CollectionsCrossroads
IN THE NEWS

Crossroads

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1988 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
The popularity of the compact disc has prompted a rush to reissue material that appeals to the baby-boom rock fans who are the medium's primary pop consumers. For the record industry, the recycling of older material is akin to found money, in that the original production cost has long been amortized and the remastering of an analog tape for a single compact disc costs a scant $5,000. Crossroads, an exhaustive compilation (five LPs or cassettes, four CDs) chronicling the career of Eric Clapton, keynotes a related trend toward lavish reissues that cover the giants of rock and roll.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Exton crossroads, Chester County's merchandising magnet, has pulled in not one but five proposals to build "big box" retail stores. Plans have been submitted to West Whiteland for a new discount store, two discount membership clubs and two new home building supply stores - each with 100,000 square feet or more of retail space. But that's not all. If they are built, the new Wal-Mart, Sam's Club, Hechinger's, Home Depot, and a yet unidentified fifth store - a discount membership club - will each be flanked by "small box" retailers.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Show us a traffic jam, say retailers, and we will show you a successful shopping area. By those standards, the Exton crossroads can't stand much more success. At peak traffic hours, the junction of Routes 100 and 30 carries four times the traffic for which it was designed. Signs crowding the intersection tout fast food, hot tubs, gasoline stations, historic homesteads, condominiums, retail strips and automobile showrooms. Within a two-mile radius of the crossroads, drivers are told to merge, yield, slow and stop as they guide their vehicles through hourglass-shaped ribbons of road that erratically widen and narrow between two and six lanes.
SPORTS
December 7, 2009 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Goalie Ray Emery is imploding, the offense has virtually vanished, and the team is playing with alarming indifference. Welcome to the crossroads of the Flyers' 2009-10 season. "There's a long way to go in all three zones . . . and a lot of work" that's needed, said new coach Peter Laviolette after the Flyers, looking as if they were still in shock because of the John Stevens firing, were embarrassed by powerful Washington, 8-2, on Saturday. It was Laviolette's Flyers debut.
NEWS
June 15, 1986 | By Michael Parks, Los Angeles Times
Huddled together against the cold rains of the Southern Hemisphere's fast- approaching winter, the Temba family - mother, father, four children - had the forlorn look of refugees anywhere. Their home, a three-room shack of wood, tin and plastic but with the luxury of real glass windows, was among those destroyed in a week of fighting last month that left 48 dead at the Crossroads squatter settlement outside Cape Town. Sam Temba's head is still wrapped in dirty gauze bandages after a rifle bullet grazed him as he tried to salvage some of the family's meager possessions from the shack.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Crossroads School Golf Classic Committee held a reception Sunday in an unusual place: the offices of Bob DiPuppo, located in the Walnut Hill Plaza on South Warner Road in Wayne. DiPuppo and his wife, Suzan, who live in Downingtown, are vice chairs of the committee headed by Irene Horstmann Hannan of Ardmore. The third annual fund-raising event will be held at 11 a.m. April 25 at Chester Valley Golf Club in Malvern; it will be the first outside event held in Chester Valley's new clubhouse.
NEWS
August 30, 2006 | By Matthew Manion
From my work with the Catholic Leadership Institute to my large, Irish Catholic family of 10, I have seen and felt anger, despair and frustration over the many challenges facing the Catholic Church. At times I have been completely overwhelmed by the enormity of the challenge to build a stronger church until I read a quote from St. Augustine: "Hope has two daughters: anger and courage; anger at the way things are, and courage to see that they do not remain the way they are. " Despite troubling events, I'd like to assure Catholics across the Philadelphia region that although the church may stand at the crossroads, there is hope.
SPORTS
August 15, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even after he tested positive for a banned drug three years ago and was suspended for a year, Antonio Tarver did not believe his boxing career was over. "I admit that there were some doubts," Tarver said. "I mean, who wouldn't? But I always felt inside that there was more waiting for me. " While the odds are long, he may be right. A 1996 Olympic bronze medalist, Tarver, 46, still hopes to become the oldest fighter to win the heavyweight championship. Tarver (31-6, 22 knockouts) began his professional career at the Blue Horizon in 1997.
REAL_ESTATE
September 20, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Imperial Towers, Philadelphia Minutes from the Schuylkill Expressway, along Conshohocken Avenue just off City Avenue on the city side, a row of apartment buildings sits at the crossroads of the city and the suburbs. One of them is Imperial Towers. "I had two weeks to find a place, and location was important," said Joel Baker, a medical student who settled there. "When I walked in, I felt safe, and everything looked to be in good order, and clean. " Huma Malik, a recent medical school graduate, and her husband, Ali, an anesthesiology fellow at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, recently moved from Manhattan to Imperial Towers.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, Special to The Inquirer
In both her professional and personal life, Carol Jewitt believes in being prepared. A nurse manager at Norristown State Hospital, Jewitt recently survived a layoff of managers by the state. "I thought there's always a possibility that this will happen again . . . I kind of realized life is very unpredictable and one must always be prepared for unforeseen events," said Jewitt, 56, of Phoenixville. With that in mind, Jewitt became one of 21 women who signed up for the eight-week Winner's Circle workshop offered in June at the Women's Resource Center in Wayne.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The scale of the carnage in the Civil War required radical changes to the United States' medical infrastructure. In antebellum America, it was not to hospitals that infirm individuals would often turn. Hospitals, as modernly conceived, were rare and primarily for the indigent and insane. The horrid battles following the outbreak of the war, however, convinced Army administrators that this loose network was inadequate for battlefield casualties measured in the tens of thousands. Philadelphia's tradition of medical education and its location at the vertices of several railroads brought nearly 157,000 wounded soldiers and sailors through its hospitals during the war. The city boasted two of the largest military sick bays in the country, including the 3,000-bed Satterlee General Hospital - on the site of present-day Clark Park.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Claire Sasko, Inquirer Staff Writer
All good things come to an end. Really good things, however, might need multiple endings. WXPN-FM's Zydeco Crossroads program, originally set to conclude with its grand finale weekend in October, will return one last time (this time for sure!) for a free " Zydeco Crossroads Dance Party" on Saturday at Union Transfer. "We knew there would be a good reaction," WXPN program director Bruce Warren said of the program. "We just didn't realize how good of a reaction there would be. " Zydeco Crossroads , a 16-month partnership between WXPN and KRVS Radio Acadie public radio in Lafayette, La., aims to raise awareness of zydeco, a fast-moving, heel-kicking, bluesy genre with southwest Louisiana roots.
