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NEWS
May 18, 1993
The Serbs won. So did the Croats. Humanity once again loses a tough one. Europe dithered. George Bush dithered. Europe dithered some more. Bill Clinton dithered. Europe yet again dithered. Just about everybody we might have helped to survive the ethnic slaughter generated by tired old communists trying to keep their jobs by stirring up nationalism either is under attack, has been moved to some lousy refugee area or is already dead, the likely fate of the first two categories.
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ivanka Mazic climbed through the window of the home she hadn't seen since Sept. 1, 1991. With consternation, she realized that there was little she recognized, not the cheap furniture that had replaced her own, not the photographs of complete strangers scattered about the living room. She quickly scooped up the photographs, though not to throw away. "I want to know who these people are, not that I'd ever want to meet them," declared Mazic scornfully. Such is the attitude of many victorious Croats who have started trickling back to the territory known as the Krajina, where Serbs booted them out nearly four years ago. Despite the official line of the Croatian government that Serbs are welcome to remain, few seem eager to welcome them back as neighbors.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Damir Vandelic should be at home, finishing his last year of college. Instead, for 47 days, the mechanical-engineering student has been a prisoner of war, held by the ethnic Serbian territorial forces here. His only contact with the outside world was one telephone call a month ago to his fiancee. He wept last week as he recalled her voice. "This is really and truly a confused situation," said Vandelic, a 23- year-old Croat. "I was the best student at the university last year, but I can't understand this war. We have the same language, we have similar culture.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
In a well-meaning op-ed piece for the New York Times, Balkans specialist Robert Kaplan suggests Pope John Paul II has a role to play in Yugoslavia. Perish the thought. Flight time from Vatican City to Zagreb is no more than it is from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, but the most logical papal imperative for the current internecine strife in Yugoslavia can be stated in just two words. Stay away. If the pope must indulge his voracious yen for travel and practice his particular brand of statesmanship at the same time, he could fly down to Baghdad and try talking some sense into Iraqi tyrant Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
May 13, 1993 | Daily News wire services
Clouds of smoke and the violent pop of small arms fire rose over the southwest Bosnian city of Mostar today as scattered fighting persisted between erstwhile Moslem and Croat allies, Croatian radio reported. A cease-fire signed by Gen. Milivoj Petkovic of the Croats and Bosnian army chief Gen. Sefer Halilovic was to have taken effect at 6 p.m. yesterday. But Croatian radio said two Croat soldiers were killed during the night by Moslem snipers. Small arms fire and several detonations punctured the truce today, but the Croatian radio report said fighting was not as intense.
NEWS
January 12, 1992 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
A child's tricycle sits in the grass outside the Borota brothers' new home in the northeast corner of Croatia, although neither has children young enough to ride it. The cupboards are full of photographs of people they've never known, of clothes they've never worn, and a brand of whiskey they've never tasted. The Borotas are Serbs. Their new home belongs to a Croat. They moved to this Serbian-controlled town in December after being driven out of their native village by Croatian forces.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three Soviet-style tanks hunker, ready for action, on the side of the road winding down from the mountains into this town on the front line in the battle between Croats and Serbs in southwestern Croatia. "God will avenge the deaths," proclaim hand-painted white signs scrawled across the green tanks in Serbian, Cyrillic letters. While international mediators attempt to re-establish the troubled peace in Serb-held areas of Croatia, the Croats and Serbs are fighting a brutal war that threatens to escalate out of control.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | By SRECKO JOE KEREKOVIC
The carnage and destruction that the Serbian-dominated army and the Serbian irregulars are perpetrating in Croatia is not an ethnic war as some suggest. It is an imperial conquest by the last colonial power in the world today - the Serbian Reich. Slobodan Milosevic, the president of Serbia, had given a justification to the war two months ago when he said, "We Serbs perhaps cannot work but we can fight. " This admission and a boast, told in front of the television cameras, tells everything about the Serbs.
NEWS
September 4, 1992 | By David Zucchino, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At a bombed-out gas station, next to a highway whose lanes are reserved for either Croats or Serbs, beyond a U.N. checkpoint where Jordanians and Nepalese speak English to Croats, it seemed only fitting that a simple bus arrival would degenerate into chaos. Croatia and Serbia were attempting a refugee swap. No one could explain precisely how it unfolded Wednesday afternoon, least of all the Croats or Serbs. It was determined only that about 70 war refugees aboard a bus continued their troubled journey through the remains of the former Yugoslavia.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The young woman's hands shook and her voice broke as she described the terror her family experienced at the hands of the advancing Croatian army. The family had been driven out of its home in the coastal city of Zadar in 1991 as the Croats pursued their own aggressive policy of ethnic cleansing against Serbs. And then on Jan. 22, the family was driven from its new refuge, Smokovic, when the Croatian army began shelling the village in its drive to take the Serb-held Zadar airport.
