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Crocodile Tears

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NEWS
February 17, 2003
RE "Romance turns into Gothic tale of death" (Feb. 11): Good story - but spare me the "she had a hard life" routine. It was no more then a lot of people. She took advantage of him just like Robert Blake's ex. If HE had done that to her and SHE shot him, it would be portrayed on Lifetime. I can see it now: "Lonely women is emotionally abused and scammed by Romeo, she shoots him in self-defense!" I'm not saying what he did was right, but, unlike her, he won't get off with a phony "battered-woman" defense.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Gerald McOscar
Pending the unlikely reversal of his sentence on appeal, the Tracy McIntosh travesty appears over. On Feb. 13, the former University of Pennsylvania professor and preeminent stroke and brain-trauma researcher was led from a Philadelphia courtroom to begin a 3 1/2- to 7-year prison sentence for the September 2002 sexual assault of a then-23-year-old Penn graduate student in his office at Penn. In December 2004, McIntosh pleaded no-contest to sexual assault and possession of an illegal substance in connection with the incident.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Seattle playwright Ted Sod learned he was HIV positive a dozen years ago. His response to this devastating news in Crocodile Tears is defiant, darkly funny and ultimately touching. Simon DeSoto (played by Sod himself) is a high school art teacher who faces the same fateful sentence - and a very different option in dealing with it. It is one that forces him to weigh the certainties of this world against the imponderables of the next one. The devil himself offers to banish the virus from Simon's system if he will only fulfill three tasks.
NEWS
March 21, 1987
Shame on Sports Illustrated for paying Gary McLain $40,000 for his sad tale of drug abuse and innuendo. The message is now clear that, whatever our transgressions, we can make a lot of money by telling all to the right publisher. Who says crime doesn't pay? Too many athletes, not content with their outrageously high salaries or athletic scholarships as the case may be, weep crocodile tears and are reluctant to submit to testing. Let the gullible and naive public accept the deceit and foot the bill.
NEWS
May 20, 1986
"In Fairmount Park a heritage crumbles" because historic preservationists have failed. They have jettisoned the obligation to concentrate on truly significant historic structures and sites. They wallow instead in ambience. They have turned historic preservation into a construction program. That wastrel way has diluted historic-preservation philosophy. The my-that's-nice approach has robbed first-rate historic properties of financial support. Little wonder, then, that "In Fairmount Park a heritage crumbles," as the headline in Vernon Loeb's May 11 article said.
NEWS
June 28, 2011
HOW IS driving more than 100 mph while intoxicated a "tragedy"? Ryan Dunn was famous for a show that attracted people best defined as trash. What's even more comical was that the parents of his co-star "Bam" stated he was like a son to them. Well, if that's the case, Mr. and Mrs. Bam, then you both failed as well. The real tragedy would have been if Mr. Dunn killed that innocent person, and he himself had lived. If that happened, would we see some crocodile tears from the supposed "star"?
NEWS
November 27, 1986
"Don't cry for Gene Hasenfus" (editorial, Nov. 18) was a sorry example of bias. Instead of castigating the Reagan administration you should have given serious consideration to the important issues that were trivialized, and, worse, ridiculed in the editorial. The State Department and the U.S. Embassy were not on trial in Nicaragua. Eugene Hasenfus was the accused. Whatever his motives were, and whomever he worked for, he deserved the same treatment as any other person. He was certainly entitled to due process and the right not to be subjected to a kangaroo court.
NEWS
November 18, 1986
So Eugene Hasenfus, the "cargo handler" who once plied his trade in Southeast Asia, now stands convicted of handling cargo over the jungles of Nicaragua. The verdict has been in little question since the mercenary parachuted from a crashing C-123 that had been dropping military supplies to contras trying to depose Managua's Sandinista government. But there is something pathetic - and, finally, outrageous - about the official U.S. response to Mr. Hasenfus' mission, a mission that from the ground looked a lot more like terrorism than it looked like "freedom fighting.
SPORTS
August 23, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Progress was out at the baseball talks. Name-calling was in. As owners named their new bargaining team yesterday, union head Donald Fehr called management negotiator Richard Ravitch a "hatchet man" for owners who shed "crocodile tears" for laid-off workers. Federal mediators announced talks will resume tomorrow in the first face- to-face meeting between the bargaining teams since players struck Aug. 12. But Fehr said he saw no evidence there could be progress, and Boston Red Sox chief executive officer John Harrington said when owners get to the table they will be offering the same salary-cap proposal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2011
HOW IS driving more than 100 mph while intoxicated a "tragedy"? Ryan Dunn was famous for a show that attracted people best defined as trash. What's even more comical was that the parents of his co-star "Bam" stated he was like a son to them. Well, if that's the case, Mr. and Mrs. Bam, then you both failed as well. The real tragedy would have been if Mr. Dunn killed that innocent person, and he himself had lived. If that happened, would we see some crocodile tears from the supposed "star"?