SPORTS
November 20, 2015 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
DURING MY tenure in Philadelphia sports, the two athletes whose careers I have covered most extensively are Allen Iverson and Donovan McNabb. Both were here for about a decade, and I had hundreds of conversations with both - most on the record but some off. Their public personas could not have been more different. Iverson was easy to read. His finer qualities as well as his flaws were advertised in every decision he made and action he took. He never tried to hide who he was - good or bad. He lived the way he wanted and cast a look of spite at any who questioned his right to do so. "There are going to be a million people who love Allen Iverson and a million people who hate Allen Iverson," he often said.
NEWS
November 13, 2015 | Beth D'Addono, Daily News
Four months after signing a historic nuclear accord with the U.S. and other western powers, Iran now has a seat at the world political table. Many details remain to be settled, though, and since negotiations generally go better over a shared meal, what better time for Iran's complex and unique culinary culture to get the spotlight? "The nuclear accord can only bode well to introducing people to Persian culture and food, which has been obscured for years by a veil of political animosity," said Louisa Shafia, the Philadelphia-born author of The New Persian Kitchen (Ten Speed Press)
SPORTS
August 15, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even after he tested positive for a banned drug three years ago and was suspended for a year, Antonio Tarver did not believe his boxing career was over. "I admit that there were some doubts," Tarver said. "I mean, who wouldn't? But I always felt inside that there was more waiting for me. " While the odds are long, he may be right. A 1996 Olympic bronze medalist, Tarver, 46, still hopes to become the oldest fighter to win the heavyweight championship. Tarver (31-6, 22 knockouts) began his professional career at the Blue Horizon in 1997.
NEWS
August 8, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
As she loaded groceries into the back of her car last Friday morning, Melissa Rudolph said she would not particularly miss the parking lot - or negotiating the aisles - at the Whole Foods store in Wynnewood. "This parking lot is tiny, and the store is cramped," said Rudolph, 28, of Conshohocken. After two decades at that location in Lower Merion Township, the grocery chain is preparing to move into a store nearly three times as large - and just around the corner on Lancaster Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By David R. Stampone, For The Inquirer
Shortly after Mauritanian vocalist Noura Mint Seymali stepped to the microphone in West Philadelphia on Sunday night, it became clear just how special the closing event of Crossroads Music's 2014-15 concert season would be. As the full-bodied electric bass of Ousmane Touré and the drumming of Philly's own Matthew Tinari began to pump behind her, Seymali delivered trilling and thrilling lines of exotic vocalization. Her confident control of melisma was impressive; her youthful power was well-measured (although it did require some quick sound-mix adjustment so she wouldn't overwhelm everything)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Alexander Danta curled his frame around a cluttered wooden table in his Jewelers' Row workshop to inspect his latest handiwork, a diamond-and-ruby wedding band that nested in his meaty palm like a newborn chick. Raising the delicate ring to the window, he tipped it slightly to catch the light, revealing an acanthus vine he had just etched on the side, perhaps a centimeter wide and sharp as a line of type. Danta is a master engraver, among the last in Philadelphia to work exclusively with hand tools, and his studio was the custom-made ring's latest stop on its journey through the Jewelry Trades Building at Eighth and Sansom Streets, a six-story beehive filled with designers, casters, polishers, and stone-setters.
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
At an iconic Center City gay bar, mayoral candidate James F. Kenney greeted some of the leading LGBT advocates in the city, calling them his family and pledging to continue to protect their rights, in life and love, at a fund-raiser for his campaign. A drag queen manned the DJ station at Woody's, rainbow flags flew, and a slide show of Kenney through the years played on the TVs. Twenty years ago, such a campaign event likely would not have happened. Today, LGBT voters are seen as a key bloc of politically minded, progressive supporters who are expected to turn out - particularly this year, when two openly gay candidates are running for City Council.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 15 years in Morocco, Steve and Judi Bowman wanted to return home to a diverse community in the United States. So they settled in Upper Darby. The couple renovated a building across from the township building and opened it last year as Five Points Coffee. But Five Points is more than a coffee shop. The Bowmans also started a nonprofit organization, with a vision of serving international students, immigrants, and refugees. Their shop has become a regular meeting place for English conversation groups for nonnative speakers, a local church's SAT tutoring, and the township's multicultural committee.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|