CollectionsCrisis Intervention
IN THE NEWS

Crisis Intervention

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR TOO LONG I have listened, aghast, to stories shared by Dee Cocchia. She's co-executive director of Vision For Equality, a nonprofit that advocates on behalf of intellectually disabled folks and their families. If you don't know anyone who has an intellectual disability, your eyes probably just glazed over and you're now turning the page in search of a more exciting read. But if you do know someone with an intellectual disability, Cocchia's stories will be horrifying and, perhaps, familiar.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware County police are being trained as members of a crisis intervention team to help deal more effectively with the mentally ill. Twenty-nine officers are participating in the four-day class held at the Delaware County Emergency Services Training Center in Sharon Hill. The training will attempt to divert those with mental illness from prison into treatment programs. Classes include suicide risk and assessment, working with the homeless, behavioral health issues with older adults, and street level drugs.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darryl L. Coates, 55, an executive who worked to stem the tide of drug abuse and violence among Philadelphia's young people, died Thursday, Oct. 2, of complications from a stroke at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From 2005 until he became ill in 2012, Mr. Coates was executive director of the Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network (PAAN), where he collaborated with city, state, and national officials on intervention strategies. "Darryl led with authority and strength, and served with humility," PAAN said in a statement on its website.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By Troy Graham and Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia Police Department has agreed to buy 1,000 Tasers to expand the use of less-than-lethal weapons by officers often called upon to deal with unruly, mentally ill people. The cost, about $850,000, will be paid from a pool of federal stimulus money the city received last year. In total, the department is to receive $1.9 million to buy nonlethal weapons and train officers to use them. The deployment of such weapons has been a priority of Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who has advocated a training program designed to reduce violent confrontations between police and the mentally ill. In July, officers killed a mentally ill homeless man wielding a box cutter in a Center City concourse.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two rookie officers who persuaded a distraught person not to jump from the roof of a four-story building in the Ludlow section of North Philadelphia last month were saluted yesterday by Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey. The 26th District's Michael Cermignano, who has been on the job six months, and Domenic Bowes, on the job a year, were given commendations of merit. "We're here today to honor a couple of officers who performed an outstanding job and actually saved the life of an individual," Ramsey said from Police Headquarters, where he read their citations.
NEWS
November 20, 1986 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holy Family College's shady, green campus seems a world away from the gritty street scenes that a police officer lives with every day. But officials of the Philadelphia Police Academy decided that professors at the 1,600-student Torresdale college had a thing or two to teach police recruits about urban affairs, Hispanic culture, psychology, deviant behavior and crisis intervention. For the second year in a row, Holy Family has been selected to offer an 80- hour course in urban studies that is required by the city as a supplement to the 480-hour curriculum mandated by the state for police training.
NEWS
July 20, 2000
Shoot me!" cried Robert Brown, in a spasm of what appeared to be rage and madness. And in a perverted act of customer satisfaction, Amtrak police did exactly that. Brown, a homeless man with, it's being presumed, mental-health problems, is now dead. A police officer's career may be ruined as a result. And Philadelphia, which was counting on the upcoming GOP convention to shine a flattering spotlight on the city as a tourist destination, now has another ugly stain to deal with.
NEWS
January 30, 2005 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A half-century ago, county judge Lester A. Drenk saw many youths enter his courtroom in need of treatment, not jail time. The experience led him to spearhead the founding of the Burlington County Guidance Center, along with the freeholders. The center opened its doors Dec. 31, 1954, on High Street in Mount Holly. Its beginnings were humble, providing care for 16 adolescent boys with mental-health problems. Since that time, more than 100,000 people have been treated. The facility - renamed the Lester A. Drenk Behavorial Health Center when Drenk died, five years after the founding - has been at the forefront of providing quality care to residents of Burlington and surrounding counties.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | By Joseph A. Rogers
We ask the police to do many things in our society. Often we ask them to do these things without the training they need to complete their job most safely and effectively. That appeared to be the case Tuesday morning at 30th Street Station, when an Amtrak police officer fatally shot Robert Brown, a homeless man who had been yelling and waving a metal chair. This incident marked the second time in six months that a Philadelphian with an emotional disorder has been shot and killed by a police officer.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 25-year veteran of the Lower Merion Township Police Department was found dead Monday, evidently a suicide. Officer Sean Quinn was found in his car in Franklin D. Roosevelt Park in South Philadelphia. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said. "The Lower Merion Police Department wishes to express its heartfelt condolences to Officer Quinn's family and friends, and asks that they be kept in your thoughts and prayers as we all try to come to terms with this tragic event," said Police Superintendent Michael McGrath, who issued an alert Monday morning that Quinn, 46, of Aston, was missing after not reporting for his 7 a.m. shift.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
FOR TOO LONG I have listened, aghast, to stories shared by Dee Cocchia. She's co-executive director of Vision For Equality, a nonprofit that advocates on behalf of intellectually disabled folks and their families. If you don't know anyone who has an intellectual disability, your eyes probably just glazed over and you're now turning the page in search of a more exciting read. But if you do know someone with an intellectual disability, Cocchia's stories will be horrifying and, perhaps, familiar.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams has been through it: A young black man dead at the hands of police, an angry community demanding answers. As his office investigated the December shooting death of Brandon Tate-Brown, a 26-year-old African American, Williams said, he had the man's mother, her attorney, and several clergy members review videotapes and statements in the case. In March, Williams announced that the officers involved would face no charges. Many people were irate.
