly as he lay in the intensive care unit, connected to a ventilator with a sea of tubes enveloping him. This was the third time the previously healthy sophomore had had to be hospitalized for sudden difficulty with breathing. Active on his college's basketball team, Evan began having problems three months earlier, when he lost consciousness and had a seizure on the basketball court. When he was rushed to the hospital, his lungs were found to be full of fluid, and his blood pressure was sky-high: 230/130.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Pennsylvania State Police, the timing could not have been worse. They were still mourning a young trooper who was shot to death at his northeast Pennsylvania barracks. They were worrying about another who was seriously injured in the same attack. More than 1,000 officers were three weeks into a grueling backwoods manhunt, on high alert for booby traps set by the alleged cop-hating killer. In Harrisburg, their commissioner had recently been linked to a pornographic e-mail scandal.
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - In 2006, shortly after his election to the U.S. Senate, Bob Casey walked into a briefing room with top lawmakers - including Barack Obama and John Kerry - and members of the Iraqi parliament. These were not the kinds of meetings he had held as Pennsylvania's auditor general and treasurer. "That was kind of my first introduction to a foreign-relations engagement," Casey, a Democrat, recalled the other day. Soon, four new members of Congress from the Philadelphia area will face a similar transition, just as international crises have come to dominate Congress' attention.
NEWS
April 18, 2014
A CHILD starving in South Sudan should matter to Americans. That was the message delivered last week by Nancy Lindborg, whose job at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is to lead a federal bureau spreading democracy and humanitarian assistance across the world. That world has reached a critical danger zone, with three high-level crises combining military conflict with humanitarian catastrophes affecting millions of innocents in Syria, the South Sudan and the Central African Republic.
NEWS
October 27, 2013 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
When I was 17, as I was leaving my house to watch a late-night movie at a friend's house, a boy from my block told me he was going to be a father. His expression was more contemplative than jubilant. I will never forget it. He was 19. The next morning, my father came into my room, teary-eyed, and before his lips parted, I knew what had happened. "Your friend . . . basement . . . mother found him . . . gun. " I was paralyzed by these words, by a single bullet that rippled heartache through our community.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | Associated Press
GALESBURG, Ill. - Seeking to build momentum for looming fiscal fights, President Obama yesterday cast himself as the champion for middle-class Americans struggling to make ends meet. He chided Washington for having "taken its eye off the ball" and declared that the economy would be the "highest priority" of his second term. Obama, in an hourlong address that was at times deeply partisan, also accused Republican lawmakers of succumbing to "an endless parade of distractions and political posturing and phony scandals.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT - As the once-proud city of Detroit humbles itself in bankruptcy court, its financial future may hinge on this key question: Is the city obliged to its past? Or can Detroit renege on its promises to thousands of retirees for the sake of its present city services? The legal question at the heart of Detroit's bankruptcy filing has never definitively been answered by the nation's highest courts. But it could become increasingly important as cities from coast to coast are grappling with shortfalls in pension funds that left unchecked could force cutbacks to police, firefighters and other city services.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
By David Smoldt Government officials are warning of a drought across more than half the country this summer, with potentially ominous implications for America's grain belt. That's on top of the drought that hit 14 states this winter, threatening the viability of the nation's winter wheat crop. But don't start hoarding food yet. Market forces have helped us avert climate-fueled threats to the food supply in the past. This time won't be different. For evidence, consider the drought that afflicted nearly two-thirds of America last summer.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Bradley Klapper and Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Far from the staid chambers of the Senate, Secretary of State John Kerry has been presented with a full plate of global crises as he plots his maiden voyage abroad: Egypt in chaos, Syria engulfed in civil war, moribund Mideast peace talks, and North Korea threatening to detonate an atomic bomb while Iran moves closer to developing one of its own. As he seals his transition from legislator to diplomat with his first official trip overseas,...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|