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Crossroads

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The popularity of the compact disc has prompted a rush to reissue material that appeals to the baby-boom rock fans who are the medium's primary pop consumers. For the record industry, the recycling of older material is akin to found money, in that the original production cost has long been amortized and the remastering of an analog tape for a single compact disc costs a scant $5,000. Crossroads, an exhaustive compilation (five LPs or cassettes, four CDs) chronicling the career of Eric Clapton, keynotes a related trend toward lavish reissues that cover the giants of rock and roll.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Exton crossroads, Chester County's merchandising magnet, has pulled in not one but five proposals to build "big box" retail stores. Plans have been submitted to West Whiteland for a new discount store, two discount membership clubs and two new home building supply stores - each with 100,000 square feet or more of retail space. But that's not all. If they are built, the new Wal-Mart, Sam's Club, Hechinger's, Home Depot, and a yet unidentified fifth store - a discount membership club - will each be flanked by "small box" retailers.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Show us a traffic jam, say retailers, and we will show you a successful shopping area. By those standards, the Exton crossroads can't stand much more success. At peak traffic hours, the junction of Routes 100 and 30 carries four times the traffic for which it was designed. Signs crowding the intersection tout fast food, hot tubs, gasoline stations, historic homesteads, condominiums, retail strips and automobile showrooms. Within a two-mile radius of the crossroads, drivers are told to merge, yield, slow and stop as they guide their vehicles through hourglass-shaped ribbons of road that erratically widen and narrow between two and six lanes.
SPORTS
December 7, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Goalie Ray Emery is imploding, the offense has virtually vanished, and the team is playing with alarming indifference. Welcome to the crossroads of the Flyers' 2009-10 season. "There's a long way to go in all three zones . . . and a lot of work" that's needed, said new coach Peter Laviolette after the Flyers, looking as if they were still in shock because of the John Stevens firing, were embarrassed by powerful Washington, 8-2, on Saturday. It was Laviolette's Flyers debut.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By Michael Parks, Los Angeles Times
Huddled together against the cold rains of the Southern Hemisphere's fast- approaching winter, the Temba family - mother, father, four children - had the forlorn look of refugees anywhere. Their home, a three-room shack of wood, tin and plastic but with the luxury of real glass windows, was among those destroyed in a week of fighting last month that left 48 dead at the Crossroads squatter settlement outside Cape Town. Sam Temba's head is still wrapped in dirty gauze bandages after a rifle bullet grazed him as he tried to salvage some of the family's meager possessions from the shack.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Crossroads School Golf Classic Committee held a reception Sunday in an unusual place: the offices of Bob DiPuppo, located in the Walnut Hill Plaza on South Warner Road in Wayne. DiPuppo and his wife, Suzan, who live in Downingtown, are vice chairs of the committee headed by Irene Horstmann Hannan of Ardmore. The third annual fund-raising event will be held at 11 a.m. April 25 at Chester Valley Golf Club in Malvern; it will be the first outside event held in Chester Valley's new clubhouse.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Matthew Manion
From my work with the Catholic Leadership Institute to my large, Irish Catholic family of 10, I have seen and felt anger, despair and frustration over the many challenges facing the Catholic Church. At times I have been completely overwhelmed by the enormity of the challenge to build a stronger church until I read a quote from St. Augustine: "Hope has two daughters: anger and courage; anger at the way things are, and courage to see that they do not remain the way they are. " Despite troubling events, I'd like to assure Catholics across the Philadelphia region that although the church may stand at the crossroads, there is hope.
REAL_ESTATE
September 20, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imperial Towers, Philadelphia Minutes from the Schuylkill Expressway, along Conshohocken Avenue just off City Avenue on the city side, a row of apartment buildings sits at the crossroads of the city and the suburbs. One of them is Imperial Towers. "I had two weeks to find a place, and location was important," said Joel Baker, a medical student who settled there. "When I walked in, I felt safe, and everything looked to be in good order, and clean. " Huma Malik, a recent medical school graduate, and her husband, Ali, an anesthesiology fellow at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, recently moved from Manhattan to Imperial Towers.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
In both her professional and personal life, Carol Jewitt believes in being prepared. A nurse manager at Norristown State Hospital, Jewitt recently survived a layoff of managers by the state. "I thought there's always a possibility that this will happen again . . . I kind of realized life is very unpredictable and one must always be prepared for unforeseen events," said Jewitt, 56, of Phoenixville. With that in mind, Jewitt became one of 21 women who signed up for the eight-week Winner's Circle workshop offered in June at the Women's Resource Center in Wayne.