NEWS
December 30, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Sister Joan Schmal, 82, who was recognized for her work with youth on addiction issues, died Monday, Dec. 22, of cardiopulmonary collapse at Assisi House in Aston. A member of the sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 61 years, Sister Joan was known for her crisis skills in dealing with youth and ran programs for children of alcoholics and for students struggling with drug and alcohol issues at John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School in the Franklintown section of the city.
NEWS
October 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Darryl L. Coates, 55, an executive who worked to stem the tide of drug abuse and violence among Philadelphia's young people, died Thursday, Oct. 2, of complications from a stroke at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. From 2005 until he became ill in 2012, Mr. Coates was executive director of the Philadelphia Anti-Drug/Anti-Violence Network (PAAN), where he collaborated with city, state, and national officials on intervention strategies. "Darryl led with authority and strength, and served with humility," PAAN said in a statement on its website.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
WHEN MY BROTHER, who had severe epilepsy, died of a massive seizure at 32, I needed to see a grief counselor. I had been his primary caretaker, and his death hit me hard. I was fortunate to have access to workplace insurance that included quality mental-health services. It's a benefit I have come to really appreciate. But many people don't have access to such care. I was thinking about this as I followed news reports on the shooting rampage at the Washington Navy Yard in which 13 people were killed, including the gunman, and several others were injured.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 25-year veteran of the Lower Merion Township Police Department was found dead Monday, evidently a suicide. Officer Sean Quinn was found in his car in Franklin D. Roosevelt Park in South Philadelphia. He died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police said. "The Lower Merion Police Department wishes to express its heartfelt condolences to Officer Quinn's family and friends, and asks that they be kept in your thoughts and prayers as we all try to come to terms with this tragic event," said Police Superintendent Michael McGrath, who issued an alert Monday morning that Quinn, 46, of Aston, was missing after not reporting for his 7 a.m. shift.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Delaware County police are being trained as members of a crisis intervention team to help deal more effectively with the mentally ill. Twenty-nine officers are participating in the four-day class held at the Delaware County Emergency Services Training Center in Sharon Hill. The training will attempt to divert those with mental illness from prison into treatment programs. Classes include suicide risk and assessment, working with the homeless, behavioral health issues with older adults, and street level drugs.
NEWS
January 7, 2010 | By Troy Graham and Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Philadelphia Police Department has agreed to buy 1,000 Tasers to expand the use of less-than-lethal weapons by officers often called upon to deal with unruly, mentally ill people. The cost, about $850,000, will be paid from a pool of federal stimulus money the city received last year. In total, the department is to receive $1.9 million to buy nonlethal weapons and train officers to use them. The deployment of such weapons has been a priority of Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who has advocated a training program designed to reduce violent confrontations between police and the mentally ill. In July, officers killed a mentally ill homeless man wielding a box cutter in a Center City concourse.
NEWS
May 7, 2008 | By Barbara Boyer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two rookie officers who persuaded a distraught person not to jump from the roof of a four-story building in the Ludlow section of North Philadelphia last month were saluted yesterday by Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey. The 26th District's Michael Cermignano, who has been on the job six months, and Domenic Bowes, on the job a year, were given commendations of merit. "We're here today to honor a couple of officers who performed an outstanding job and actually saved the life of an individual," Ramsey said from Police Headquarters, where he read their citations.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|