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Crop

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SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Association of Racing Commissioners International has developed guidelines regarding racing crop construction and use. The crop is to be used only for safety, correction, and encouragement, and in a manner consistent with the jockey's best efforts to win. The jockey is to show the horse the crop and give it time to respond before striking the horse. After using the crop, the jockey is to give the horse time to respond before using it again. The crop is to be applied only to the horse's shoulder or hindquarters, not its face or flanks.
SPORTS
March 18, 1992 | MICHAEL MERCANTI/ DAILY NEWS
The Markward Club honored its scholastic basketball award winners yesterday. With club secretary Andy Dougherty, they are (from left) Central's Tyrone Tyson, the club's choice as the Public League's top player; Penn Charter's Tim Krug, the city's top senior player; and Cardinal Dougherty's Cuttino Mobley, the Catholic League's top player.
NEWS
May 1, 2005 | By Daniel Hoffman
The mice rot in their tunnels in a field Where phantom harvesters cut phantom grain. A poisoned acre grows a poisoned yield. Here skinny children stretch their hands in vain. Their swollen bellies hurt, and are not healed. A phantom blade has harvested their grain. Night after night I see this land annealed By draughts of fire and death that fall like rain. One poisoned acre poisons all the field. These are my crops. We harrow my domain, The one who pays counts all for which he's billed.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By Jane Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Finally, it's time to go all out and get the rest of the summer crops into the garden before the end of the month. Let's start with cucumbers and pumpkins. Cucumbers are finicky when it comes to soil temperatures, and the seeds will just rot if you plant them directly in the ground before the soil temperature is consistently about 70 degrees Fahrenheit. For this reason, it's best to start transplants from seed in early spring, or, if you haven't, to purchase small plants at a garden center.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
For years, Ann and John Swan's Chester County garden has been one of my favorites because of the Swans' emphasis on vegetables. Onions, peppers, tomatoes and all kinds of lettuce and other leaf crops are beautifully grown with hardly a weed in sight, and there are always several new varieties under test. Long-season production is a hallmark of the Swan garden. Here are some thoughts from John Swan to encourage you to keep your own crops going a little longer this season: ONIONS.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Edward Colimore and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pink blossoms started showing up in March, long before their usual appearance. Now, at orchards across New Jersey and Pennsylvania, peaches are being harvested a full two to three weeks ahead of schedule. "People are excited about everything being early," said Eric Johnson, co-owner of Johnson's Corner Farm in Medford, where the harvest began Saturday. "Typically, we'd begin picking in the third week of June. " Not this year, not after the warmest first four months since the start of official temperature records in 1874.
FOOD
August 16, 1989 | By Deborah Scoblionkov, Special to The Inquirer Inquirer staff writer Marilynn Marter contributed to this article
At a time of the year when fat, red, luscious Jersey tomatoes are usually cheap and plentiful, they're not. Prices are erratic and quality is sporadic. Although good, fresh tomatoes can be found on roadside stands and in some supermarkets, there are a lot of disappointing tomatoes around. The Super Fresh market at 10th and South Streets in Philadelphia, for example, hasn't stocked any Jersey tomatoes this year because of "poor quality," according to its produce manager, Jack Fitts.
NEWS
April 11, 1989 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Great billows of white smoke can be seen the minute a car turns off Route 153 onto a long, narrow dirt road that crooks like an elbow into the center of Ed Lewis' valley, still brown with winter. The smoke means that Lewis is sugaring, just as he has for 36 years. It pours from the gaping hole in the roof of what once was a toolshed and now is his sugarhouse. Inside boils the sweet warmth of maple sap becoming syrup - the year's first harvest, the surest sign of spring. But inside the sugarhouse there is also grave concern.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
MEDFORD Week after week, the crowds have been showing up at Johnson's Corner Farm in Medford with one goal in mind: finding the perfect pumpkin. Families and schoolchildren exit buses and cars for tractor-drawn hayrides that take them to sprawling fields dotted with plump orange orbs. Their arrival is a rite of autumn for farmer Pete Johnson, who is marking what may be his best pumpkin season ever. "We have a phenomenal crop," said Johnson. "The rains were beneficial; they put size on the pumpkins.
NEWS
July 2, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIDDLEBURG, Pa. - A Snyder County company that makes potato chips is having trouble because of the weather. Normally, Ira Middleswarth & Son gets eight tractor-trailer loads of potatoes from its supplier each week. Middleswarth Vice President Jeff Golf says his company is now getting only four. Golf says lack of rain is causing low potato yields throughout the South. Floods in the Midwest are causing trouble for the crop there. He's hoping to get potatoes from southern Virginia and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.