SPORTS
January 4, 1988 | By TED SILARY, Daily News Sports Writer
Luckily for Archbishop Wood, Marc Schaller is permitted to produce much more often as a basketball player than he is as sports editor of the school newspaper. It seems that Wood's paper, "Crossroads," is one of those now-you-see-it, but-you-won't-again-for-a-long-while deals. "We just put out our before-Christmas edition," Schaller said yesterday, "but supposedly, there might be a three-month layoff until the next one. "By the time that happens, the basketball story will be a season recap.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Shortly after Mauritanian vocalist Noura Mint Seymali stepped to the microphone in West Philadelphia on Sunday night, it became clear just how special the closing event of Crossroads Music's 2014-15 concert season would be. As the full-bodied electric bass of Ousmane Touré and the drumming of Philly's own Matthew Tinari began to pump behind her, Seymali delivered trilling and thrilling lines of exotic vocalization. Her confident control of melisma was impressive; her youthful power was well-measured (although it did require some quick sound-mix adjustment so she wouldn't overwhelm everything)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Alexander Danta curled his frame around a cluttered wooden table in his Jewelers' Row workshop to inspect his latest handiwork, a diamond-and-ruby wedding band that nested in his meaty palm like a newborn chick. Raising the delicate ring to the window, he tipped it slightly to catch the light, revealing an acanthus vine he had just etched on the side, perhaps a centimeter wide and sharp as a line of type. Danta is a master engraver, among the last in Philadelphia to work exclusively with hand tools, and his studio was the custom-made ring's latest stop on its journey through the Jewelry Trades Building at Eighth and Sansom Streets, a six-story beehive filled with designers, casters, polishers, and stone-setters.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 15 years in Morocco, Steve and Judi Bowman wanted to return home to a diverse community in the United States. So they settled in Upper Darby. The couple renovated a building across from the township building and opened it last year as Five Points Coffee. But Five Points is more than a coffee shop. The Bowmans also started a nonprofit organization, with a vision of serving international students, immigrants, and refugees. Their shop has become a regular meeting place for English conversation groups for nonnative speakers, a local church's SAT tutoring, and the township's multicultural committee.
NEWS
November 25, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summer ended on a sour note at the Convention Center. And the forecast for bookings is not good. Three big trade shows - for coin collectors, lighting suppliers, and health-care and biotech companies - are not returning to Philadelphia. The big complaint: Philadelphia is a "hassle," said Jack Ferguson, president of the Philadelphia Convention & Visitors Bureau, which lines up shows for the center. In surveys, he said, customers cited problems with labor costs and "jurisdictional issues" - and the balkanized union work rules for who does what on the convention floor.
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philadelphia has opened most of the new concert halls, theaters, and other arts spaces it set out to build in the culture boom of the past two decades. Now, who pays the piper? If this were Europe, the operating budgets of a Kimmel Center, Please Touch Museum, and Barnes Foundation would be covered largely through government subsidies. But here, we rely on philanthropy and ticket sales. And more than ever, arts groups must chase the populist (and fickle) ticket buyer while accommodating philanthropists with strongly expressed agendas.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By Sameer N. Yacoub, Associated Press
BAGHDAD - Iraqi soldiers backed by tanks retook control of a Sunni town north of Baghdad on Friday after gunmen withdrew without a fight, although violence erupted at three Sunni mosques and clerics called for the formation of a tribal army to protect Sunni cities. The Sunni gunmen had seized Suleiman Beg on Thursday after a firefight with security forces, one in a string of incidents that have killed more than 170 people in a spate of violence and clashes in Sunni Muslim towns in western and northern Iraq during the last four days.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My boyfriend of three years proposed to me 10 months ago. I wasn't ready; he's been patient. He's now eager to know one way or the other and neither of us wants to waste more time (early 30s), but I am torn. I feel like he is my soul mate and we connect on an otherworldly level. But I hesitate to commit because I am religious and he does not want to participate. I am also very spiritual and have a hard time saying yes to a life where I know I will not grow and connect spiritually/religiously with my spouse.
NEWS
November 1, 2012
DEAR HARRY: I have 11 percent of my pay going into my employer's 401(k) plan. It is spread out roughly evenly in three high-risk, high-reward funds. Over the last 10 years, the return has been about 10 percent. I'm 46 years old, and I'll be eligible to retire in 2022 with a full pension. Realistically, I probably will work until 2026. My 401(k) balance is about $165,000. I now am able to open a Roth IRA and also to transfer my 401(k) to a Roth. I am married with four boys (ages 22, 13, 11 and 8)
SPORTS
September 14, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Every NFL schedule includes significant crossroads games, although they often are obvious only when viewed through the rearview mirror. In the case of the Eagles' home opener Sunday against the Baltimore Ravens, the crossroads is plain to see through the windshield. It couldn't be more clearly marked or better lit. This is not a make-or-break game - it's still too early in the season for that - but by Sunday evening the Eagles will be on one of two very different roads. They will be 2-0, with last week's agita relieved by a good win against a tough contender.
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