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Crop

NEWS
October 9, 1994 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
Crop art - the planting and plowing of crops in artistic patterns - has made the leap from agri-artistic oddity to tourist attraction in southern New York's Dutchess County. Through the end of this month, the county is promoting 14 examples of crop art on county farms and laying claim to the title of crop-art capital. The field art ranges in size from the 1/2-acre "Daisy the Cow" to the 18-acre "Green Apple With Worm. " Some of the patterns can be viewed from the ground; others are best seen from the air. One of the county's attractions is the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome, from which biplane rides are offered.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As a prime crop of New Jersey peaches rolls into markets around the region, Gloucester County is preparing to showcase these fuzzy fruits that over the years have brought millions of agriculture dollars to the area. Along with several varieties of the fruit, peach lovers will find fresh peach ice cream and peach cobbler at the New Jersey Peach Festival in Mullica Hill Thursday through Sunday. "Peaches are a large commodity and large part of the community," said John Rigolizzo, president of the New Jersey Farm Bureau.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Lea Sitton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was Reggie Beauchamp who thought up the idea of topping off the Billy Penn statue for a special event - and that was not the World Series. The year was 1952. The stunt was just one of many that Beauchamp, then director of special events for the Evening Bulletin, concocted to catch people's attention. He wanted to remind Philadelphians of Fire Prevention Week. So he enlisted a city engineer, and the two climbed up City Hall, to the brim of Penn's hat, and topped it with a nine-foot firefighter helmet.
NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The name has changed, and the methods are different. But the purpose remains the same. When the Octoraro Farmers' Club - named for the creek that flows through the area - was formed in 1856, the club's constitution outlined the purpose for its 15 members: "promoting our Agricultural Interests and Social Fellowship. " Today it's called by a somewhat more official-sounding name - the Octorara Young Farmers Association - since joining the Pennsylvania YFA 20 years ago. But it still follows the mandate set down 133 years ago: "Experiment with breeding, raising and feeding stock . . . make records of crop production and experiment with various kinds of fertilizer on all kinds of crops.
NEWS
July 22, 1988 | By Daniel LeDuc and Elizabeth Hallowell, Special to The Inquirer
With farmers' crops dying and their profits disappearing, the governors of New Jersey and Delaware yesterday asked the federal government to declare their states drought disaster areas. The declaration, if granted, would make qualified farmers eligible for low- interest loans to help offset their losses from the drought, which agriculture officials estimated would exceed $118 million in New Jersey and $37 million in Delaware. Pennsylvania officials continue to watch the state's dry conditions, monitoring twice-weekly crop reports, but have not asked for disaster assistance.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clusters of apples hang heavy, ripening red and round here in Adams County, Pennsylvania's apple-growing heartland. They look good, and they taste good. The dry weather has made the sweet ones sweeter and the tart ones tarter. But, say apple experts in the nation's fifth-largest apple-producing state, there just aren't enough of them. Blame the cool, damp spring. The bees stayed home in late April and early May. And so, experts say, not enough apple blossoms were pollinated.
NEWS
July 9, 1988 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
This won't be remembered only as the year that drought came fierce and sudden to the Prickett farm on Fostertown Road in Lumberton. This will also be remembered as the year that 12-year-old Charlie Prickett did a man's work, hauling aluminum irrigation pipe across the cracked dirt and wrenching open sprinkler spigots on his daddy's potato farm in 95-degree heat for a buck- fifty an hour, every day, seven days a week, from 8 in the morning till close...
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | BY FRANCESCA CHAPMAN Daily News wire services, the New York Post, USA Today and the Washington Post contributed to this report
Robert De Niro and long-ago girlfriend Toukie Smith, reportedly bickering over custody arrangements for their year-old twin sons, may destroy whatever little friendship remains between them. The two were a couple on the New York scene for years, but had been estranged a good long time when De Niro and Smith decided to provide the test-tube essentials and have a surrogate mom bear them a child. Bob was expected to bow out of the picture after a child was conceived. But since the couple was presented with beautiful twin boys, Julian and Kendrick, a year ago, nobody wants to take a back seat.
SPORTS
November 13, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
The Cleveland Browns are being beaten and beaten down by coach Eric Mangini. That's Jamal Lewis' take. Frustrated by another losing season, the veteran running back blasted Cleveland's first-year coach yesterday, saying Mangini is pushing his players too hard in practice. But Lewis, one of Cleveland's six captains, has not taken his complaints to Mangini. "Hey, this is his show, it's not mine," said Lewis, who intends to retire after the season. "It's his show, it's not my show.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | By Sonja Hillgren, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Associated Press contributed to this article
The Senate yesterday passed a $3.9 billion drought-assistance bill, the most generous drought relief ever committed to help American farmers. The measure passed 92-0. The House is expected to approve it today; President Reagan is expected to sign it by the end of the week. Lawmakers began working on the bill when the devastating effect of the worst drought in 50 years became evident two months ago. One month ago, the Agriculture Department estimated that the grain crop had been slashed by 24 percent.
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