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SPORTS
August 30, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
Nobody talks about Devin Leary's arm. Timber Creek coach Rob Hinson mentions Leary's unheralded athletic ability and leadership qualities. Chargers wide receiver Ezrah Archie touts Leary's work ethic and understanding of the game. Leary spends most of his time crediting his offensive linemen, receivers and coaches for putting him in position to become the most prolific passer in the history of South Jersey football. But Leary's right arm deserves some credit, too. It's the right arm that made him a youth-league legend when he threw for about 50 touchdown passes as an eighth grader.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, STAFF WRITER
Two farms in Montgomery County have just been preserved in perpetuity under an Agricultural Land Preservation Program, the county has announced. The farms, a 54-acre crop and horse operation in New Hanover Township, owned by George E. Leidig Jr. and Eleanor Vallone, and a 50-acre crop farm in Salford Township, owned by J. Ladaan and Anne D. Moyer, will continue be used as pasture or to produce food. To date 9,230 acres on 157 farms have been preserved in the county through the program, which purchases agricultural easements from the farms.
SPORTS
November 23, 2015 | BY ED BARKOWITZ, Daily News Staff Writer barkowe@phillynews.com
OFFICIALLY, Jordan Matthews is a member of the Philadelphia Eagles. He goes to work each day at the NovaCare Complex. Dresses in a locker with Malcolm Jenkins on one side and Jon Dorenbos on another. Just across the way are Byron Maxwell and Bennie Logan. But Matthews also belongs to another club that is growing more and more prestigious each week. The wide receivers drafted in the class of 2014 continue to thrive at an impressive pace. "They've come in and had more production than any class I can remember," said Jenkins, who is in his seventh season.
NEWS
November 16, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
There's a new movement changing the landscape of our neighborhood dining scene. And it's flowing on draft at an independent brewpub near you. With the craft-beer movement doubling its share of the U.S. market over the last five years, most Americans now live within 10 miles of a brewery. In the beer-savvy Philadelphia region, people are even closer. Increasingly, those breweries are taking the form of brewpubs, the number of which has quadrupled over the last four years in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
August 3, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pedaling wildly along her block in Chester, Jade Mills approached the chain-link fence, dropped her bike, and sprinted toward a picnic table lined with bins of fruit. "What's this?" the 5-year-old said, plopping a plump cherry into her mouth as she wiggled onto a bench alongside her friends. "I've never had one of these before. " "It's a raspberry," replied one friend. "No, it's a crop," said another. "What's a crop?" Mills asked. "A crop, remember, is another word for plant," answered Terrence Topping-Brown, a 24-year-old who, for the afternoon, would be kids' mentor, their teacher, their playmate.
SPORTS
May 14, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
The Association of Racing Commissioners International has developed guidelines regarding racing crop construction and use. The crop is to be used only for safety, correction, and encouragement, and in a manner consistent with the jockey's best efforts to win. The jockey is to show the horse the crop and give it time to respond before striking the horse. After using the crop, the jockey is to give the horse time to respond before using it again. The crop is to be applied only to the horse's shoulder or hindquarters, not its face or flanks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2015 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The cropped top and matching pencil skirt are staging a comeback so sleek that it's surely on the way to silhouette-of-the-year status. Nearly every runway designer or private label took a stab this spring at this version of matchy-matchy: Alexander Wang created a trés sexy version for Balenciaga that featured a ribcage-grazing midriff in black leather and a matching sheer skirt. Humberto Leon and Carol Lim dropped their cropped tops to the waist for Kenzo. Fashioned from white eyelet fabric that's patterned to look like smiling emojis, these skirt-and-top ensembles are perfect for happy, summer days.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, David Fleming hasn't had much trouble finding workers for his fourth-generation family business, Shady Brook Farm in Yardley. But then again, Fleming and his family aren't taking any chances. Six years ago, they opened a farmers' market at Delaware Valley College, a school near Doylestown that is traditionally strong in agriculture. "It was definitely access to the talent," Fleming said. On Monday, Fleming talked about farm hiring as part of an employers' panel at the college's student center, the kickoff site of Bucks County AgConnect.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015
INDIANAPOLIS - Evaluating quarterbacks never has been easy. In the past 40 years, there have been far more early-round busts at the position than success stories. But the popularity of the spread offense in the college game and all of the bells and whistles that go with it have turned the imperfect science of judging quarterback flesh into something akin to nuclear physics. "It's getting harder and harder [to evaluate them]," Seattle Seahawks general manager John Schneider said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2015 | By Diana Burgwyn, For The Inquirer
Nothing brings tears to opera lovers' eyes more copiously than the story of the consumptive seamstress Mimì and her impoverished poet lover Rodolfo in Puccini's ever-popular La Bohème . The Academy of Vocal Arts has seen more than its fair share of graduates break audience hearts in these roles, and the current production, directed by David Gately in a traditional setting, brought forth the latest candidates. As Mimì, soprano Marina Costa-Jackson revealed a large, sumptuous voice, secure throughout its range and with carrying power that might well lead to heavier roles in the Puccini/Verdi canon.
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