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
This week was the Philadelphia Orchestra's "middle child" program. No hot soloists or provocative premieres, but homely, obviously temporary acoustical panels framing the Verizon Hall stage. When the orchestra began the concert with Debussy's Images, everybody seemed to be saving energy for next week's Berlioz Requiem. Elsewhere, though, the program's outcome was unexpectedly wonderful. The acoustical panels reportedly aid the orchestra's ability to hear itself - and thus play better.
SPORTS
January 30, 2009 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
While praying that Wax pulls off a Wing Bowl miracle today, it's time to look inside the e-mail bag . . . I actually saw Jeff Lurie being interviewed for that article. When he got choked up and pulled out that $1,000,000 bill and blew his nose into it really . . . (sniff) . . . excuse me . . . got to me, ya know ? - Kerry Kerry, - Gonzo Just because the Eagles didn't grow up here doesn't mean they don't care. How long does your depression last when you miss out on yet another Pulitzer?
NEWS
April 30, 2008
Rude to guests My son and I drove from Montreal to catch Monday night's Flyers-Canadiens playoff game at the Wachovia Center. Your fans have many reasons to be proud of their city and team, but how they treat their guests at a sporting event is not one of them. As the game progressed, the level of threats and abuse heaped on us grew at an alarming rate. At one point, an unfortunate Habs fan had a glass of beer poured on her head, and her boyfriend thought it best for them to leave the arena.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Gerald McOscar
Pending the unlikely reversal of his sentence on appeal, the Tracy McIntosh travesty appears over. On Feb. 13, the former University of Pennsylvania professor and preeminent stroke and brain-trauma researcher was led from a Philadelphia courtroom to begin a 3 1/2- to 7-year prison sentence for the September 2002 sexual assault of a then-23-year-old Penn graduate student in his office at Penn. In December 2004, McIntosh pleaded no-contest to sexual assault and possession of an illegal substance in connection with the incident.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
WE WERE all shocked and saddened to learn of the assassination of Pakistani former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. While looking at the latest news breaking on TV and the Internet, I was exposed to many bothersome images, not the least of which was George W. Bush crying crocodile tears for the fallen prime minister from his vacation ranch. Has anyone ever bothered to ask why, after these years, President Bush has been unable to capture bin Laden? All anybody would have to do is look into the past dealings of the Bush family and see that there has been more than one piece of business completed with members of the bin Laden clan.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
CHRISTINE Flowers tells of her childhood experience with anti-Catholic bigotry (Aug.8). She fast forwards to the present, alleging that this same bigotry is alive today in the form of questions about Supreme Court nominee and Catholic John Roberts' views on abortion. I grew up as a Protestant in an all-Catholic neighborhood in the 1960s. I was told repeatedly by my friends that "the nuns" said that anyone who wasn't Catholic was going to hell. So, Christine, spare me the crocodile tears.
NEWS
February 17, 2003
RE "Romance turns into Gothic tale of death" (Feb. 11): Good story - but spare me the "she had a hard life" routine. It was no more then a lot of people. She took advantage of him just like Robert Blake's ex. If HE had done that to her and SHE shot him, it would be portrayed on Lifetime. I can see it now: "Lonely women is emotionally abused and scammed by Romeo, she shoots him in self-defense!" I'm not saying what he did was right, but, unlike her, he won't get off with a phony "battered-woman" defense.
NEWS
October 18, 2002
THERE WAS ALWAYS something buffoonish about Ira Einhorn. The pseudo-ecologist, faux writer and full-time enzyme has been, as far as we can tell, a charlatan from the start. The fact that he bamboozled so many before he skipped bail and fled Philadelphia is both a testament to his evil charm and the squishy thinking of the '60s. We live in harder times now. But not as hard as Einhorn will experience. We just have one regret now that the jury has pronounced Einhorn guilty of the murder of Helen "Holly" Maddux: His prison cell will be bigger than the trunk he stuffed his victim into.
NEWS
March 12, 2002
Ahhh, the 2002 Philadelphia Flower Show is but a pleasant scent in time now, but what a lovely prelude to the spring just around the flower bed. It will be hard to forget the yawning crocodile topiary with the shining red eyes, guarding the Burke Brothers of Glenside exhibit, "A Garden Fantasy. " The croc yawned and kids jumped, or looked twice. And how about the mother-in-law succulents growing down his spine, and the echeveria on his tongue? The exhibit also boasted weeping cherry trees, an elegant arbor of flowing forsythia, perky yellow snapdragons, sweet buttercups, and a colorful coleus.
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