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NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Textbooks teach that the Industrial Revolution in the United States began in Pawtucket, R.I. But history, according to one local grade school teacher, can be changed. The books tell it this way: Samuel Slater, the manager of a textile mill in England, immigrated to the United States in 1789. Exporting technology - even that contained between the ears - was illegal at the time, and Slater had escaped using a disguise. In 1790, Slater built from memory the first textile- spinning machinery on U.S. soil, sparking the process that would change American fortunes forever.
NEWS
May 16, 1987 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A disbarred Cherry Hill lawyer was sentenced to five years of probation yesterday on a charge of misusing more than $100,000 from the estate of his late brother. Camden Superior Court Judge Mary Ellen Talbott also ordered the disbarred lawyer, Paul S. Slotkin, to perform 300 hours of community service and pay an undetermined amount of restitution. Slotkin pleaded guilty last month to misapplication of entrusted property for misusing funds from the estate of his brother Barney Slotkin, who died in 1979.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Wolf, the front-runner among Democrats hoping to challenge Gov. Corbett, has built his campaign on a simple and compelling business success story, which he posted on the "About Tom" tab at the front of his website, and reinforced in his speeches and ads ever since he announced his campaign to supporters last year: He is a successful businessman, rich enough to put at least $10 million of his own money into his campaign - even after saving his...
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | By Bridget Mount, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer Correspondent Bill Frischling contributed to this report
Ruling that zoning, not freedom of expression, was at issue, a Delaware County judge yesterday upheld his previous decision that blocks topless dancing at the Pulsations nightclub in Concord Township. Kenneth R. Schuster and Joel Friedman, both representing Pulsations owner Concord Ranch Inc., argued at a hearing yesterday that Judge Joseph P. Cronin Jr.'s preliminary injunction Wednesday against topless dancing at the club denied freedom of speech. In denying the motion, Cronin said yesterday that his earlier order simply involved enforcement of Concord's zoning ordinance.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | By MICHAEL DAYS, Daily News Staff Writer
The city has elected to stand firm in its position that the City Hall Annex is safe for workers, prompting a call for "guerrilla action" by union members employed at the asbestos-plagued building. Managing Director James S. White said during a press conference last night that the city continues to believe the annex is safe for workers while the asbestos cleanup operation is under way there. "There is no evidence to support a determination of a health risk," White said. But Thomas Paine Cronin, president of white-collar District Council 47 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, labeled city officials a "bunch of liars" who are "incompetent, stupid and criminal.
NEWS
November 3, 1994 | By Angela Paik and Suzette Hackney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
The lights went out last night at Pulsations nightclub in Concord - for the topless dancers and everybody else. Delaware County Judge Joseph P. Cronin Jr. late yesterday found Pulsations owner James Gorman and Concord Ranch Inc. in contempt for violating his Oct. 5 injunction banning topless dancing. He ordered the club closed pending decisions by the township zoning officer. In an interpretation broader than imagined, Cronin wrote that his Oct. 5 order banned not only topless dancing, but any entertainment not approved under current zoning laws.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | By Bridget Mount and Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Pulsations' topless dancers and protesters, long at loggerheads, will find some common ground tonight when both will be inactive. Delaware County Judge Joseph P. Cronin Jr. granted a preliminary injunction yesterday, blocking the topless dancers from performing at the Concord nightspot. Cronin ruled that Concord Ranch Inc., Pulsations' owner, had "knowingly and intentionally" violated the Concord Township zoning ordinance since August, when the company introduced topless dancing at the club.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Steve Esack, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Ellen Cronin, retirement does not mean sitting in front of the television catching up on soap operas. For this former Hillcrest Elementary School teacher, retirement means research and learning. "Ever since I started teaching in Upper Darby, I've been interested in local history," said Cronin, who retired two years ago. Cronin and her fellow volunteers from the Upper Darby Historical Society have been pouring over maps, deeds, wills, census reports, and tax records since winning a grant from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in August of last year.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
The Ridley Township Municipal Building's upper-level conference room had all the theatrics of a Broadway backstage, with actors helping each other adjust their costumes, taking yet another peek at the script and nervously awaiting the curtain call. It came at 8 p.m. sharp Wednesday, as the nine members of the township Board of Commissioners, the township solicitor and various municipal employees gave one final tug to their knee breeches and filed into Garling Hall on the lower level.