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TRAVEL
July 22, 2013 | By Amy Laughinghouse, For The Inquirer
Since Croatia joined the European Union on July 1, this erstwhile slice of Yugoslavia is ready for its close-up. When many North Americans think of Croatia, if they think of it at all, they still picture it as battle-scarred. Yet the Croatian War of Independence, which saw Croats face off against Serb-led forces, was 20 years ago. Having achieved sovereignty and returned to peace, Croatia is emerging as a hotspot for tourists eager to discover its stunning Dalmatian Coast and museum-packed capital before the rest of the world arrives.
TRAVEL
June 2, 2013 | By Jillian Keenan, Washington Post
MOSTAR, Bosnia-Herzegovina - "Are you 1,000 percent certain I'm not about to die?" I asked, eyeing my taxi driver with suspicion. "One million percent," Zoran confirmed, nodding. We had just driven 30 minutes from the Bosnian town of Mostar to Kravica Waterfalls, one of Europe's most stunning natural sights. Zoran was insisting that I take a dip in the falls, even though the water is frigid almost all year-round. I was worried about the temperature. But I was even more worried about the snakes.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - The Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal acquitted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of one charge of genocide Thursday but upheld 10 other counts related to atrocities in Bosnia's bloody war. While the decision was a setback for prosecutors and angered survivors in Bosnia, the 10 pending charges against Karadzic include another genocide count covering his alleged involvement in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of 8,000...
SPORTS
July 12, 2010 | Staff and Wire Reports
Argentina and Serbia wrapped up Davis Cup quarterfinal victories on the road yesterday to join France and the Czech Republic in the tournament's last four. David Nalbandian beat Mikhail Youzhny , 7-6 (5), 6-4, 6-3, in the deciding match in Moscow to clinch Argentina's 3-2 win over Russia, which lost at home for the first time since 1996. In Split, Croatia, second-ranked Novak Djokovic defeated Marin Cilic , 6-3, 6-3, 6-2, in front of a raucous Croatian crowd to give Serbia an unassailable 3-1 lead over its neighbor.
NEWS
March 17, 2006
WILL the press stop the lies about Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic? He was a hero who fought for Christian Serbs against Muslim Albanians and Croats. Milosevic and the Christian Serbs fought to keep their country together in spite of crippling sanctions and numerous attempts by the British and United States to take Serb land and give it to Muslims. I guess Abe Lincoln was a war criminal. Didn't more than 600,000 boys die trying to keep his country together? Mike Franklin, Marlton, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2001 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The zeitgeist gods are at it again. Within mere days of each other, the zoom-y, gung-ho Spy Game (old movie star rescues young movie star from evil foreigners) and Behind Enemy Lines (ditto) have landed in the multiplexes, weirdly dovetailing with events in the real world: covert operations on hostile terrain, satellite surveillance photographs, helicopters disgorging goop-faced special forces, fighter jets exploding the sound barrier over faraway lands. Unlike Spy Game, Behind Enemy Lines wasn't directed by Tony Scott - but it sure looks as if it was. John Moore, an Irishman and a commercial director (Scott is an Englishman and, when he's not busy in Hollywood, a commercial director)
NEWS
June 20, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The footage is numbingly familiar. The tractors overloaded with household possessions, stuffed teddy bears peeking out from furniture stacked on the car roofs. The mute expressions on the faces of the women and children. It has been the grist of the evening news these last eight years in the former Yugoslavia, families pulling out of town, entire demographic populations on the move. Some have left at gunpoint. The Serbs high-tailing it out of Kosovo these last few days are for the most part leaving voluntarily, fearful of revenge by their Albanian neighbors or unwilling to live as a disempowered minority.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ever since she was punched and kicked by three men in the marketplace, Sadmira Jaganjac will not sit near the window in her home. A bullet might burst through, she says, or perhaps a grenade. Her husband Ragib, 65, sleeps with an ax and waits for intruders. It is tough, even dangerous, being a Muslim in Stolac. When the Jaganjacs arrived here in June - after four years of living as refugees - the Croats, who won this town in the Bosnian war, greeted them with guns and Nazi slogans.
NEWS
February 16, 1998 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the ash of her bombed home, the bent woman lifted the only thing she has recovered from the time before the war: a porcelain tea cup trimmed in gold and speckled with tiny moons. The charred cup carried memories of her "fairy tale" house of lace and sunlight; of her husband, who never heard the mortar shell whistling in the night; of the bullet that pierced her grandson's lung; of the soldiers who tore off her jewelry; and of the fire, that endless sweep of flame. Ajva Taslaman doesn't want to cry. But she does.
NEWS
October 14, 1997 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The boy who once fought with a Kalashnikov assault rifle has grown into a big, round-shouldered man with a memory as keen as a bullet. He conjures stories: a father killed by a grenade, a sister hit by sniper fire, bodies rotting on front lines, hungry dogs dodging tracers, pigeons roosting in bombed minarets. Suad Slipicevic has other memories, too: the scent of mown grass blowing through the windows of a Tudor-style home in Mount Airy; the corsage of red roses and baby's breath his date, Emily Hewes, wore to the Germantown Friends School prom; dancing in a black tuxedo at the Bellevue; the temptation to stay on streets of wealth; the resolve to return to the ruins of war. "I had to come back to Mostar," said Slipicevic, 19, a Muslim law student who arrived home in June after three semesters at Germantown Academy on a scholarship program.
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