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SPORTS
March 13, 2016 | By Tom Reifsnyder, Staff Writer
HERSHEY - The lights inside Hershey's Giant Center often shine brightest on those who have seen them before. With six mats, hundreds of wrestlers and thousands of fans, the PIAA Class 3A wrestling championships present a daunting challenge for any first-time qualifier looking to make a mark in the country's most competitive state wrestling tournament. Last year, Upper Darby junior Colin Cronin was fresh meat, and he knew it. After failing to place at districts as a freshman, Cronin posted a 36-3 sophomore record while placing first at sectionals, districts and regionals before going 0-2 in his first state tournament appearance.
NEWS
April 5, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Wolf, the front-runner among Democrats hoping to challenge Gov. Corbett, has built his campaign on a simple and compelling business success story, which he posted on the "About Tom" tab at the front of his website, and reinforced in his speeches and ads ever since he announced his campaign to supporters last year: He is a successful businessman, rich enough to put at least $10 million of his own money into his campaign - even after saving his...
NEWS
September 10, 2010
Rich Cronin, 36, whose band LFO sang the breezy summer hit "Summer Girls" whose lyrics boosted Abercrombie & Fitch, has died after struggling with health setbacks, including leukemia and a stroke. Mr. Cronin - who cowrote "Summer Girls," LFO's biggest hit - died in a Boston hospital Wednesday, former bandmate Brad Fischetti said. "Last summer, when we did our reunion tour, he was certainly having health problems, but he was cancer-free at that time," Fischetti said Thursday. Mr. Cronin's manager, Melissa Holland, said he died of complications from leukemia.
NEWS
January 8, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph P. Cronin Jr. was elected president judge of Delaware County Court yesterday. Cronin, 61, of Ridley Township, replaces Edward J. Zetusky Jr., 70, who retired to senior judge status at the start of this year. An official announcement is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. today at the courthouse in Media. Also yesterday, Linda A. Cartisano, a resident of Chester City and its longtime solicitor, was elected chairwoman of the Delaware County Council by the five-member body. The Inquirer learned of Cronin's election during a call to Zetusky's chambers.
SPORTS
January 2, 2008 | Daily News Wire Services
Mick Cronin's rebuilding plan at Cincinnati appears to be ahead of schedule. Deonta Vaughn and John Williamson scored 13 points each as the visiting Bearcats edged longtime rival Louisville yesterday, 58-57. Jerry Smith led the Cardinals with 17 points and David Padgett added 13 points and four rebounds in his return from a fractured kneecap, but Edgar Sosa's 18-footer with 2 seconds left was partially blocked and Terrence Williams' tip-in bounced out at the buzzer as the Bearcats (6-7, 1-0 Big East)
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Justin Cronin, the Philadelphia novelist and La Salle University professor who won the PEN/Hemingway Award earlier this year for his first novel, Mary and O'Neil (Dial Press), has picked up another prestigious national literary prize: a $35,000 Whiting Writers Award. Last night at the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, Robert Belknap, president of the Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation, announced its annual list of 10 writers "of exceptional talent and promise" who will receive the no-strings-attached money to support their work.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | By Steve Esack, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Ellen Cronin, retirement does not mean sitting in front of the television catching up on soap operas. For this former Hillcrest Elementary School teacher, retirement means research and learning. "Ever since I started teaching in Upper Darby, I've been interested in local history," said Cronin, who retired two years ago. Cronin and her fellow volunteers from the Upper Darby Historical Society have been pouring over maps, deeds, wills, census reports, and tax records since winning a grant from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in August of last year.
LIVING
October 1, 2000 | By Murray Dubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Paine Cronin had quite a summer. Full of "life-changing experiences," is how the union leader of white-collar city workers describes it: "I'll remember this summer. " He ticks off what happened: physically hurt, professionally betrayed, happily married. More ups and downs than the speed bag he punches in his Roxborough home. President of District Council 47 since 1980 - the longest tenure of any city employees' leader in town - Cronin, 57, is pugnacious, principled and provocative.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The resolution of the city's labor dispute erupted into a bitter, fratricidal war yesterday among AFSCME union members, with the white-collar union president calling blue-collar union leaders and international union leaders "sellouts of working people. " "We were treated like dirt," AFSCME District Council 47 President Tom Cronin raged, "and it will never, never be forgotten. " While the venom of Cronin's outburst was striking, the underlying conflict between the two unions is old and widely known among city unionists.
NEWS
March 4, 2000 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
In addition to strange bedfellows, politics can sometimes create strange enemies. The construction union members who, earlier in the week, booed and heckled three members of City Council and the city controller, yesterday unleashed their wrath on fellow union members, hooting and hollering so loudly that Council President Anna Verna shut down the hearing to clear the room. Tom Cronin, president of AFSCME District Council 47, the city's white-collar workers, had come to urge Council not to spend money on stadiums until the four municipal unions have new contracts.
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